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Rest of Summer August Calendar History

Posted on October 7, 2014 at 1:27 AM Comments comments (35)
Sorry it takes so much for me to get back to the lessons. Grandma is dealing with problems of her own. The rest of August Calendar History begins with Day August 21.

August 21 Birthdays follow:

August 21 1904 William "Count" Basie,  American jazz bandleader, was born.

August 21, 1936 Wilt Chamberlain, professional basketball player, was born.


Events are as follows for August 21:

August 21, 1560 A Total Eclipse of the Sun was observed in Spain 
and Portugal. Witnesses believed it was the end of the world.

Book (1) reports in "Explaining an eclipse-Have your (children) investigate what happens during a solar eclipse, then make diagrams showing the position of the sun, moon, and earth. Afterward, ask the kids to imagine that they were living tin Spain or Portugal during the total eclipse of the sun in 1560. Have them write down their thoughts as if they were composing a diary entry for that day."

August 21, 1621 "One Widow and Eleven Maides" departed London
 for Jamestown, Va. They were to be sold to wife-seeking 
bachelors for 120 pounds of tobacco apiece.

August 21, 1831 Nat Turner led a slave insurrection in 
Southampton County, Va.

August 21, 1878 Dan Casey of the New York Giants 
struck out in the ninth inning, providing Ernest Thayer 
with the inspiration for his famous poem, "Casey at the Bat."

August 1888 William S. Burroughs received a patent for an 
Adding Machine.

August 21, 1959 Hawaii became the 50th state.

Book (1) writes "Hawaiian volcanoes-Have your students locate Hawaii on a map, then ask them to locate and find out about its significant volcanoes. Haleakala, on the island of Maui, is the largest dormant volcano in the world. Its crater is 7 miles long and 2 miles wide. Diamond Head, an extinct volcano, is located on the island of Oahu. Mauna Loa and Kilauea, on the island of Hawaii, are still active. Have students research the differences between active, dormant, and extinct volcanoes. Then use their information to make a class chart."

August 21, 1991 Two days after seizing Soviet president 
Mikail Gorbachev and declaring a 6-month state of emergency, 
the Leaders of the Soviet Coup Surrendered.

Book (1) says in "Beginning of th end of the USSR-The leaders of the Soviet coup surrendered in the face of widespread public resistance and the refusal of key army units to obey their orders. They'd failed to take into account the changes that several years of democratic reforms had brought to Soviet society. And they hadn't arrested the Russian president, Boris Yeltsin, who rallied the people of Moscow and convinced army units oppose the conspirators. Although Mikhail Gorbachev returned to office after the coup, his power had eroded. Within 6 months the Soviet Union no longer existed as a political entity, having been replaced by the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Challenge your (children) to research the republics in the CIS. What are their boundaries? What are their capitals? Who are their leaders? What ethnic groups do they embrace, and what are their populations?"



Next day is August 22 starting with the Birthdays:

August 22, 1862 Claude Debussy, French musician and composer, was born.

Book (1) points out in "Classroom concert-goers-Celebrate the music of Claude Debussy by inviting your (children) to become classroom concert-goers. Select 20 to 40 minutes' worth of Debussy recordings, then have the children relax and listen. If they wish, students can draw pictures, write poems or stories, or simply jot down thoughts inspired by this master's music."

August 22, 1920 Ray Bradbury, American science fiction writer, was born.

Book (1) has this to say here in "Fact and (science) fiction-In honor of Ray Bradbury's birthday, share with your (children) his classic short story "The Veldt." Then ask the kids to note how many of the inventions, technologies, and appliances described in this story written in the 1950s exist today. Discuss how Bradbury and other science fiction writers are able to correctly predict the invention and use of new technologies. Then have (the children) review recent newspapers to find current technological breakthroughs. Invite them to write their own science fiction stories incorporating these new technologies."

August 22, 1920 Denton Cooley, American surgeon who was a 
pioneer in the area of heart transplant operations, was born.

August 22, 1934 H. Norman Schwarzkopf, American general 
and commander of Operation Desert Storm, was born.

August 22, 1949 Diana Nyad, American marathon swimmer, was born.


Next are the Events of August 22:

August 22 1762 Ann Franklin, Benjamin Franklin's sister-in-law, 
became the First Female Editor of an American Newspaper, 
The Mercury of Newport, R.I.

August 22, 1851 The yacht America won the First America's Cup Race.

August 22, 1865 William Sheppard patented Liquid Soap.

Book (1) writes "Sampling soaps-To mark the anniversary of William Sheppard's patent for liquid soap, collect--...a variety of brands of liquid soap. ...have them compare and contrast the various soaps for quality of suds, texture, cleaning power, scent, color, and price. Review (their) ratings, then design a ..."Soap seal of Approval," (The children) can extend their study of liquid soap into the realm of video or audio advertising. Have the kids develop a commercial for their selected super soap. Record or videotape their presentations. (These could possibly be sent into a soap company but don't be surprised if they might steal your ideas from you.)"

August 22, 1881 Clara Barton established the First Chapter 
of the American Association of the Red Cross.

August 22, 1902 Theodore Roosevelt became the First President 
to Ride a Car.

August  22, 1991 In Moscow, a 14-Ton Statue of Felix
Dzerzhinsky, the founder of the Soviet KGB, was 
dismantled while a crowd of 10,000 cheered.



Now we move onto August 23 with the Birthdays:

August 23, 1905 Ernie Bushmiller, American cartoonist 
and creator of the comic strip "Nancy", was born.

Book (1( says in "Personalized comics- In honor of Ernie Bushmiller's birthday, share with your (children) several installments of the "Nancy" comic strip. Then give each child a 3-inch-wide strip of plain paper to fold into fourths. Invite the kids to create comic strips with themselves as the title character."

August 23, 1912 Gene Kelly, American actor and dancer, was born.


Next are the following Events for August 23rd:

August 23, 1775 King George III of England declared that
 the American Colonies were in Rebellion.

August 23, 1784 Settlers west of the Alleghenies established 
the Independent State of Franklin and attempted to win 
admission to the United States.

August 23, 1923 Billy Jones and Ernie Hare, the First Radio 
Comedians, went on the air for the first time.

Book (1) says in "Radio comedy-To mark the anniversary of the first time comedians were heard on the radio, have your (children) produce their own "radio" comedy shows. Working (together the) can gather joke and riddle books or create their own humorous stories and dialogue. Have the (children) take turns tape-recording their funny material in another room. Then play back their "shows" for a "radio audience" of (the family)."

August 23, 1955 John Hackett and Peter Moneypenny made the First London-New York Round-trip in the Same Day. They flew 6,920 miles in 14 hours and 22 minutes.

The story is mentioned in Book (1) under "Rapid round-trip-Challenge your (children) to use their calculators to figure out Hackett and Moneypenny's average speed on their record-setting round-trip flight."

August 23, 1956 The First Nonstop Transcontinental Helicopter 
Flight took place.

August 23, 1977 The First Human-powered Flight took place in
 Schafter, Calif., when Bryan Allen flew the 70-pound,
 pedal-powered  Gossamer Condor for 1 mile.



Next day is August 24 with the Birthdays as follows:

August 24, 1960 Cal Ripken, Jr., professional baseball player, was born.

August 24, 1965 Marlee Matlin, American actress, was born.


Next are the Events for August 24 as follows:

August 24, 79 (This is not a typing error.)Mt. Vesuvius Erupted, 
destroying the Toman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum.

August 24, 1814 British Soldiers invaded Washington and burned
 the Capitol and the White House.

August 24, 1869 Cornelius Swartout patented the Waffle Iron.

Book (1) says in "Wonders of waffles-How many of your (children) enjoy eating waffles for breakfast? Ask the children if the waffles they typically eat are freshly made--with a waffle iron--or frozen. What other breakfast foods do they enjoy? Make a chart of class breakfast favorites. Then challenge students to rate the nutritional values of these foods against the nutritional value of waffles. Have them use their information to create posters, which can be displayed in the (kitchen or somewhere)."

August 24, 1875 Matthew Webb began the First Successful Swim 
of the English Channel from Dover England. He reached Calais, 
France, 21 hours and 45 minutes later.

Book (1) makes an activity of it through "A swimmer's challenge-Since Matthew Webb first swam the English Channel in 1875, many others have repeated his feat. Have (the children) locate the English Channel on a map of Europe. Where is its narrowest point? (Between Dover, England, and Calais, France, the Channel is only about 20 miles wide.) Next, have (the children) do research to find out how many hours it has taken swimmers since Webb to cross the Channel. Plot the results on a graph."

August 24, 1887 The United States established a Scientific 
Observation Post in Greenland.

August 24, 1932 Amelia Earhart became the First Woman 
to make a Nonstop Flight Across the United States, from 
Los Angeles to Newark, N.J. The trip took 19 hours and 5 minutes.

Book (1) writes in "Coast-to-coast questions-Have your (children) use their math and geography skills to determine the mileage from Los Angeles to Newark, N.J. At approximately what speed was Amelia Earhart traveling? Recently, it took about 5 hours and 45 minutes to make a transcontinental flight. Can your (children) calculate the approximate speed at which modern jets travel?"

August 24, 1959 Hiran Fong was sworn in as the First
 Chinese-American in the Senate.

August 24, 1959 Daniel Inouye was sworn in as the
 First Japanese-American Member of the House
 of Representatives.

August 24, 1987 West Germany opened its First 
Wind-Energy Park. Its 30 windmills generate up to 
2 million kilowatt hours of electricity a year.

August 24, 1992 Hurricane Andrew tore through 
densely populated areas of southern Florida, 
becoming the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.

(As some of the stories given in these August days are about some of the disasters of our world Grandma wants you to know there is also a section in Book (57) Grandma has not given you yet and she hopes to here soon.)(Grandma also want to note here that in Book (1) are given a picture or two with the activities but you can draw your own or paste pictures from magazines, newspapers, etc.--They are what the children in Mexico from our family enjoyed tracing from.)



Now we will cover August 25 through the Birthdays first:

August 25, 1836 Bret Harte, American author, was born.

August 25, 1918 Leonard Bernstein, American composer 
and conductor, was born.

August 25, 1927 Althea Gibson, tennis star who became 
the first African-American to win a major U.S. title, was born.


Next we will cover the Events for August 25:

August 25, 1718 The City of New Orleans was founded 
by Jean Baptiste la Moyne.

August 25, 1825 Uruguay declared its independence from Brazil.

August 25, 1829 The government of Mexico rejected President 
Andrew Jackson's Bid to Buy the Mexican State of Texas.

August 25, 1916 The National Park Service was established 
within the Department of the Interior.

Book (1) writes in "Future parks-Have your (children) brainstorm for ways parks of the future may be different from today's parks. List the kids" ideas .... Have (them) develop a plan for a futuristic park. (They) might create maps, three-dimensional models, dioramas, murals, or advertisements for their park. Display their work... ."

August 25, 1921 The United States Signed a Peace Treaty 
With Germany, officially ending World War I hostilities 
between the two nations.

Then Book (1) challenges your talents in "The changing face of Europe-Have your(children) compare and contrast maps of pre- and post-World War I Europe.  What differences do they notice?
Next,show the kids post-World War II and contemporary maps of Europe. Can anyone give an overview of the political conditions that gave rise to all the changes?"

August 25, 1944 Allied Forces Liberated Paris, ending the 
Nazis' 4-year occupation of the French capital during World War II.

August 25, 1989 U.S. government officials announced a $65 million 
aid package to help the government of Colombia fight the drug trade.

August 25 is also called Kiss-And-Make-Up Day and UFO Day

Book (1) writes this activity called "Flying saucer fun-On UFO Day, get your (childrens') imaginations soaring. Welcome them in the morning with some "outer space" music--perhaps the theme from 2001:A Space Odyssey. Next, have them each write a letter inviting an alien to visit your (home). How might they "mail" these letters? Afterward, read aloud a science fiction story. Finally, ...give each ...a paper bag filled with ordinary objects and discarded items--screws, twist ties, paper cups, bottle tops, plastic sandwich bags, old keys, erasers, aluminum foil, and so on. Then challenge each ... to create a UFO from the materials. Let the kids suspend their UFOs from (your home) ceiling."



The Next day is August 26 with 5 birthdays as follows:

August 26, 1740 Joseph Michel Montgolfier, French balloonist, was born.

August 26, 1838 John Wilkes Booth, American actor who 
assassinated Abraham Lincoln, was born.

August 26, 1873 Lee De Forest, American inventor who 
made important contributions to the development of radio 
and television, was born.

August 26, 1906 Albert Sabin, Russian-American microbiologist 
who developed an oral polio vaccine, was born.

August 26, 1935 Geraldine Ferraro, American politician who, 
as the Democratic candidate for vice president in 1984, 
became the first woman to run on a major party's national ticket, 
was born. 


Now we will move into The Events of August 26 along with the activities:

August 26, 1498 Michelangelo was commissioned to create the Pieta.

August 26, 1873 The First U. S. Public School Kindergarten was established.

Book (1) has an activity to go along with this event called "Kindergarten then and now-Celebate the opening of the first U.S. kindergarten by having older students visit (a family with kindergarten children in their homes or even a kindergarten class. Before the visit, have each (child) write a story about a favorite kindergarten memory. Then have the kids buddy up with kindergartners and share their stories. Afterward, they can help their "little buddies" write and illustrate stories about their favorite kindergarten activities. Post all the stories in the hallway under a banner titled "The Best of Kindergarten."

August 26, 1920 The Nineteenth Amendment went into effect, giving 
women the right to vote.

Book (1) brings out "Voting rights-Ask your (children) to speculate on what the word suffragist means.
Then have them check a dictionary. Can they name famous American suffragists, such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucy Stone?"

Therefore, August 26th is also called Women's Equality Day.

August 26, 1939 The Cincinnati Reds and the Brooklyn 
Dodgers played in the First Televised Major League Baseball Game.

Book (1) says in "Out of their league?-Have your (children) name sports besides baseball that are regularly broadcast on television. List these sports on the chalkboard. Are women's sports equally represented? Why or why not? Invite your (children) to write letters to network and cable television officials stating their opinions about the media's coverage of women's sports."

August 26, 1974 Russian cosmonaut Lev Demin became the 
First Grandfather in Space, aboard Soyuz 15.



Now for August 27 with the following Birthdays:

August 27, 1908 Lyndon Baines Johnson, 36th president 
of the United States, was born.

August 27, 1910 Mother Teresa, Albanian-born humanitarian, 
missionary, and Nobel Peace Prize winner, was born.

August 27, 1919 Graham Oakley, children's author, was born.


Now we will cover the Events of August 27:

August 27, 1665 The First Theatrical Performance in the 
American Colonies took place at Accomac, Va. A piece 
called Ye Bear and Ye Cubb was performed.

Book (1) brings out an activity for this performance called "Classroom performances-To celebrate the first theatrical performance in the colonies, have (them) perform a dramatic reading, skit, play, or puppet show."

August 27, 1789 The French National Assembly adopted 
the Declaration of the Rights of Man.

August 27, 1859 The First Successful Oil Well in the 
United States was drilled near Titusville, Pa.

Book (1) has this to say in "Oil drilling and spilling-Since the first U.S. oil well was drilled, Americans have experienced the benefits--and hazards--of using oil. One major hazard is an oil spill, which can occur when oil is being transported. In 1989, for example, the tanker Exxon Valdez spilled 240,000 barrels of oil in Alaska's Prince William Sound. To help students understand the difficulties of cleaning up an oil spill, have them conduct this simple experiment. Give (the children) a shallow pan filled with water and some eyedroppers, straws, paper towels, cotton balls, and spoons. Add about 14 cup of vegetable oil to the pans. Ask the (children) to clean up the "spill" with the materials they were given, and discuss the results. Then have the (children) research the kinds of techniques used to clean up real-life oil spills."

August 27, 1883 Krakatoa, a volcanic island in the Indonesian 
Sunda Strait, exploded, creating a 120-Foot-High Tidal Wave.

Book (1) explains in "Killer wave-The Krakatoa explosion produced what may have been the loudest noise in earth's history and left a 600-foot-deep hole under Sunda Strait where the island had once been. It also created a 120-foot-high tidal wave that killed 36,000 people. Use an almanac and a map of the United States to determine which cities might be covered with water if a 120-foot tidal wave struck the eastern or western coasts. How many people live in those cities? Then have your (children) examine topography maps to get a rough estimate of how much land would be lost if the water level rose 120 feet. Using this information, have the kids create a new U.S. map showing the post-tidal-wave coastline."

August 27, 1904 The First Automobile Driver Jailed for Speeding 
was given a 5-day sentence in Newport County, R.I.

August 27, 1984 President Ronald Reagan announced that a 
schoolteacher would be the First Citizen Astronaut.

August 27, 1989 Pictures received from the U.S. space probe 
Voyager 2 showed signs of Volcanoes on Triton, a moon of Neptune.



Next is August 28 beginning with the three Birthdays:

August 28, 1904 Roger Duvoisin, children's illustrator, was born.

Book (1) gives an explanation in the following activity called "Wise-guy stories-Caldecott medalist Roger Duvoisin introduced children to Petunia the silly goose in 1950. Many of his Petunia stories tackle important philosophical questions. Ask your (children) to discuss how they can tell if someone is smart, then read aloud Petunia. Petunia thought that carrying a book would make her wise. Invite your (children) to create stories in which the main character finds or wears something that makes others think he or she is wise."

August 28, 1926 Phyllis Krasilovsky, children's author, was born.

August 28, 1958 Scott Hamilton, American figure skater, was born.


Next are the Events for August 28 as follows:

August 28, 1609 English navigator Henry Hudson discovered the Delaware Bay.

August 28, 1830 The First American-Built Locomotive, the Tom Thumb
lost a race with a horse-drawn stagecoach.

August 28, 1922 The First Radio Commercial was aired.

August 28, 1957 Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina 
set a Filibuster Record by talking for 24 hours and 18 minutes.

Book (1) has an activity to go with this event called "Delaying tactic-Have your (children) look up the meaning of the word filibuster. Why is this technique used? Do your (children) think filibusters should be permitted in the Senate? Why or why not?"

August 28, 1963 Martin Luther King, Jr., spoke to 200,000 
people at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Book (1) gives this activity called "Dreams day-Tell your (children) that Martin Luther King, Jr., helped organize the 1963 March on Washington--the largest civil rights demonstration in U.S. history. During this demonstration, King gave his famous "I Have a Dream" speech. Share a film of King giving this speech, or have (the children) take turns reading the text of it aloud. Discuss which of King's dreams have come true. What dreams do the children have for America, their (community), their families, or themselves? Have them each write their dreams on strips of paper, then post the strips under these categories on a (poster)."

This why August 28 is given the title of "I Have a Dream" Day.

August 28, 1968 British scientists using sonar detected several 
Huge Objects moving through the Water of Loch Ness in Scotland.

August 28, 1989 Disney Productions purchased the Muppets for $100 million.



There is only three more days left of August 29 to carry out beginning with the following Birthdays:

August 29, 1632 John Locke, English philospher, was born.

Book (1) gives this activity called "Natural rights-tell your (children) that John Locke had a profound influence on Thomas Jefferson's writing of the Declaration of Independence. Locke identified three rights of man similar to those Jefferson included in the Declaration: life, liberty, and property. Ask your (children) to track how these rights are being maintained today. For 1 week, have them review newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasts for actions by local, state, and federal governments that affect these rights. Do the kids feel government is doing its job? What government actions might be taken to further protect these rights?"

August 29, 1811 Henry Bergh, founder of the American Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), was born.

Book (1) covers this in the activity called "Animal rights-Celebrate ASPCA founder Henry Bergh's birthday by having a class discussion about humane treatment of animals. Children who own pets can provide dos and don'ts of pet care. For example, don't keep a large dog confined in a small area (bathroom, laundry room) for long periods; do take the dog for frequent walks. With older children, you can broaden the discussion to include farm and wild animals also."

August 29, 1915 Ingrid Bergman, Swedish actress, was born.

August 29, 1920 Charlie Parker, American jazz saxophonist 
considered a founder of the bebop style, was born.

August 29, 1958 Michael Jackson, American singer, was born.

Book (1) says in "Sensational singer-On singer Michael Jackson's birthday, play some of his hits or screen a couple of his music videos. Explain that in addition to music, Jackson's interests include promoting worldwide peace and intergroup harmony. Then invite your (children) to design birthday cards reflecting the pop star's personality or areas of special concern."



Next are the Events for August 29:

August 29, 1835 The city of Melbourne, Australia, was founded.

August 29, 1884 H. J. Webb completed a 898-Mile Tricycle Ride 
across Scotland.

August 29, 1929 The Airship Graf Zeppelin completed a 
circumnavigation of the globe in record time: 21 days,
 7 hours, 26 minutes.

August 29, 1966 The Beatles Gave Their Last Live 
Performance, at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.

August 29, 1971 Hank Aaron became the First National 
League Baseball Player to Drive in 100 runs in each of 11 Seasons.

August 29, 1982 British explorers Sir Ranulph Fiennes and 
Charles Burton successfully completed the First Aerial 
Circumnavigation of the Globe by way of the North and South Poles. 



Now for August 30th with the following Birthdays:

August 30, 1797 Mary Shelley, English author whose 
best-known work is Frankenstein, was born.

August 30, 1901 Roy Wilkins, American civil rights leader, was born.

August 30, 1909 Virginia Lee Burton, children's author, was born.

August 30, 1918 Ted Williams, American baseball player, was born.

Book (1) says in "Ted Williams math-Boston Red Sox star Ted Williams was one of the greatest hitters in baseball history, Among his many other batting feats, Williams was the last man to hit over .400 in a season, posting a .406 batting average in 1941. Explain to your (children) that batting averages are computed by dividing a player's total number of hits by his total number of at bats, and carrying the division to three decimal places. Thus Williams's .406 batting average means that he got hits 40.6% of the times he was up. Projected over the course of 1,000 at bats, he'd have gotten 406 hits. Now pase this math problem for your (children) to do as quickly as possible in their heads: With his batting average of .406, how many hits would Williams have gotten if he'd have gotten if he'd had 600 at bats? ... Then discuss the kids' strategies. Did (they solve the problem by taking half of 406 (203, or the number of hits Williams would have gotten in 500 at bats), and adding 40.6 (the number he'd have gotten in 100 at bats?"

August 30, 1938 Donald Crews, children's author and illustrator, was born.

Book (1) has an activity in "Inspirations for writing-Donald Crews drew on childhood experiences as inspiration for his book Freight Train. During summer vacations, Crews used to take the train from his home in New Jersey to his grandparents' farm in Florida. His grandparents" porch was only 150 yards from the railroad tracks. Crews liked to sit on the porch and watch the freight trains roll by, counting their cars to pass the time. Share the book Freight Train with your students. Then invite the class to make a freight train to record the books they read for 1 month. Post a construction-paper train engine on a poster board. Then give each child several construction-paper freight cars. Have your students write the titles of books they finish reading on the freight cars, then attach the cars to the train engine."          


Now for the Events of August 30 as follows:

August 30, 1682 William Penn sailed from England to America to take over a tract of land--Pennsylvania--granted to him by the king.

August 30, 1780 General Benedict Arnold secretly promised 
to surrender the American fort at West point, N.Y., to the British. 

August 30, 1830 The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad abandoned
 the horse-powered locomotive for trains powered by steam. 

August 30, 1970 Abraham Zapruder, who filmed the assassination of 
President John F. Kennedy, died.

August 30, 1983 Lt. Col. Guion S. Bluford, Jr., became the 
First African-American Astronaut in Space.

August 30, 1984 The space shuttle Discovery blasted 
off on its maiden voyage. 




Last is August 31 with its Birthdays:

August 31, 1786 Michel Eugene Chevreul, French 
chemist who invented margarine, was born. 

August 31, 1870 Maria Montessori, Italian educator, was born.

Book (1) has an activity for this in "Nontraditional schools-Teacher Maria Montessori was unhappy with the way young children were educated, so she started her own school. Ask your (children) to research the backgrounds of Montessori and others who had to create their own schools or programs to meet specific needs--for example, Booker T. Washington, Howard Gardner, Lucy Calkins, Nancie Atwell, Sylvia Townsend-Warner, and Christopher Whittle. (The children) also can scan newspapers and magazines for information about contemporary school experiments, including for-profit schools, business-run schools, and magnet schools. Encourage the kids to clip pertinent articles and share their information with the (family).

August 31, 1945 Itzhak Perlman, Israeli violinist, was born.

August 31, 1945 Van Morrison, Irish singer and songwriter, was born.

August 31, 1955 Edwin Moses, American track star, was born.



Now the Events for August 31 are as follows:

August 31, 1881 The First Men's Tennis Singles
 Championships were held in Newport, R.I. 

August 31, 1886 The First Recorded Major Earthquake in 
U.S. history rocked Charleston, S.C. 

August 31, 1954 Hurricane Carol hit New England, 
New York, and New Jersey, causing $500 million in damage.

August 31, 1964 The Bureau of the Census announced that 
California had surpassed New York as the most populous 
U.S. state.

Book (1) makes these comments and activity "California, her they come-Renowned for its pleasant weather, miles of beaches, job opportunities, and laid-back life-style, California became a magnet for Americans from other parts of the country. Have your (children) compare the population of their state with that of California, the nation's largest. Also challenge the kids to find countries that have fewer citizens than California. (Do lots of study about California and the inhabitants there. For my argument with one of my brother-in-laws is that some people in Washington D.C. do not understand how the lack of illegal immigrants will affect the fruit industry and how many young citizen Americans will not be willing to do the work they do for us. Right now there are some real strong problems in California because of the economy and the step down on illegal immigrants. Have the children make a report about the problems California is facing.) (Also find out how that may all be affecting the Census now.)                                                                                                                                                           August 31, 1980 Poland's Solidarity trade union was founded
at the port city of Gdansk.

August 31, 1982 The First Giant Squid Captured Alive was 
taken near Bergen, Norway.

  Book (1) brings the story out in "Searching for squid-Ask your (children) to speculate about the size of a typical giant squid. Write their guesses (down), then challenge them to research the correct answer. If possible, buy some squid at a local fish market and let the children examine it. Have them note the squid's sucking discs. What are these used for? (They help the squid trap and hold prey.)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  This the last activity for the summer lessons and for August Calendar History to placed on the time line. Grandma has a few additions she may be adding occasionally. She wishes you the best of luck on your journey through the Home Education Program of Grandma's Place of Natural Learning Center. Have a good year home schooling and take care.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

More of Calendar History for Summer August

Posted on October 2, 2014 at 3:37 PM Comments comments (62)
I read more of the blogs posted in, thanks for the added information. I found out many comments were placed in spam because they were articles to sell. Grandma is going to check them out she may be able to use some things if people want to cooperate with her. I am sorry! Grandma cannot wait until she gets to tell you more on real estate and decorating. Some very simple messages. I really did like the one on the sofa fitting. Grandma has a hard time deciding to move her sofa forward closer to the fireplace, giving space behind where a table is usually put. My decorating is not fancy and many times I make due. I have learned many little tricks on a small budget and some very nice things to do. However, I must save everything till I can finish this goal first. Keep blogging, it makes my heart very strong.

Our next calendar day from Book (1) is August 11 with the following Birthdays:

August 11, 1778 Friedrich Ludwig Jahn, German teacher
who invented gymnastics, was born.

Book (1) has an activity for this it is called "Early phys ed-Tell your (children) that Friedrich Ludwig Jahn wrote books about the importance of physical education and developed rudimentary versions of today's gymnastics equipment. Are there any gymnasts in your (home)? Ask your (children) to list the kinds of physical activities they do. (My doctors say swimming is one of the best-especially for me, Grandma,  with Osteoarthritis in the knees and bending as well as walking has become a real problem.)"

August 11, 1865 Gifford Pinchot, American politician,
author, and conservationist, was born.

August 11, 1908 Don Freeman, children's author and creator of Corduroy,
was born.

Book (1) says in "Corduroy corner-To celebrate Don Freeman's birthday, gather copies of his works for a special book corner. Titles might include Corduroy, A Pocket for Corduroy, and Dandelion. You might also invite the children to bring (out their favorite stuffed bear-or other animal-- and tell why it means so much to them. (Grandma used to believe it would be fun to have the children make a little zoo or corner for all the different animals in our world.)"

August 11, 1921 Alex Haley, American author who wrote
Roots and coauthored The Autobiography of Malcolm X, was born.

August 11, 1941 Steven Kroll, children's author, was born.

August 11, 1944 Joanna Cole, children's author, was born.

August 11, 1953 Hulk Hogan, American wrestler, was born.


Now we will cover the Events for August 11:

August 11, 1841 Former slave Frederick Douglass spoke at his
first antislavery conference.

Book (1) tells us in "Civil War dialogue-During the Civil War, Frederick Douglass tried to rally blacks to fight against the South and helped organize two black regiments for this purpose. Douglass also met with President Lincoln several times to discuss the problems of slavery. Ask your (children) to work ...to conduct some background research about the life of Frederick Douglass, President Lincoln's stance on slavery, and conditions in the United States during the Civil War. Have the (children) speculate about some of the things Douglass and Lincoln might have spoken about. Then have (them use (their) research to create a dialogue that might have occurred between the two. (Have the children role play out the conversation between the two men.)"

August 11, 1877 The First Satellite of the Planet Mars was
discovered by Asaph Hall, director of the U.S. Naval Observatory.

August 11, 1972 The Last U.S. Combat Troops left Vietnam.

August 11, 1984 Carl Lewis Won His Forth Gold Medal at the
Olympic Games in Los Angeles.

The Perseids Meteor Shower also Peaks on August 11.



Our Next day is August 12 with the Birthdays as follows:

August 12, 1774 Robert Southey, English poet who popularized
the fairy tale The Three Bears, was born.

Book (1) has an activity for Southey's birthday called "Telling different tales-In honor of Robert Southey's birthday, collect several different editions of The Three Bears. Read one edition aloud, then ...(have the children) read the other editions of this fairy tale, noting the similarities and differences among them. (The children) can then vote for the edition they think has the best illustrations, the best vocabulary, the best character delineation, or any other categories they decide on." (Considering we are falling into a lot about Bears with Theodore's Bear included, Grandma has decided when you get to the Fall lessons of the Settlers it would be a good time to gather all the different bears together out there and make  lessons including this one with that of Kings and Queens, Renaissance, forests, fairy tales, other animals and animals of the forest, Halloween, Day of the Dead, or Harvest stories (one such being is The Wizard of OZ), along the line of the Fall time, etc. Then tying it into Canada, Antarctica, Alaska and the winter season along with the explorers, the United States Revolution, etc. It almost becomes a year round study with everything and ends in February, March, or April when we move into the later 1900's. 
As you recall if you do Grandma blogged sometime back which you can find on her block search about Theodore Roosevelt not wanting to shoot a baby bear. Grandma looked it up tonight on the computer and one web said he was hunting with the Governor of Missouri in Missouri and the people in the party had tied up a bear for Theodore to shoot since he was known so well for his hunting skills and he thought it was inhumane and would not shoot the bear, which seems good to me. The papers wrote it up and someone developed the first "Teddy Bear"  naming it after Theodore Roosevelt.
A last little note here, is that this kind of teaching is called web learning where a teacher starts with a subject as Bears in an oval on a piece of paper and forms other bubbles or ovals around that it connects to and then those bubbles are connected together. It all goes into a unit. Grandma has a Bear Unit in Book (57) she just remembers that she will give to you later in another blog. This is just the way Grandma's mind Naturally works. Grandma would so much like to have a school here to share her materials as the books with. Grandma saves all kinds of recycled  items to do things with. She just has not figured out a way to get people here.Her family does not understand at all.) 

August 12, 1781 Robert Mills, American architect and 
designer of the Washington Monument, was born.

August 12, 1859 Katherine Lee Bates, American author 
who wrote the words to "America the Beautiful", was born.

August 12, 1880 Christy Mathewson, baseball star who
 became one of the first five players inducted into the 
Hall of Fame, was born.

August 12, 1955 Ann Martin, children's author and 
creator of the Baby-sitters Club series, was born.

Book (1) says in "Book ideas-Tell your (children) that Ann Martin, author of the Baby-sitters Club books, draws on her own childhood experiences in many of her books. Martin says she remembers what it felt like being a kid, and she tries to put those feelings into her books. Ask your (children) to recall a happy, sad, frightening, confusing, or thought-provoking experience they've had during the previous year, and to write a paragraph about it. Send these paragraphs to the author as suggestions for future Baby-sitters Club books."
(Grandma noticed one day how her mother wrote little notepad book she keeps all the time. When she fills one up she gets another. It is a good way to keep record of phone calls made, things that happened that day, bills to pay, and remember things. It keeps it all in one little record. A lot of people do it on a calendar. Grandma's days sometimes have just been so busy having to handle things, run in the car, and various other items in which I may not have recorded as well as reaching the true feelings about them. I did find one notebook I had business cards and other things I kept record of. I am getting ready to do a story or autobiography with my pictures-the sons have stated they have no interest in such things but maybe some of the grandchildren, or great-grandchildren will appreciate it. Grandma is learning to reach into her feeling bag of expression a little better. Maybe it will all come together soon enough. The use of your Family books, Yearbooks, and Newspapers keeps some record for you also.)

Grandma is moving on into the Events of August 12:

August 12, 1658 The First Police Force in America was 
established in New Amsterdam, now New York City.

Book (1) talks about it in "Community protectors-To mark the establishment of the first American police force, have a (family) discussion about how police, firefighters, and paramedics help protect us. Then write a ...thank-you letter to local units of each of these groups." (This is a good lesson to tie to the beginnings of the year on our safety learning and also the happening of 9-11, which is absolutely a puzzle.)

August 12, 1676 Metacomet (Philip), chief of the Wampanoag 
Indians, was killed, effectively ending King Philip's War, a bitter 
conflict between New England settlers and the Wampanoag tribe.

August 12, 1851 Isaac Singer began production of his Sewing Machine.

August 12, 1877 Thomas Edison invented the Phonograph.

August 12, 1936 Marjorie Gestring, age 13, became the 
Youngest Person to Win an Olympic Gold Medal in 
springboard diving.



Next is August 13th with the following birthdays:

August 13, 1818 Lucy Stone, American women's rights leader, was born.

August 13, 1860 Annie Oakley, American markswoman, was born.

Book (1) writes "Sharpest shooter-As a young girl, Annie Oakley showed a tremendous talent for marksmanship, beating a national rifle champion in a shooting match. She could hit a coin thrown into the air or the thin edge of a playing card at 30 paces. Her skill earned her the nickname "Little Sure Shot." Have your (children) think about their special talents. What nicknames might they give themselves? Have them use these nicknames as the basis of a self-portrait."

August 13, 1895 Bert Lanr, American actor who played the
 Cowardly Lion in The Wizard of OZ, was born.

Book (1) writes "Of cowards and courage-Your (children) are probably familiar with Bert Lahr's portrayal of the Cowardly Lion from The Wizard of Oz.Ask the children to discuss what it means to be a coward. Why is it strange to see a lion act cowardly? Can they think of ways to help someone feel less afraid?Have the kids each write a paragraph telling what they do to feel less afraid in difficult situations."

August 13, 1899 Alfred Hitchcock, English filmmaker, was born.

August 13, 1927 Fidel Castro, premier of Cuba, was born.

Now we move onto the Events:

August 13, 1521 Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortez 
captured the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, the site of 
present-day Mexico City.

August 13, 1870 Before starting down the Colorado River
 into the Grand Canyon, explorer John Wesley Powell wrote,
 "We are now ready to start on our way down the Great Unknown...."

August 13, 1889 William Gray patented the Pay Telephone.

August 13, 1961 East Germany Closed the Border Between
 East and West Berlin.

August 13, 1969 President Richard Nixon bestowed the
 Medal of Freedom on Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, 
Edwin Aldrin, and Michael Collins after their historic landing on the moon.

August 13 is also International Left-Handers Day in which Book (1) writes "Looking at lefties-On International Left-Handers Day, survey your (children) to see how many of them are southpaws. Have these (children) share the benefits and drawbacks of being left-handed with (you). Then encourage (those children) who are right-handed to use their left hands to perform some everyday tasks--sharpening their pencils, writing, turning a light switch off and on, opening a jar, and so on. Have lefties try these tasks with their right hands." 




August 14th begins with the following birthdays:

August 14, 1777 Hans Christian Oersted, danish chemist 
and physicist who discovered the principle of electromagnetism, was born.

Book(1) writes "Magnetic attraction-Danish physicist and chemist Hans Christian Oersted discovered that an electrical current produces a magnetic field. On his birthday, demonstrate this principle to your (children). You'll need the following materials: a 2-foot-long piece of insulated wire with the ends stripped; a 2-inch nail; a D cell battery; and some metal paper clips. Spread the paper clips on a table. Ask your (children) to test whether the battery, the nail, or the wire by themselves will attract the paper clips. (They won't.) Next, coil the wire tightly around the nail, leaving 2 inches of wire free at each end. Then press the stripped ends of the wire against the top and bottom of the battery. Now have your (children) test whether the paper clips will be attracted. (They will.) Tell your students that they've just created an electromagnet."

August 14, 1918 Alice Provensen, children's author, was born.

August 14, 1959 Earvin "Magic" Johnson, American basketball
 player, was born.



Next will be given the Events for August 14:

August 14, 1511 Michelangelo's Paintings On the Sistine 
Chapel Ceiling were first exhibited.

August 14, 1784 The First Russian Colony in Alaska was 
founded at Three Saints Bay on Kodiak Island.

August 14, 1894 Angry at being fired, Jerry Murphy, the 
city jailer at Leavenworth, Kan., unlocked the prison 
doors and Released all the Prisoners.

August 14, 1919 A U.S Aeromarine flying boat dropped a 
bag of mail on the deck of the liner Adriatic. 
This was the First Airmail Delivery at Sea.

August 14, 1935 President Franklin Roosevelt signed the 
Social Security Act, creating the nation's first system of 
retirement income.

August 14, 1945 Japan Surrendered, ending World War II.

August 14, 1976 To raise money for the Monticello, N.Y., 
Community General Hospital, two teams began a 
Marathon Softball Game.

An activity given in Book (1) is called "Can you spell "fund-raiser"?-The softball marathon played in Monticello, N.Y., in 1976 lasted from 10:00 a.m. on Aug. 14 to 4 p.m. the following day. The 365-inning game, which ended in a score of 492-467, raised $4,000 for a local hospital. Why not organize a fund-raiser for your (church or something in your community.) Your (children) can solicit pledges for a marathon spelling test. Sponsors can donate a penny per word. Have the children decide how to use the money--.... Include words from all of your (children's) textbooks on the test. Start in the morning and continue until lunch (if feasible). ... . The (children) could earn one penny for each correctly spelled word."

August 14, 1985 Japan launched Spacecraft-Planet A on a 
Mission to Halley's Comet.




Our next day to dip into is August 15 starting with the Birthdays:

August 15, 1769 Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of the French, was born.

August 15, 1915 Turkle Brinton, children's author, was born.

August 15, 1922 Leonard Baskin, children's illustrator, was born.

The Events for this day are as follows:

August 15, 1057 Macbeth, the king of Scotland, was murdered 
by Malcolm III, the son of King Duncan.

August 15, 1914 The SS Ancon became the First Ship to Travel 
Through the Panama Canal.

August 15, 1943 Sergeant Edward Dzuba received the Legion of 
Merit for his Recipes for Using Leftovers.

Book (1) says in "Lots of leftovers-Challenge your (children) to come up with zany uses for common leftovers. For instance, leftover mashed potatoes could be used to patch roads, Leftover pudding might make great finger paint. Compile (the children's) suggestions in a ...book titled "Fresh Uses for Leftovers."

August 15, 1947 Great Britain granted independence to India.

August 15, 1948 The Republic of Korea was proclaimed.

August 15, 1963 A total of 2,600 books were selected as 
the nucleus for an official White House Library.

Book (1) says in "Personal library plans-If your (children) could select 10 books for their own libraries, which titles would they pick? Have them each make a list, then group the books into genres. What's the most popular genre among your (children)? Combine (their) lists and post as a reading reference for the kids. Have (them) design bookplates for books that are added to the (your) library."

August 15, 1969 The Woodstock Music and Arts Fair opened in 
upstate New York.

August 15, 1970 Pat Palinkas of the Orlando Panthers became the 
First Woman to Play in a Professional Football Game.

August 15, 1985 South African President P.W. Botha publicly 
rejected Western pleas to abolish apartheid.

August 15 is also National Relaxation Day so Book (1) says in "Just relax-Ask your (children) to describe what they like to do for relaxation. Their responses might include sedentary activities, such as reading or watching television, as well as more active pursuits, such as playing a sport or taking a walk. Afterward, discuss why it isn't always necessary to "take it easy" in order to relax."



The next day is August 16 with the following Birthdays:

August 16, 1845 Gabriel Lippman, French physicist and 
inventor of color photography, was born.

August 16, 1917 Matt Christopher, children's author, was born

Book (1) writes "Favorite games-Most of Matt Christopher's books for children are on sports topics. When Christopher was growing up, his favorite sport was baseball. Despite a lack of equipment, he and his friends played the game in his backyard, which was cement. The boys used broken broom handles and tennis balls instead of bats and baseballs. They used flat rocks to mark the bases. Ask your (children) if they've ever improvised in order to play a favorite game. Then have them interview their parents about favorite games they played as children. Have the kids share their information with the class."


Next are the Events for August 16:

August 16, 1858 Queen Victoria of England and President 
James Buchanan of the United States exchanged greetings 
by means of the New Transatlantic Cable.

August 16, 1861 The federal government Prohibited Trade 
between the States of the Union and the Confederacy.

August 16, 1916 The United States and Canada signed 
a Treaty to Protect Migratory Birds.

Book (1) says in "Birds of a feather-Tell Your (children) that the Arctic tern is the champion migratory bird. This bird travels from one pole to the other, making a round-trip flight of over 20,000 miles. Divide the class into teams, and have each team learn about the migratory pattern of a different bird, such as ducks, geese, and swallows. Compare the number of miles traveled by each species on a class chart."

August 16, 1920 Baseball player Roy Chapman was hit 
in the Head by a Pitched Ball and died the following day.
 He was the only professional ballplayer to die in that manner.

Book (1) points out for Safety Lessens "Sports safety-Do your (children) think sports are safer today than in 1920, when Roy Chapman was fatally injured in a baseball game? List several sports--baseball, football, hockey, soccer--on... . For each sport, have (the children) identify the equipment and rules that help protect players from injury. (There has been some specials on TV concerning the injuries children are getting from playing ball games and if they helmets should be redone.) Have any of your (children) ever been injured playing sports? Ask them to share their experiences. Then ask (them) to suggest a type of equipment, rule change, or other strategy that might have prevented the injury. Afterward, invite a team coach or physical education instructor to discuss sports safety with your (children)."

August 16, 1977 Rock-and roll idol Elvis Presley Died.



The next day of study is August 17 with the following Birthdays:

August 17, 1786 Davy Crockett, American frontiersman, 
soldier, and politician, was born.

Book (1) writes about it in "American folk hero-Frontiersman, scout, soldier, and politician, Davy Crockett was among the more colorful figures of his day. Have your (children) conduct background research about Crockett's life, then prepare a time line showing his varied adventures. What important events in U.S history occurred during Crockett's lifetime? Have students list these events on the time line. (You could either make a raccoon hat or a log cabin or both on a poster or cut them out to paste little papers on. Else list them on a study paper or note cards if space is limited. You can even add them in with your other line papers to hang up.)"

August 17, 1926 Myra Cohn Livingston, children's poet, was born.

Book (1) writes about it in "Enlightening poetry-Read aloud to your (children) from Myra Cohn Livingston's Light and Shadow. Ask the kids to list the places Livingston finds light--a toll bridge, the waves, a sign in a store window. Where does she discover shadows? (In the forest, leaning against a door, across stone walls.) Have (the children) work...to list other places or where they'd find light and shadow. Have them write their own poems about light and shadow on sheets of white construction paper, then mount the sheets on black construction paper. Display their work... ." (Grandma has always felt there should be lessons about shadows, and it can also be tied to studies and experiments about the sun and the moon. Grandma has a game the children can play in which they hide behind a sheet curtain with a light shone on it in a dark room and do different things with their hands and selves for others to guess what or who they are. Another thing they do with children is to shine a light on a dark wall with the shape of their faces showing on a piece of paper taped on it to show their profiles to be drawn out and placed on background paper. You may see if you can do anything in this direction."

August 17,  1943 Robert DeNiro, American actor, was born.

Now for the Events of that day, August 17:

August 17, 1788 The town of Cincinnati (originally named 
Losantville) was founded.

Book (1) gives this activity of "City mapping-Have your (children) find Cincinnati on a map of Ohio. In what part of the state is it located? Which geographic features might have influenced the city's location?"

August 17, 1807 Robert Fulton's steamboat, the Clermont
made its first run up the Hudson River from New York to Albany.

August 17, 1877 American astronomer Asaph Hall sighted 
the second satellite of the planet Mars, naming it Phobos.

August 17, 1896 George Carmack Discovered Gold in 
Klondike Creek in the Yukon Territory of Canada. 

August 17, 1933 New York Yankee Lou Gehrig Broke the
 Record for Most Consecutive Baseball Games Played
 when he appeared in his 1,308th straight game. Gehrig
 eventually stretched his record to 2,130 games.

Book (1) presents "Record setters-How many times in a row can your (children) do something? Have the kids each keep track of the number of consecutive days they complete their homework. Who's the record setter in your (home)?

August 17, 1978 Three American balloonists completed the First Successful Transatlantic Balloon Flight, landing their craft, the Double Eagle, near Paris. They also set an endurance record of 138 hours, 6 minutes in the air.



The next day to use from Book (1) is August 18 with the following Birthdays:

August 18, 1587 Virginia Dare, the first English child born 
in America, was born.

August 18, 1774 Meriwether Lewis, American explorer and 
coleader of the Lewis and Clark expedition, was born.

August 18, 1934 Roberto Clemente, Puerto Rican baseball player, was born.

Book (1) says in "One of baseball's best-In honor of Roberto Clemente's birthday, invite your (children) to bring in their baseball cards. Does anyone have a Roberto Clemente card? If so, have that child share Clemente's statistics with (you). If not, encourage (the children) to use a sports almanac to find out about Clemente's career accomplishments. Then let the kids make a postersized Roberto Clemente baseball card."

August 18, 1937 Robert Redford, American actor, was born. 

August 18, 1944 Paula Danziger, children's author, was born.

August 18, 1954 Patrick Swayze, American actor, was born.


That is it for the birthdays now we will look at the Events for August 18:

August 18, 1856 Gail Borden patented the First Successful 
Milk-Condensing Process.

August 18, 1873 John Lucas, Charles Begole, and A.H.
 Johnson became the First Climbers to Reach the Top of 
Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the contiguous United States.

Book (1) writes in "Mountains of information-To commemorate the first successful climb of California's highest peak, divide the rest of the states among your (children). Have the kids find out the highest points in their states, their elevations, and if applicaable, when they were first scaled and by whom, then write this information on slips of paper. Make sure the children sign their names on the slips they do. Collect the slips and hold a ..."mountain bee" by reading aloud the information and having the kids guess which sate the high point is in. Afterward, have your (children) record their facts on mountain-shaped sheets of construction paper scaled according to height. Arrange their work on (a wall or poster board) to resemble a mountain range, then label the display "Mountains of Information." (If you do not have a big enough basement or somekind of a wall or have a bulletin board because a poster board I do not feel will be big enough; Grandma feels you could collect them together to form a book or put in a folder (for a book would be the nicest))."

August 18, 1902 Major League Baseball's First Unassisted 
Triple Play was made by Henry O'Hagen.

August 18, 1914 President Woodrow Wilson issued his 
"Proclamation of Neutrality," aimed at keeping the 
United States out of World War I.

August 18, 1919 The Anti-Cigarette League of America was organized.

Book (1) writes "Thumbs down for cigarettes-To mark the anniversary of the founding of the Anti-Cigarette League,have each (child) choose one of the many good reasons not to smoke, think of an appropriate slogan, and create a poster."

August 18, Gerald Ford was Nominated for President on 
the first ballot at the Republican National Convention in 
Kansas City, Mo.



Next day is August 19 with the following Birthdays in the beginning:

August 19, 1646 John Flamsteed, English astronomer, was born.

Book (1) writes about him in "Star man-John Flamsteed, who served as England's first Astronomer Royal, cataloged about 3,000 stars. Challenge (your children) to list as many stars as they can think of --along with the constellations the stars are in, if the (children) know--in 5 minutes. Award one point for each correct star and one point for each correct constellation. ...(Award them with their hard work.)"

August 19, 1871 Orville Wright, American aviation pioneer
 and (coinventer) of the airplane, was born.

August 19, 1902 Ogden Nash, American poet known for
 his humorous verse, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Animal poetry-Celebrate Ogden Nash's birthday by reading aloud his portraits of animals--for example, "The Sea Gull" or "the Turtle." Then have your (children) develop comic-strip versions of the poems or follow Nash's rhyme schemes to develop their own humorous animal poems."

August 19, 1931 Willie Shoemaker, American jockey, was born.

August 19, 1938 Vicki Cobb, children's author, was born.

August 19, Bill Clinton, 42nd president of the United States, was born.


Now for August 19th Events:

August 19, 1692 Six residents of Salem, Mass., were executed 
after being Accused of Practicing Witchcraft.

August 19, 1775 A Horde of Earwigs infested houses and 
gardens in Stroud, England. Residents fled to the surrounding 
countryside.

Book (1) writies "Insect invasion-Show your (children) illustrations or photographs of earwigs. These insects have short, borny forewings, a pair of forceps at the end of the abdomen, and biting mouthparts. Then ask the kids to work ...to develop a horror play titled "Invasion of the Earwigs" or a mock front page for a Stroud newspaper story on the insect invasion."

August 19, 1812 The U.S. frigate Constitution won the nickname 
"Old Ironsides" by defeating the British frigate Guerriere in a War 
of 1812 battle.

August 19, 1971 The Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Forest 
Service announced plans to save the 50 to 60 California 
Condors left in the wild.

August 19, 1991 A group of Communist hardliners led by the 
vice president, defense minister, interior minister, and head 
of the KGB attempted a Coup in the Soviet Union, detaining 
President Mikhail Gorbachev in his dacha in the Crimea and 
dispatching tanks to secure the streets of Moscow.

August 19 is also known as National Aviation Day.



Now for the beginning of August 20th with the Birthdays:

August 20, 1785 Oliver Hazard Perry, U.S. naval officer 
and hero of the War of 1812, was born.

August 20, 1946 Connie Chung, American TV reporter 
and anchor, was born.


Now for the Events of August 20th:

August 20, 1741 Alaska was Discovered by the Danish 
explorer Vitus Bering.

Book (1) writes "Close continents-Vitus Bering was commissioned by Russia to find out whether Asia and North America were connected. When he sailed through the Bering Straight on his first voyage, dense fog obscured his view, and Bering didn't realize how close he was to the North American continent. On his second voyage, in 1741, he spotted Alaska. Have your students locate the Bering Strait on a map and use the map scale to determine the distance separating Asia and North America at the closest point."

August 20, 1857 After being harpooned by the crew of the 
whaling ship Ann Alexander, a Whale Attacked and 
destroyed the vessel.

Book (1) writes about these "Whaling woes-Tell your (children) that during the period the Ann Alexander sailed, whales were hunted primarily for their blubber (a thick layer of fat beneath the skin), which was used to make oil. The oil was used as lamp fuel before the invention of kerosene. List several whale species ... .--for example, blue, finback, right, humpback, and sperm. Have (the children) each investigate the status of one of these species. (All the whales listed above are endangered.) Ask (the children) to draw and color a picture of (different) whales, then attach a paragraph describing (their) size, ... feeding habits, and where (they) can be found."

August 20, 1912 The Plant Quarantine Act went into effect, 
placing restrictions on the entry of plants into the United States.

August 20, 1934 The Comic Strip"Li'l Abner" first appeared.

August 20, 1940 Winston Churchill paid Tribute to the 
Royal Air Force by saying, "Never in the field of Human 
conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

August 20, 1968 James McAdam, Jr., snagged the 
Largest Sea Bass on Record--563 pounds.

Book (1) says in "A large mass of bass-Can your (children) imagine how huge a 563-pound fish is? To help them visualize this big bass, ask each child how much he or she weighs. Add the weights together until the total reaches (around) 563 pounds. How many children is that?"

August 20, 1977 The unmanned spacecraft Voyager 2 
was launched. Its destinations were Jupiter, Saturn, 
Uranus, and Neptune.

August 20, 1985 The original Xerox Copy Machine was donated to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.

Book (1) writes "Museum-quality pieces?-Ask your (children) whether they think the first Xerox copy machine deserves a place in the Smithsonian. Why or why not? What kinds of items do they think will be in the Smithsonian 100 years from now? Make a ... list."

(Grandma will finish the rest of August Calendar History very soon.)

Some more July Summer Lessons

Posted on September 15, 2014 at 8:41 PM Comments comments (86)
We will start with July 17th Calendar History with activities all from Book (1). First we have the birthdays:

July 17, 1859 Luis Munoz-Rivera, Puerto Rican patriot and poet, was born.

For now it is known as Munoz-Rivera Day in Puerto Rico.

July 17, 1932 Karla Kuskin, children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in "Word lover-Author Karla Kuskin once said that her love of words was so great that she couldn't even bear to discard fortune-cookie fortunes. Have your (children) write their own fortunes or words of wisdom on 6-in-long strips of adding-machine tape. Tape the strips together and post them in the hallway for others to read. Later, introduce your (children) to the works of Karla Kuskin by reading The Philharmonic Gets Dressed."

July 17, 1935 Donald Sutherland, Canadian actor, was born.

The Events will be now:

July 17, 1850 The Fist Photograph of a Star was taken.

July 17, 1897 The steamship Portland arrived in Washington with
the First Major Gold Shipment from the Klondike.

July 17, 1938 Pilot Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan left
New York for California. He eventually landed in Dublin, Ireland.

Book (1) writes in "Wrong-way day-When Douglas "Wrong Way" Corrigan landed in Dublin, Ireland, he got out of his plane and asked, "Isn't this Los Angeles?" Invite your (children) to have a "wrong-way day." For example, (children) might wear their shirts backward, or you might mix up the schedule. You might also include some "wrong ways" into social studies. Have students consider how U.S. history would be different if certain events came out the "wrong way." For instance, what if the South had won the Civil War or we would have lost the Revolution War against England? What if the Pilgrims had landed in California?"

July 17, 1954 The First Newport Jazz Festival was held in Newport, R.I.

July 17, 1975 U.S. Astronauts and Soviet Cosmonauts
Joined Hands after linking their Apollo and Soyuz spacecrafts.

July 17, 1987 The Dow Jones Industrial Average Closed
over 2,500 points for the first time in history.

Book (1) says in "Stock market speculators-On the anniversary of the Dow Jones 2,500-point milestone, begin this (nearly) hands-on stock market activity. ...give each (child) $500 in play money. Explain that for the next 2 weeks, (they) will be seeking "profit" by investing their "money" in stocks. You will be the broker. For their initial investments, (they) can buy $500 worth of shares in any stock or stocks listed on the New York Stock Exchange.Each morning, (look at ) the business pages of the newspaper so the (children) can check the previous day's closing prices. Give the (children) the opportunity at this time to sell and buy stocks at the closing prices. At the end of the 2 weeks, total the value of each (child's) stocks to determine who earns the title of Wall Street wizards."



Next is July 18th starting with the birthdays:

July 18, 1918 Nelson Mandela, South African civil rights
activist and longtime leader of the African National Congress, was born.

July 18, 1921 John Glenn, U.S. astronaut
who was the first American to orbit the earth.

Book (1) has this to say about it in "Firsts in space-Have (the children) conduct research to find out about other "Firsts" in space exploration--for example, the first rendezvous in space, space station, space walk, U.S. astronaut, black astronaut, woman astronaut, space shuttle(, etc.) Armed with their data, the (children) can each make a rocket-shaped time line depicting these important events."

July 18, 1954 Felicia Bond, children's author, was born.


Now for July 18th Events:

July 18, 1792  American naval hero John Paul Jones died.

July 18, 1874 Tennis was introduced to the United States.

July 18, 1925 The American Automobile Association
Declared Women Drivers to be as Competent as Men Drivers.

July 18, 1940 Franklin Roosevelt was Nominated
for an Unprecedented Third Term.

July 18, 1947 President Henry Truman Signed the Presidential Succession Act.

July 18, 1955 Disneyland opened in California.

Book 1 tells about it in "Disneyland adventures-(Have your family visited Disneyland? If you have and your children haven't share your experiences with them. If they have with you talk about your memories.) Encourage them to (look) at park maps and souvenirs to enhance their presentations. ...obtain brochures from local travel agents. Share these with (each other), then invite (them) to write about what they'd do if they could spend a day with their favorite Disney character."

July 18, 1971 Brazillian soccer star Pele ended his
career with the Brazillian National Soccer Team.

July 18, 1974 Bob Gibson became the First National
League Pitcher to Strike Out 3,000 Batters in a career.

July 18, 1980 India became The Sixth Nation to Put a Satellite into Orbit.

July is also Read an Almanac Month; therefore, Book (1) has this to say in "Reading the almanac-
Teach (the children) how to locate information in an almanac by using the general index. Have them each identify their favorite hobby, vacation spot, or other topic, then locate it in the almanac. To test their newfound skills, have the kids list and share five facts about their topic that they gleaned from the almanac."



Next is July 19th with the birthdays first:

July 19, 1814 Samuel Colt, American inventor of the Colt revolver, was born.

July 19, 1834 Edgar Degas, French Impressionist Painter, was born.
(Learn about Impressionist Painters here also.)

July 19, 1865 Charles Mayo, American surgeon, was born.

July 19, 1916 Eve Merriam, children's poet, was born.

Book (1) has this to say about it in "Provocative poetry-Read aloud selections from Eve Merriam's It Doesn't Always Have to Rhyme, Blackberry Ink, and The Inner City Mother Goose. Have the children select their favorite poems and pick up Merriam's beat either by drawing pictures to go with the poems or by writing poems to reflect their own neighborhood experiences."

July 19, 1922 George Stanley McGovern, American politician
who ran unsuccessfully for the presidency in 1972, was born.

Book (1) has the following to say about it in "Forgotten politicians?-To mark George McGovern's birthday, have your (children) compile a list of unsuccessful presidential and vice presidential candidates from the second half of the 20th century. Ask each child to research the postelection career of one of these candidates,, then write a one-paragraph summary on an index card. Post the cards on a (poster board or wall) titled"American Politicians: Where Are They Now?""


Next are the following events for July 19th:

July 19, 1812 The United States Declared War On England
over the issue of British interference with American
trade and shipping on the high seas.

July 19, 1848 The First Women's Rights Convention met
in the home of Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

July 19, 1969 John Fairfax arrived in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.,
after Rowing Across the Atlantic.

July 19, 1984 At its convention in San Francisco, the
Democratic Party nominated Geraldine Ferraro for vice
president. It was the first time a woman had been
chosen for a major-party ticket.

July 19, 1985 NASA chose teacher Christa McAuliffe
from among 11,000 applicants to be its first civilian
crew member on a space shuttle.

July 19 is also National Ice Cream Day (third Sunday in July) therefore Book (1) says in "Ice cream poll-To celebrate National Ice Cream Day, have each of your (children) ask at least 10 people the following question: "Does ice cream taste best served in a cone or in a dish?" Encourage (them) to create a pictograph to display the results. As a culminating activity, bring in ice cream, cones, and dishes--and invite your (children) to serve themselves."


Next is July 20th with only two Birthdays:

July 20, 1919 Sir Edmund Hillary, New Zealand explorer and
mountain climber who was the first to reach the summit
of Mt. Everest, was born.

July 20, 1947 Carlos Santana, Mexican rock musician, was born.

Now for July 20th Events:

July 20, 1810 Columbia declared its independence from Spain.

July 20, 1859 Baseball Fans Were Charged Admission (50¢)
for the first time, to see Brooklyn play New York.

Book (1) has an activity for this in "Batting for dollars-Ask your (children) to find out the cost of the cheapest ticket for a major-league baseball game at the park nearest their hometown. Then ask them to calculate the percentage increase in admission price since 1859."

July 20, 1881 Sitting Bull surrendered to federal troops at
Fort Buford in the Dakota Territory.

July 20, 1944 President Franklin Roosevelt was Nominated
for an Unprecedented Fourth Term at the Democratic convention.

July 20, 1964 NASA tested the First Successful Rocket engine.

July 20, 1969 Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz
Aldrin became the First Men to Set Foot on the Moon.

Book (1) writes in "Moon memories-Have your (children) ask their parents or grandparents to recall where they were and what they were doing when astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the moon. Your (children) will themselves remember other historic happenings--including, perhaps, the smashing of the Berlin Wall, the liberation of Kuwait, and the Challenger accident. Have the children each make a chart that consists of historic events they recall and where they were, who they were with, and what they were doing the day each event occurred."

July 20, 1976 The U.S. space probe Viking 1 landed on Mars.

Book (1) says in "Searching for signs of life-After landing on Mars, Viking 1 sent back television pictures of the planet's surface. It also conducted experiments, one of which involved searching for life. The lander scooped up a soil sample, then added certain chemicals to trigger an organic reaction. None was observed. Perhaps Viking 1 wasn't able to recognize what Martian life looks like. or maybe the site was, indeed, devoid of life. Have your (children) discuss what it means to show signs of life. Make a list of places a spacecraft could land on Earth and what signs of life would be found there. Next, make a list of places on Earth that wouldn't show any signs of life--for example, inside a volcano. Take your (children) on an indoor field trip at (home) to search for signs of life. Be sure to include bacteria as a type of life."

July 20, 1985 A diving expedition off the coast of Florida located
the remains of the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha,
sunk in a hurricane in 1622. The expedition recovered $400 Million
in Gold, Silver, and Copper Treasure.

July 20, 1987 Wilma Mankiller became the First Woman
Elected Chief of the Cherokee Nation.

July 20 is also considered Moon Day.


Now we move on into July 21 with the following birthdays:

July 21, 1899 Ernest Hemingway, American novelist, was born.

July 21, 1920 Isaac Stern, Russian violinist, was born.

July 21, 1952 Robin Williams, American comedian and actor, was born.

Book (1) says in "Stand-up comedy-Have your (children) seen Robin Williams on TV or in movies? To celebrate his birthday, ask the kids to choose a favorite comedian. Why do they like him or her? Are there any potential comedians in your (family)? Let those who wish prepare a short comedy skit and perform it in front of the family. Nonperformers might like to join forces with the (family comics) and help write the skits."



Now we will add the events for July 21:

July 21, 1834 The Liberty Bell was Muffled to toll the
death of the Marquis de Lafayette.

July 21, 1861 At the Battle of Bull Run, the first
major encounter of the Civil War, Confederate General
Thomas J. Jackson gained the nickname "Stonewall."

Book (1) writes in "Stonewall and other nicknames-Tell your (children) that Confederate General Thomas J. Jackson earned the nickname "Stonewall" during the first Battle of Bull Run. Despite overwhelming odds, his brigade stood firm--"like a stone wall"--against attacks from Northern troops. Ask your (children) to name other prominent Americans and the actions that have earned them recognition--for example, Alexander Graham Bell, Martin Luther King, Jr. , Sally Ride, Carl Lewis. What nicknames might your students give these people?"

July 21, 1873 Jesse James committed the World's
First Train Robbery, near Council Bluffs, Iowa.

July 21, 1925 Tennessee biology teacher John Scopes was found
Guilty of Teaching the Theory of Evolution, which was against
state law. He was fined $100.

July 21, 1930 The U.S. Veterans Administration was established.

July 21, 1959 The United States launched the Savannah,
the First Nuclear-powered Merchant Ship.

July 21, 1961 U.S. astronaut Virgil Grissom became the
Second American in Space. His flight lasted 16 minutes.

Book (1) says in "Flying in space-To mark the anniversary of Virgil "Gus" Grissom's space flight, turn off the lights in your (home) for 16 minutes. During that time--the length of Grissom's flight--ask your (children) to imagine what they might see or do or think about if they were flying in space. When the lights come back on, have the kids quickly write all their thoughts on scrap paper. Finally, have them use their ideas to write poems about space flight. (Make articles in your family newspapers also.)"

July 21, 1969 Astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin
Returned From the Moon to the command module,
manned by Michael Collins.

July 21 is also National Independence Day in Belgium.




Now we will start on July 22 with the following birthdays:

July 22, 1822 Johann Gregor Mendel, Austrian monk who
discovered the principles of heredity, was born. 

July 22, 1844 William Archibald Spooner, English clergyman
after whom the spoonerism was named, was born.

Book (1) explains in "Sunny flips of the tongue-Have your (children) look up "Spoonerism" in the dictionary. Next, (...challenge competition with your children by taking turns reading aloud a favorite poem. Afterward,...write down your poems, intentionally transpose the initial sounds of some words, Then ...read the spoonerism-filled results.)"

July 22, 1849 Emma Lazarus, American poet who wrote
the sonnet "The New Colossus," which is engraved on
the Statue of Liberty, was born.

July 22, 1881 Margery Williams Bianco, children's author
who wrote The Velveteen Rabbit, was born.

July 22, 1898 Alexander Calder, American artist
considered the originator of the mobile, was born.

Book (1) has the following to say in "Nature mobiles-Share some photographs of Alexander Calder's mobiles with your (children). Then encourage the children to make nature mobiles, " using leaves, twigs, tree bark, and other natural objects. First, take the students for an outdoor walk to gather their objects. Next, ask them to tie or glue their objects pieces of string cut to varied lengths, then tie the strings to coat hangers. Suspend the mobiles from the (home") ceiling."

July 22, 1898 Steven Vincent Benet,  American poet, was born.


Now we well cover the events for July 22:

July 22, 1587 More than 100 English colonists founded a
Second Colony on Roanoke Island off North Carolina, the
site of the first attempted English colony in America.
When supply ships returned 3 years later, the only
trace of the colony was the word Croaton carved on a tree.

July 22, 1796 Moses Cleaveland, a surveyor for the
Connecticut Land Co., founded Cleveland, Ohio.

Book (1) writes "Place names-Tell your (children) that in 1831, the spelling of Cleaveland was changed to Cleveland to better fit into a newspaper headline. What cities, buildings, businesses, schools, or streets in your (children's) area are named after people? Make a class list, and note any changed spellings."

July 22, 1881 In Seattle, Wash., Tom Clancy was Arrested
for Speeding on His Horse. He was riding more than
the legal limit of 6 mph.

July 22, 1933 American pilot Wiley Post completed the
First Solo Air Circumnavigation of the Globe. His flight
took 7 days, 18 hours, and 45 minutes.

July 22, 1975 Congress voted to Restore the American
Citizenship of Robert E. Lee, who had commanded the
Confederate forces during the Civil War.



Now we move onto July 23 starting with the two birthdays as follows:

July 23, 1926 Patricia Coombs, children's author, was born.

July 23, 1929 Robert Quackenbush, children's author, was born.

Not so many events as follows either:

July 23, 1827 America's First Swimming School opened in Boston.

July 23, 1829 William Burt received a patent for his
typographer,a Forerunner of the Typewriter.

July 23, 1903 Ford Motor Co. sold its first car.

Book (1) writes in "Classroom assembly line-Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor co., believed that the average person should be able to own a car. To make this possible, he developed one of the first assembly-line production systems. The assembly line allowed Ford to produce a greater number of cars at a lower price. The process proved so successful that other manufacturers began using it. Have your (children) conduct an experiment to test the effectiveness of an assembly line. Bring in a couple loaves of bread, several jars of Peanut butter and jelly, paper plates, and (a number of) knives. (Use the whole family to form an assembly line.) Tell the (family) that their goal is to make 12 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches as quickly as possible. (Divide up the work and put the jobs to work. Test yourselves with a timer. Than each of you make so many of the same sandwiches do some alone. Does it make it any faster?)"

July 23, 1958 Queen Elizabeth II named four women to the
peerage, making them the First Women members of the House of Lords.

July 23, 1962 Australia's Dawn Fraser became the First
Woman to Swim 100 Meters in Under 1 minute.

July 23, 1986 Britain's Prince Andrew married Sarah Ferguson.
They were titled the duke and duchess of York.

July 23 is also the time for Perseid Meteor Shower (Through mid-August). This is explained in Book (1) under "Seeking shooting stars-Tell your (children) that a meteor (also called a shooting star) is a streak of light in the sky that occurs when a meteoroid--a usually small, solid object from space--enters the earth's atmosphere and burns up. On a dark, moonless night, a careful observer might expect to see five or six meteors per hour. But at certain times of the year, when the orbit of a group of meteoroids intersects the earth's orbit, many more meteors are visible. This is called a meteor shower. Show your (children) a sky chart, pointing out the constellation Perseus and noting how to find it in the nighttime sky. Then encourage your (children) to observe the Perseid meteor shower, which begins about now but peaks around August 12. Tell them to go to a place away from bright lights, find Perseus, and note how many meteors they see in a 15- or 20-minute period."


Next is July 24 starting with the birthdays:

July 24, 1783 Simon Bolivar, South American patriot, was born.

Book (1) explains in "El Libertador-Simon Bolivar was born in Venezuela. As a child, he learned about the French and American revolutions and dreamed of the day his country would achieve independence from Spain. Bolivar became one of South America's greatest generals in the fight against Spain, managing to win independence for Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. Have your (children) locate South America on a world map. Then have them find the countries that were liberated by Bolivar." (This lessons should be infiltrated in the North American revolution history but tied to studies for South America in the Spring, that is why it is good in the summer as well.)

July 24, 1802 Alexandre Dumas, French novelist, was born.

July 24, 1898 Amelia Earhart, American aviator, was born.

July 24, Bella Abzug, American politician and feminist, was born.

Book (1) tells about her in "Women's rights-Tell your (children) that when Bella Abzug was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1970, she pushed vigorously for women's rights. Ask the children to list the kinds of rights women have been fighting for since the 19th century, when women such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony were leading the charge. How has the women's movement progressed? Who are today's prominent feminists?"(A little note of Grandma's opinion here. Grandma is very partial to the dignity of women and the direction they have been led into. Grandma believes women should have all the rights a man has; however, Grandma feels this bit where feminists or business officials, educators, or group of people that feel they know it all and everyone should live a certain way or be a certain way that are controling our world may not be doing the best by us. Grandma feels women should be proud they are women and live up to standards to be as strong as we can being exactly like men or being with many womanly traits God has given us.
Grandma does not feel we have to dress in pants when a dress or skirt was designed to handle our bladder needs better than the design of a man being able to open his pants or slip them down to go in an easier position.
Many men the same as women like the feel and look of satins, ruffles, and sheers. A man is attracted to a women for his neat appearance in more of a rustic dress because they usually like to be doing things outside and rough. Not to say that women at times like to get just as close to the Earth and doing things they can. However, each person must work out a balance with the people they live with and things they like to do. However, to say the only way is to wear jeans or pants and act like a man is the only answer because men really like to be in control and if a women overpasses them they have a tendency to sit back and not want to do anything because they feel she can handle it why not let her and a lot ends up falling on the women that way. I feel fathers and mothers that do not give their girls a chance to be as lovely as the other girls try to rob them of the benefit of being a woman, not to say they want to be loved for how sexy or even sensual they are, but it can be a lot easier on them if they are allowed to have the time with their children if they want to and take care of womanly chores if they want to as well as put make-up on, fix their hair the way they want, or look a little more appealing even though many feel jeans can be sexy. They really can be too tight, or constantly have to be pulled up, or downright sloppy. Dress pants are ok, but when some older women can have so many problems that they have to change a pair of pants to fit in with the crowd, Grandma does not feel comfortable with the crowd bit nor will she ever.
Not all women are born with the strength to handle all the jobs men do as well as some women and I do not feel it should be forced on them. Some men do not want to do all the jobs women have done or like to do. Some men like to see women dressed up sensually occasionally and women like to see men dressed up themselves too. I feel there should be a fair balance made and other women nor men should put one or the other down because they look nice for each other at times. It makes a better relationship in the end. If women don't like dressing up nor men and want to look junky who is to put them down, but business people do frown on a too junky or sexy of a look someone might have, but some of those people hung around others that felt it was all ok.
Grandma got tired of looking junky in a T-shirt and old ragged pants or jeans for work. She learned where she felt comfortable. However, if I am doing something that could ruin my clothes as home or work I definitely wanted old ragged clothes on. If  it is summer and she knows she is going to be hot she wants shorts or something cool on.
Grandma just had to put her 3 cents in. Grandma does not always go to a beautician for her hair or whatever because she has only had a small budget to live on. As I said people should dress the way they feel comfortable at the time, but not have to live a certain form of dress to be considered for a man's job. I do feel they should be considerate of their spouses feelings in the way they dress and understand that if they want to sell a product to the public, the public is not going to change for their feelings, they have to dress presentable in order to be accepted by other people. That does not mean they have to show off with the most expensive or newest fad on the market at the time either. People will always look at the appearance of a stranger selling something unless they are the type that don't care any better than than the person selling. Smaller towns are worse than the bigger cities because of the variety of people to pick from. If many of you disagree maybe our world has us all mental blocked or some women are just trying to hide their own sex problems.)

Now lets do the events for July 24 as follows:

July 24, 1679 New Hampshire became a royal colony of the British crown.

July 24, 1701 Antoine De La Mothe Cadillac founded a fort at the site of Detroit.

July 24, 1847 Brigham Young and his Mormon
followers arrived at the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

July 24, 1866 Tennessee became the First Confederate
state to be readmitted to the Union.

July 24, 1959 U.S. vice president Richard Nixon and Soviet premier
Nikita Khrushchev Debated the Pros and Cons of Capitalism
and Communism on world television.


(Grandma feels this topic should be talked about because,
Soviet Unions idea of Communism was the incomes to be equal but far lower than the officials themselves therefore it left them in more power to decide who belonged there and what they should do.)

July 24, 1977 Dutch rider Henk Vink set a Motorcycle World Record
by covering a 1-kilometer course in 16.68 seconds from a standing start.

July 24 is also Pioneer Day in Utah therefore have some fun with it and it is also National Baked Bean Month in July. Book (1) says in "Best baked beans-Celebrate National Baked Bean Month by having your (friends and/or family) conduct a taste test of various (recipes and/or) brands of canned baked beans. Which brand tastes best? Which tastes worst? Afterward, challenge (the children) to create tongue twisters beginning with: "The best baked beans..."



Now we move onto July 25th beginning with the following birthdays:

July 25, 1750 Henry Knox, American military officer who served
as the first U.S. secretary of war, was born.

July 25, 1911 Ruth Krauss, children's author, was born.

July 25, 1954 Walter Payton, football star who set the NFL
career record for rushing, was born.

July 25, 1978 Louise Brown, the first socalled test-tube baby
(baby conceived through in vitro fertilization, was born.


Next are the events for July 25th:

July 25, 1814 The English inventor George Stephenson
first demonstrated a Steam Locomotive.

July 25, 1866 Ulysses S. Grant became the army's First Five-Star General.

July 25,  1909 The French engineer and aviator Louis Bleriot
made the First Airplane Flight Across the English Channel,
from Calais, France, to Dover, England.

Book (1) writes this in "Flying across the Channel-Tell your (children) that it took Louis Bleriot 37 minutes to complete his 20-mile flight. Help them appreciate Bleriot's aviation milestone by having them re-create it with paper airplanes. Have (the children) work ...to create a scale drawing of England. France, and the English Channel (somewhere else). They can use chalk or masking tape to lay out their design, (making France a good distance away from the drawing of England-maybe a foot 100-200 miles or as far as 500 miles to France.) Have the children mark the sites of Calais, France, and Dover England. Next have them each make a paper airplane. Students can then take turns flying their airplanes "across the Channel.""

July 25, 1934 Franklin Roosevelt became the First President to Visit Hawaii.

July 25, 1952 Puerto Rico's Constitution was proclaimed,
and the island became a self-governing commonwealth of the United States.

July 25, 1971 South African surgeon Dr. Christiaan Barnard Successfully
Transplanted Two Lungs and a Heart into a patient.

July 25, 1984 Soviet cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became
the First Woman to Walk in Space.


July is also Recreation and Parks Month and July 25 of Book (1) says in "Passport to the parks-
The National Park Service offers a national parks passport book. Each time a passport holder visits a national park, the book gets stamped. Make a notebook-size version of this passport book for your students. List each national park or monument your students have visited on a separate page, and ask the kids to find an appropriate illustration or magazine photo. Then have students sign their names under the locations they've visited. Encourage those who will visit national parks or monuments in the future to send postcards for inclusion in the passport book. (Grandma will have some information for this later and she want to cover some of the National Parks in November to go along with the letter N for children.)



Now we will move onto July 26th starting with the birthdays:

July 26, 1856 George Bernard Shaw, British playwright, was born.

Book (1) writes under "Perspectives on teaching-Playwright George Bernard Shaw once observed, "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach. " Share Shaw's quote with your (children). Then share this quote from Christa McAuliffe: "I touch the future; I teach." Ask your (children) which quote they think more accurately describes today's teachers. After they've shared their views, explain quotes to survey family, friends, and community members about their perceptions of teaching."

July 26, 1892 Pearl Buck, American author, was born.

July 26, 1897 Paul Gallico, American author of The Snow Goose, was born.

July 26, 1923 Jan Berenstain, children's author, was born.

July 26, 1943 Mick Jagger, British rock star, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Classroom rock fest-In honor of Mick Jagger's birthday, have a parent-(child) rock fest in your (home). ...find favorite Rolling Stones recordings. (Children and yourself) also can ( find your own favorite artists.) After playing a sampling of the songs, ask ...what they think of the other generation's musical tastes."

Now we will move into the Events:

July 26, 1788 New York became the 11th state.

July 26, 1847 The West African nation of Liberia proclaimed its independence.

July 26, 1889 China's Hwang Ho (Yellow River) flooded, leaving the
surrounding countryside under as much as 12 feet of water.

July 26, 1908 The Federal Bureau of Investigation was created.

July 26, 1920 Oscar Swann, age 72, won a medal in rifle
shooting, thus becoming the Oldest Olympic Medalist.

July 26, 1969 U.S. scientists examined the First Moon Rock Samples.

July 26, 1986 Bicyclist Greg Lemond became the First American
to Win the Tour De France. His time for the 2,500-mile race was
110 hours, 35 minutes, 19 seconds.

(Do some math figuring with this as: How many miles an hour figuring approximately 110 hours into the 2,500 miles equals what?)

July 26 is also Hopi Niman Dance in United States as Book (1) explains it in "Native American legends-Share with your (children) the Hopi Indian legend of the kachinas--supernatural beings who leave their mountain homes for half the year to visit the tribe. The kachinas are believed to bring good health to the people and rainfall for the crops. For the Niman dance, dancers portraying kachinas sing and dance for almost the entire day. Ask your (children) to name other supernatural beings--for example, leprechauns and guardian angels--who some to earth and help people. Then have the children write stories featuring supernatural do-gooders of their own invention."



The next day is July 27th with only two birthdays as follows:

July 27, 1913 Scott Corbett, children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in"Titles of honor-Children's author Scott Corbett fulfilled a longtime wish when he joined two friends for a balloon trip. They traveled from northern Rhode Island to southern Massachusetts. Later, Corbett joked that he could sign his name "Scott Corbett, I.A. (Interstate Aerialist)." Ask your (children) what titles they could give themselves based on their accomplishments. Next, have them fold 8 1/2 x 11-inch sheets of construction paper in half to make "nameplates" for their desks. Have them each write their name and new title on their nameplate."

July 27, 1948 Peggy Fleming, American figure-skating champion, was born.

Now we have the Events for July 27th:

July 27, 1586 Sir Walter Raleigh returned to England bearing
the Virginia colony's first tobacco crop.

July 27, 1775 Benjamin Church was named Surgeon General
of the Continental Army.

July 27, 1789 Congress established the Department of Foreign Affairs,
which later became the State Department.

July 27, 1866 The Fist Underwater Telegraph Cable Between
North America and Europe was completed.

July 27, 1909 Orville Wright set a World Record by staying
aloft in an airplane for 72 minutes and 40 seconds.

Book (1) writes in "It takes teamwork-Tell your (children) that Orville Wright worked together with his brother, Wilbur, to build and fly the first power-driven airplane. Since the Wright brothers worked as a team, how did they decide who would fly the plane on this day in 1909? Ask your (children) to speculate. How do your students think Orville felt during his record-setting flight? How do they suppose Wilbur felt watching from the ground? Have each (child) write a narrative from the perspective of either Orville or Wilbur."

July 27, 1921 Insulin was isolated for the first time.

July 27, 1931 A Swam of Grasshoppers descended on the
states of Iowa, Nebraska, and South Dakota, destroying
thousands of acres of crops.

July 27, 1953 The Korean War ended.

July 27, 1974 The House Judiciary Committee passed its
First Article of Impeachment Against President Richard Nixon.

July 27 is also Take Your Houseplants for a Walk Day and Book (1) has this to say in "Walk the plant?-Today is Take Your Houseplants for a Walk Day. Ask your (children) to suggest a scientific reason why this might be a good thing to do. (Plants remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and generate oxygen.) What whimsical reasons can they suggest?"

(By the way Book (1) has a picture with this insert where the children are walking and the plants are actually walking beside them as humans-a good laugh for the day.)



Next is July 28 with only two following birthdays:

July 28, 1932 Natalie Babbitt, children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in "Character diary-Natalie Babbitt's popular book Tuck Everlasting deals with the theme of searching for oneself. Read it aloud to the (children). As (the children) listen, have them keep a diary of their reactions to Winnie, the main character. Following the story's conclusion, have (the children) make collages to illustrate their reactions. They might include pictures, drawings, words, or other creative ways to capture the essence of a character who faces difficult choices."

July 28, 1943 Bill Bradley, professional basketball player
and U.S. senator, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Looking at Legislators-Before entering politics, Senator Bill Bradley of New Jersey was a basketball star. He earned All-American honors at Princeton University, played on the 1964 U.S. Olympic team, and won two NBA championships with the New York Knicks during a 10-year pro career. Bradley said that his basketball experiences taught him lessons he could apply in his work as a legislator. In particular, he believed, he gained insights into race relations, an issue he frequently spoke on. Ask your (children) to list professions or personal experiences that they believe would prepare a person for a successful career in Congress. Do the kids feel Congress should contain members from diverse backgrounds? Why? Have your (children) write to your state's two U.S. senators, asking each about his or her previous professional experiences."

Now we will cover the events for July 28th:

July 28, 1821 General Jose de San Martin proclaimed
Peru's Independence from Spain.

July 28, 1868 The Fourteenth Amendment defining U.S. citizenship and guaranteeing due process of law, took effect.

July 28, 1914 World War I began when Austria declared war on Serbia.

July 28, 1945 The U. S. Senate ratified the United Nations Charter
by a vote of 90-2.

July 28, 1945 A B-25 Bomber Crashed into the 79th floor of the
Empire State Building.

July 28, 1959 Daniel Inouye of Hawaii became the First
Japanese-American elected to Congress.

July 28, 1973 Six hundred thousand people attended the
Biggest U.S. Rock Concert ever, at Watkins Glenn, N.Y.

Book (1) writes about it in "Concert calculations-Tell Your (children) that 4 years before the Watkins Glen concert, in the summer of 1969, 400,000 people attended another famous rock festival held in New York State. Ask your students to name this event (Woodstock). There were 200,000 more people at the Watkins Glen event than at Woodstock. Have students calculate this difference as a percentage increase."

Lastly:

July 28, 1984 The Summer Olympics Opened in Los Angeles.
Nineteen nations, including the USSR, boycotted.



Moving on into July 29th with Three birthdays:

July 29, 1869 Booth Tarkington, American novelist, was born.

July 29, 1905 Dag Hammarskjold, Swedish diplomat and
second secretary-general of the United Nations, was born.

July 29, 1938, Peter Jennings, Canadian-born TV journalist, was born.

Now we will list the Events and activities for July 29 as follows:

July 29, 1778 A French Fleet Arrived at Rhode Island to help the
American colonists in the Revolutionary War.

July 29, 1958 Congress authorized the National Aeronautics
and Space Administration (NASA).

Book (1) writes here in "What's next for NASA?-As early as 1915, the U.S. government supported organized research on aeronautics. That year, a congressional resolution established the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). By 1958, government officials agreed that NACA's work should be extended to include the region outside earth's atmosphere--and NASA was created. Ask your (children)  to predict how NASA's work will be extended 10 years from now. For example, what other regions or heavenly bodies might be explored? Have each (child) write a science fiction story describing what might happen."
(By the way while Grandma was in Mexico during August we sighted lights in the sky that were not stars or anything normal. They looked like airplane lights but they were not moving like an airplane. They were just there and then disappeared. First it showed in one place then it disappeared and shown in another space and then did the same two or three other places. They said it happens there occasionally. Grandma had never seen anything like it before. It was really strange.)

July 29, 1962 Seventy-five American historians and political scientists Rated U.S. Presidents as "great," "near great," "average," below average," or "failure."

Book (1) writes about it in "Evaluating the presidents-Have your (children) rate all the presidents who've served in their lifetimes using the same scale as the historians and political scientists used in 1962. Ask the kids to cite specific events and presidential decisions to support their ratings."

July 29, 1981 Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer were
married in St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

July 29, 1988 Javier Sotomayor of Cuba became the First
High Jumper to Clear 8 feet.


July 29th is also Chincoteague Pony Penning(last Thursday in July) and Book (1) writes about it in "Where the wold horses are-Tell your (children) that about 150 wild ponies live on Assateague Island in Virginia. These animals are descendants of colonial-era horses. Each year, the ponies are rounded up and made to swim across the inlet to Chincoteague Island, where about 40 of them are sold. Ask (your children) to locate these two islands on a map of Virginia. How far apart are they? invite the kids to speculate on why the ponies are rounded up annually. (With no predators, they would eventually become too numerous for the island's ecosystem to sustain.) (This is a good lesson in Biology for the children.)



Now we will begin July 30 starting with only two birthdays:

July 30, 1863 Henry Ford, American automobile manufacturer, was born.

Book (1) writes in "The family car-In honor of Henry Ford's birthday, ask your (children) to collect data about their families' cars, including how many cars their families own, the makes and models, the colors, and the safety features, such as air bags or antilock brakes. Have (the children) work...to compile their data and design graphs illustrating the results.

July 30, 1947 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Austrian-born
bodybuilder and actor, was born.

Next are the following events for July 30th:

July 30, 1619 The First Representative Assembly in the American Colonies
met at Jamestown, Va., and enacted laws against drunkenness,
idleness, and gambling.

July 30, 1729 Baltimore Town (later Baltimore) was founded by the
Maryland colonial government.

July 30,1909 The United States Bought its First Airplane for $31,250.

July 30, 1919 Missouri farmer Fred Hoenemann got a temporary
injunction Prohibiting Pilots From Flying Over His Farm.

July 30, 1942 President Franklin Roosevelt signed a bill creating
the navy Waves (Women accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service).

July 30, 1952 The Chesapeake Bay Bridge--third longest in the world--opened.

Book (1) writes about it in "Down by the bay-Tell your (children) that the Chesapeake Bay--which is 200 miles long and 4 to 40 miles wide--is the largest inlet on the Atlantic coast of the United States. Have the children locate the Chesapeake Bay on a U.S. Map. Various rivers flow into the bay. Challenge the kids to find as many as they can. (Among the rivers are the James, York, Potomac, Rappahannock, Patuxent, and Susquehanna.)"

July 30, 1956 Congress adopted the motto, "In God We Trust."

Book (1) writes in "National motto- Ask your (children) where the motto "In God We Trust" can be found--for example, on coins and paper currency. Then discuss the concept of mottoes and why they exist. What is your state's motto? Ask each (child) to adopt a personal motto, write it on a sheet of oaktag, and add a personalized border design. Tape the mottoes (onto something to display them.)"

July 30, 1971 Apollo 15 astronauts landed on the moon.
Their mission included deploying a jeeplike vehicle called
a Lunar Rover, which enabled them to explore much more
of the moon's surface.



This is the last day of July and the last day on this blog. Grandma will carry on tomorrow into August. This is also a very special sons birthday.) Therefore, we will start July 31 with the only two birthdays:

July 31, 1803 John Ericsson, Swedish-American engineer
who designed the Monitor, the famous Ironclad Civil War
ship, was born.

July 31, 1930 Robert Kimmel Smith, children's author, was born.

Now moving on into the Events for the day:

July 31, 1498 Christopher Columbus first sighted Trinidad.

July 31, 1790 The First American Patent was awarded to Samuel
Hopkins for his method of making potash, a substance used in
the manufactur

Beginning of July's Summer Lessons

Posted on September 11, 2014 at 1:15 AM Comments comments (30)
These activities are great if they can be utilized next summer because Grandma had so much trouble getting them to you. However, they can be infiltrated in Lessons now as part of lessons about Summer now and beginning activity to start the new year off.
July's big project for the month is all around the observation of July as Anti-Boredom Month. The children are to make lists with you for things that are in "three categories: fun for one, small-group fun, and large-group fun." Ok! So you ask how can I do that when it is only my children and me. There are things first that they know they like to do alone as some reading. There are things as a family or with a few friends you like to do. Then ways of developing friends and bigger groups is if you have lots of neighbor friends, a church that does a lot together, hospitals (especially for children), orphanages, child care homes or centers, old peoples homes or care places, libraries might be helpful, use your imagination, there used to be home school clubs that did some things together(it is an option). Form a favorite sport together. Help your children with this activity as much as possible. You are suppose to form it into a book. I know you can do it. Just try!

"The Monthlong Observances" from Book (1) besides Anti-Boredom Month for July are as follows:
"Blueberry Month
Hitchhiking Month
National Baked Bean Month
National Hot Dog Month
National Ice Cream Month
Picnic Month
Read an Almanac Month
Recreation and Parks Month

Weeklong Events" are as follows:
"Music for Life Week (first week)
Special Recreation Week (first full week)
Be Nice to New Jersey Week (second week)
Space Week (week including July 20)"

And "Special Days and Celebrations
Independence Day (July 4)
Bastille Day (July 14)
National Ice Cream Day (third Sunday)"
(Look into this one with September's)


July 1 has three birthdays as follows:

July 1, 1872 Louis Bleriot, French aviator who became the
first person to fly an airplane across the English Channel, was born.

July 1, 1961 Diana Spencer, princess of Wales, was born this day.

July 1, 1961 Carl Lewis, American track star, was also born.

Events for July 1 are as follows:

July 1, 1847 The First Official U.S. Postage Stamps were issued.

Book (1) writes in "People on postage-When the first American postage stamps were issued, Benjamin Franklin appeared on the 5-cent stamp and George Washington appeared on the 10-cent stamp.  Why do the children think these people were chosen? If postage stamps were being issued or the first time today, what people or images would your (children) want on the stamps? Have them draw and color their own "first issue" stamps."

July 1, 1862 Congress established the Bureau of Internal Revenue.

July 1, 1863 The Civil War Battle of Gettysburg began.

July 1, 1867 The Dominion of Canada was created.

July 1, 1898 Theodore Roosevelt and His Rough Riders
charged up San Juan Hill during the Spanish American War.

July 1, 1941 The First Television Commercial, sponsored by
Bulova Watch, was broadcast in New York.

Book (1) talks about it in "TV selling-Tell your (children) that the first television ad, broadcast on station WNBT in New York, lasted 10 seconds and cost $9. Ask your (children) how much the sponsor paid per minute. At the time, there were 4,000 TV sets in the New York area. If one person was watching each TV set when the commercial aired, how much did the sponsor pay per viewer? Ask the kids to find out how many people watch their favorite program and how much a minute of commercial time on the program costs. Then have them compare these figures with those from the first commercial."

July 1, 1963 The Five-Digit Zip Code was introduced.

July 1, 1971 The Twenty-Sixth Amendment was ratified,
giving 18-year-olds the right to vote.

July 1, 1990 A treaty unifying the Monetary Systems of
East and West Germany became effective.

July 1 is also Canada Day and National Hot Dog Month is given an activity in Book (1) this day
called "Good doggies-Celebrate National Hot Dog Month with a healthy twist. Have (the children) examine labels to determine the fat content and nutritional value of various brands of hot dogs. Then ask the kids to chart their resuls. Afterward, have them create truth-in-advertising poster guides to healthy hot dog eating (which Grandma does not follow too well, but Grandpa doesn't like hot dogs too often). (You can display you poster wherever you wish, for they are good information and Grandma definitely is for eating good food for yourselves, but costs seem to hold us all back on what is good sometimes.)"


July 2 has four birthdays as follows with two activities:

July 2, 1908 Thurgood Marshall, American jurist who became the
first black Supreme Court justice, was born.

Book (1) says in "Early judicial experiences-Tell your (children) that as a boy, Thurgood Marshall frequently got into trouble at school. Ironically, his punishment was to memorize parts of the U.S. Constitution. Marshall once remarked that he'd learned the entire document by heart by the time he graduated. Ask your (children) to write down the career paths they hope to follow. Then have them speculate on which school experiences might influence their future professions."

July 2, 1919 Jean Craighead George, children's author, was born.

July 2, 1951 Jack Gantos, children's author, was born.

July 2, 1964 Jose Canseco, Cuban-born baseball player who
became the first major-leaguer to hit 40 home runs and steal
40 bases in one season.

Book (1) says "40 is fabulous-Have your (children) celebrate Canseco's "40s feat." For the rest of July, have them keep a journal describing 40 things they did or that happened to them during the month. At month's end, have them each list their 40 things in order of greatest significance. Post the lists on a (poster called "Top 40" to post on the wall somewhere.)"

Events for July 2 are as follows:

July 2, 1776 The Continental Congress approved the
Declaration of Independence.

July 2, 1881 President James Garfield was Shot by
Charles Guiteau, a disgruntled office seeker. The
president died of his wounds 80 days later.

July 2, 1932 Franklin Roosevelt accepted the Democratic Party's
nomination for president, pledging a "New Deal for the American People."

July 2, 1964 President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
which guaranteed the enforcement of nondiscrimination in public accommodation,
government facilities, education, and employment.

July 2, 1976 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the
Death Penalty was not cruel or unusual punishment.

July was also recognized as National Ice Cream month on July 2 saying in "Flavorful ice cream-During National Ice Cream Month, have your (children) conduct a ...survey..to find out ...(others) favorite ice cream flavors. Ask them to create a pie chart, table, or bar graph to display their findings. What are the three most popular flavors? Afterward, have the kids brainstorm for all the known flavors of ice cream. Then have them suggest some new and unusual ones--For example, jalapeno pepper, mustard and relish, or anchovy pizza. Have them write descriptive sentences telling what these flavors would taste like. Bring in a gallon of vanilla ice cream and a variety of the (children's) suggested flavorings, then let the kids create. How do their new flavors taste?" 

July 3 only has two birthdays:

July 3, 1878 George M Cohan, American playwright and composer, was born.

July 3, 1962 Tom Cruise, American actor, was born.

The events are almost just as sparing:

July 3, 1608 French explorer Samuel De Champlain founded Quebec.

July 3, 1775 George Washington took command of the
Continental Army in Cambridge, Mass.

July 3, 1863 The Battle Gettysburg ended.

Book (1) explains in "Hallowed ground-The Battle of Gettysburg proved to be one of the most decisive battles of the Civil War as well as a defining moment in the history of the nation. After e days of fighting, during which both sides suffered terrible casualties, the Confederate forces were compelled to retreat, with any realistic hope of winning the war dashed. Have your (children) read about the battle, then imagine themselves as one of the participants, whether a famous commander or a common soldier, Ask the kids to write a letter from participant to family members describing the events at Gettysburg."

July 3, 1890 Idaho became the 43rd state.

July 3, 1991 Mount Rushmore was finally officially
dedicated on its 50th anniversary. Ceremonies in 1
941 had been canceled because of World War II.

July 3 is also noted as Complement Your Mirror Day as Book (1) uses "Mirror, mirror, on the wall-Place a mirror in a corner of your (learning area accessible to the children.) Put several strips of blank paper around the mirror, then encourage the kids to write general compliments on the strips--for example, "What a great smile!" or "You look marvelous! The comments are sure to bring smiles whenever the kids look in the mirror."

July 3 is also used for Stay Out of the Sun Day which Book (1) talks about it in "Harmful rays-Ask your (children) to investigate how the sun's rays affect exposed skin. Then have the kids draw posters and create advertisements ... warning others about the dangers of too much sun. Next, invite the children to design protective hats for people to wear outdoors. You could even challenge them to design hats for animals that spend a lot of time in the sun. For example, what type of hat would an elephant wear to protect those big, floppy ears?"


July 4 in Book (1) comes out with three good activities and lots of birthdays as well as events:
The birthdays are as follows with two good activities:

July 4, 1804 Nathaniel Hawthorne, American novelist, was born.

July 4, 1826 Stephen Foster, American composer, was born.

July 4, 1872 Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States, was born.

July 4, 1900 Louis Armstrong, American jazz musician, was born.

Book (1) also points out and gives an activity in "Celebrating "Satchmo-To celebrate Louis Armstrong's birthday, play "It's a Wonderful World" for your (children). Then, with the music playing in the background, have (the children) tape their impressions of why the world is wonderful or how people can work to make it better."

July 4, 1918 Ann Landers and Abigail Van Buren, twin sisters who each wrote a popular newspaper advice column, were born.

Book (1) tells about them in "Advice for kids- Observe the birthdays of advice columnists Abigail Van Buren and Ann Landers by asking each (child) to write a short letter asking for advice about a typical kid problem. Collect the letters, mix them up, with letters from others or your child and you answer them by searching for the answers. ( Grandma wants to start a column as this herself, maybe you would like to start one in your family newspaper.)"

The events are as follows for July 4:

July 4, 1776 The Continental Congress adopted the
Declaration of Independence.

July 4, 1776 The Continental Congress appointed
Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson
to Design a Seal for the United States.

July 4, 1826 John Adams and Thomas Jefferson--the second and third presidents, respectively--died

July 4, 1831 James Monroe, the fifth president , died.

July 4, 1831 The Song "America" was Introduced at a service at
Boston's Park Street Church.

July 4, 1960 The First 50-Star American Flag was raised at Fort McHenry, Md.

July 4, 1980 Pitcher Nolan Ryan recorded his 3,000th Career Strikeout.

July 4, 1986 The 100th Birthday of the Statue of Liberty was celebrated with the largest fireworks display in U.S. history.

July 4 being Independence Day has an activity of its own in Book (1) as follows:
"Independence posters-Have each of your (children) create an "Independence Day Special Event" poster that features at least five local or national events. The posters' titles should incorporate the theme of independence. Ask local business or community organizations to display the finished posters."


July 5 is booming in the following birthdays:

July 5, 1709 Etienne De Silhouette, French finance minister
who created shadow portraits as a hobby, was born.

July 5 1801 David G. Farragut, first admiral of the U.S. Navy, was born.

July 5, 1810 (P.T.)Phineas Taylor Barnum, American
showman and circus promoter, was born.

Book (1) explains it in "Barnum's gullible public-P.T. Barnum once remarked of American audiences: "There's a sucker born every minute." What do your (children) think Barnum meant? As a follow-up, ask them to listen to TV advertising claims. Do these claims promise benefits they don't back up to entice the public Barnum thought was so gullible? Have the kids complile any wild claims into a class notebook as evidence of the truth of Barnum's maxim."

July 5, 1853 Cecil Rhodes, British statesman and founder of the
Rhodes scholarship, was born.

July 5, 1857 Clara Zetkin, German women's rights advocate and
founder of International Women's Day, was born.

July 5, 1958 Bill Watterson, cartoonist and creator of
"Calvin and Hobbes", was born.

Book (1) writes about it in "Classroom cartoonists-To celebrate the birth of cartoonist Bill Watterson, introduce the children to his two main characters--Calvin and Calvin's stuffed tiger, Hobbes. Read a few "Calvin and Hobbes" comic strips to the children, then ask them if they have any toys or pets they "talk to. Give them a chance to share stories about their secret friends. Then pass out blank storyboards and have the children develop their own comic strips about themselves and these friends."

Next are July 5 events:

July 5, 1811 Venezuela proclaimed its independence from Spain.

July 5, 1865 William Booth founded the East London Revival
Society (Salvation Army).

July 5, 1865 The Secret Service was created by Congress.

July 5, 1892 A. Beard patented the Rotary Engine.

July 5, 1946 The Bikini, designer Louis Read's shocking
new bathing suit, was first modeled.

Book (1) explains in "Bold bathing suits-Invite students to
follow in bikini designer Reard's pen lines by drawing and
coloring their own 21st-century bathing suits."

July 5, 1984 The Statue of Liberty's Torch was removed for repairs.

July 5ths Be Nice to New Jersey Week is also brought out in Book (1) through "State studying-During Be Nice to New Jersey Week, encourage your (children) to read up on the Garden State. Then post a sheet titled "Neat things about New Jersey." Each day, invite students to write down something interesting or unusual they learned about the state."


July 6 is just as interesting beginning with some interesting birthday's:

July 6, 1747 John Paul Jones, Revolutionary War hero often
called "the Father of the U.S. Navy", was born.

July 6, 1866 Beatrix Potter, children's author, was born.

Book (1) talks about her in "Thinking and talking animals-All of the animals in Beatrix Potter's stories have anthropomorphic qualities. Have your (children) look up the word anthropomorphic in the dictionary
Then invite them to tell about times when their pets (or other animals) have appeared to act like humans. Afterward, have the children write and illustrate stories about animals imbued with human qualities."

July 6, 1907 Dorothy Clewes, children's author, was born.

Then we are given the events for July 6:

July 6, 1776 The Declaration of Independence was announced
on the front page of the Pennsylvania Gazette.

Book (1) writes in "A dangerous document?-After reading the Declaration of Independence, some people called it a dangerous document. Ask your (children) why people might have felt this way. Next, ask them to imagine that they were living in 1776. Would they have agreed with the sentiments expressed in the Declaration of Independence or remained loyal to the king? Have them write their reactions in their journals (and possibly share them later.)"

July 6, 1885 Louis Pasteur administered the first successful
antirabies inoculation to a boy who'd been bitten by a rabid dog.

July 6, 1919 A British dirigible became the First Airship to Cross the Atlantic.

July 6, 1933 Babe Ruth hit the First Home Run in an All-Star Game.

Book (1) writes in "Making baseball history-Even before he hit the first home run in an All-Star game, Babe Ruth had made baseball history. During the 1927 season, he hit a record 60 home runs. In 1929, his salary climbed to $80,000 a year--more than the president of the United States earned. When Ruth was criticized for making more than the president, he reportedly quipped, "Why not? After all, I had a better year than he did." Have your (children) discuss what this story tells about American society. Then have them debate this question: Does America reward its sports and entertainment stars with too much money and fame? Encourage the kids to use concrete examples to bolster their arguments."

July 6, 1945 Nicaragua became the First Country to Accept
the United Nations Charter.

July 6, 1954 Elvis Presley made his first record.

July 6, 1989 A study was released that found Dangerously High Cholesterol Levels in one-third of American adults.


July 7 gets very busy with events but it only has a few birthdays as follows:

July 7, 1887 Marc Chagall, Russian-French artist noted for
his dreamlike paintings, was born.

July 7, 1906 Satchel Paige, American baseball pitcher, was born.

July 7, 1940 Ringo Starr, English musician and
member of the Beatles, was born.

Now begin the events:

July 7, 1861 The First Torpedo Attack of the Civil War took place.

July 7, 1923 Warren Harding became the First U.S. President to Visit Alaska.

July 7, 1936 Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind was published.

July 7, 1958 President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Alaska Statehood Bill.

July 7, 1972 NASA announced Plans to Collect Solar Energy to be
used as a power source on earth.

Book (1) writes in "Solar Experiment-Tell your (children) that solar heaters typically consist of a black panel containing tubes through which water circulates. The sun heats the water as it moves through the tues, and the hot water provides heat for buildings or homes. Ask your (children) why the panels are black. (Black absorbs heat.) Then have them conduct this simple experiment. Take two empty, same-size tin cans and paint the outside of one can black. Fill both cans halfway with cold water, then place them outside in the sun. Take the temperature of the water in both cans every 15 minutes. Students will find that the water in the black can becomes warmer faster."

July 7, 1985 German tennis star Boris Becker, age 17, became t
he Youngest player to Win the Wimbledon Singles Championship.

July 7, 1986 Charles Stocks played 711 Holes of Golf in 24 hours.

Book (1) writes in "Par for the course-Have your (children) calculate the average number of holes Charles Stocks played per hour, then round that number to the nearest hundredth. Then ask them to figure this out: If a round of golf consists of 18 holes, how many rounds did he play per hour? How does this number compare with the average number of holes played per hour?"

July 7, 1988 Eleven-year-old Christopher Lee Marshall
began his Flight Across the Atlantic. He followed the
course of his hero, Charles Lindbergh.

July 7 is also the day of other happenings as Tanabat in Japan but Video Games Day in which Book (1) explains in "Video hits-Help your (children) practice concise writing by having them each write just one paragraph to explain their favorite video game. Invite them to share their work with (others)."
It is also Fiesta De San Fermin as Book (1) writes in "Spanish stampede-Each year in July, the city of Pamplona, Spain, honors its patron saint, San Fermin, with an 8-day festival.The highlight of the festival comes when adventurous men run through the cobbled streets to the bullring--pursued by a group of bulls. Have your (children) write a short, humorous poem about the running of the bulls."


July 8 has only three birthdays also as follows:

July 8, 1838 Count Ferdinand Von Zeppelin, German pioneer
in lighter-than-air vehicles and the first builder of dirigibles.

Book (1) writes in "Airships and ads-Tell your (children) that dirigibles are also known as airships, blimps, or zeppelins (in honor of Count von Zeppelin). These vehicles have been used for passenger travel, scientific exploration, and warfare. For example, during World War II, Germany used zeppelins in air raids against Great Britain. Do your (children) know what dirigibles are commonly used for today? (Blimps are often used for advertising.) Ask your (children) to imagine they could advertise their favorite book on a blimp. What would their slogans say? Have the kids write their slogans on construction-paper blimps, then hang the blimps from the ceiling of the (house)."

July 8, 1918 Irwin Hasen, American cartoonist who created the
Green Hornet and the Green Lantern, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Green Hornet spin-offs-To celebrate Irwin Hasen's birthday, invite your (children) to create a cartoon using a colorful insect of their choice as the main character. Students can create either comic strips or a single-box cartoon and use balloons for dialogue."

July 8, 1932 Russell Everett Erickson, children's author, was born.

July 8 has several events as follows:

July 8, 1497 Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama set sail from
Lisbon. His journey established a Sea Route to India via the
southern tip of Africa.

July 8, 1629 King Phillip IV of Spain sent King Charles I of England a Gift of Five Camels and One Elephant.(Now Grandma would do some things with this one as write about the Elephant and other gifts kings might have given each other.)

July 8, 1776 The Liberty Bell Rang Out in Philadelphia to
announce the adoption of the Declaration of Independence.

July 8, 1776 The Declaration of Independence was Read
to the Public for the First Time at Philadelphia's Independence Square. 

July 8, 1835 The Liberty Bell Cracked while being tolled during the
funeral procession of Supreme Court Justice John Marshall.

July 8, 1911 Nan Jane Aspinwall became the First Woman to
Cross the United States on Horseback. She covered
4,500 miles in 301 days.

Book (1) writes in "A long time in the saddle-To mark the day Nan Jane Aspin wall completed her horseback crossing of the United States, give your (children) some Math problems based on this equine odyssey. If Aspinwall rode 4,500 miles in 301 days, how many miles per day did she average? At the same pace, how long would it have taken her to ride 5,000 miles? How far would she have gone if she had ridden for a full year?"

July 8, 1976 Gerald Ford, who had assumed the presidency upon
the resignation of Richard Nixon, announced his plans to seek reelection.


July 9th has only one birthday:

July 9, 1819 Elias Howe, American inventor of a
lockstitiching sewing machine, was born.

The events are as follows:

July 9, 1755 General Edward Braddock was Fatally Wounded
during an attack in the French and Indian War. His aide,
George Washington, escaped injury.

July 9, 1776 General George Washington summoned his troops
to New York for a Reading of the Declaration of Independence.

July 9, 1816 Argentina declared its independence from Spain.

Book (1) writes in "Where in the world?-Have your (children) find Argentina and Spain on a world map. Then ask: In which hemispheres--and on which continents--are these two countries located? What body of water separates them? What is the capital of each country? How far is it from capital to capital?"

July 9, 1850 President Zachary Taylor Died while in office.

July 9, 1872 The Donut Cutter was patented by J.F. Blondel.

July 9, 1877 America's First Telephone Company,
Bell Telephone Company, was founded.

July 9, 1893 Surgeon Daniel Hale Williams performed the
First Successful Surgical Closure of a Heart Wound.

July 9, 1979 Voyager 2 passed Jupiter, returning photographs and scientific data.

Book (1) writes in "Mother Earth's music-Tell your (children) that Voyager 2 is one of two U.S. space probes that were launched in 1977. (The other probe is Voyager 1.) Besides their scientific instruments, both probes were equipeed with special records called "Sounds of Earth"-- in case of discovery by another civilization. ...make a list of the kinds of sounds your (children) would include on such a record. What would these sounds tell others about the earth and its inhabitants? Are there any particular sounds your students would not want to include? Why?"

July being Picnic Month Book (1) set it up for this day to present the following activity called "Pretend picnic-One day this month, plan an imaginary picnic for the characters in a book your (children) have recently read. Encourage the kids to consider the characters' likely tastes in food, attire, and games. The children may also want to develop a "guest list" including compatible characters from other books. Assemble their ideas into a booklet."
(Grandma suggests planning at least one picnic as a family and doing as much adventuring of the outside as possible. Do as much research as you can of the area you pick.)


July 10 is another full day starting with the following birthdays:

July 10, 1834 James Abbot McNeil Whistler, American painter, was born.

July 10, 1875 Mary McLeod Bethune, American educator, was born.

July 10, 1882 Ima Hogg, American philanthropist, was born.

July 10, 1885 Mary O'hara, children's author, was born.

July 10, 1916 Martin Provensen, children's author and illustrator, was born.

July 10, 1926 Fred Gwynne, actor and children's author, was born.


Book (1) writes in "Playing with words-Besides writing and illustrating children's books, Fred Gwynne is an award-winning stage, film and television actor. (Your (children) may recall on of his TV roles--Herman in "The Munsters.") Gwynne's most popular children's books are those on wordplay. In The King Who Rained, he illustrates the humorous results of using the wrong homophone or homonym. Have students look up the meanings of homophone and homonym. Then ...collect as many homophones or homonyms as possible in a week. At week's end, have the (children) create a silly (illustrations) depicting the literal meaning of (sentences) that misuses (some of these) words. Post the illustrations on (a poster.)"

July 10, 1943 Arthur Ashe, American tennis player, was born.

Now for the events of July 10:

July 10, 1220 London Bridge was damaged by fire and fell down.

July 10, 1853 Vice President Millard Fillmore assumed the
presidency upon the death of Zachary Taylor.

July 10, 1890 Wyoming became the 44th state.

Book (1) says in "What's in Wyoming-Wyoming, the 44th state, may have been among the last states to join the Union, but it has experienced more than its share of firsts. For example, Wyoming is home to our nation's first national park, Yellowstone, and to the first national monument, Devils Tower, Have your (children) locate Wyoming on a map, then find its capital, Cheyenne. In what part of the state is this city located? Next, ask the kids to use compass directions to describe the location of Yellowstone Park and Devils Tower in relation to Cheyenne and in relation to each other."

July 10, 1913 Death Valley, Calif., reached a temperature
of 134º F in the Shade--the highest ever recorded in the United States. 

July 10, 1929 Congress made official the current Size of U.S. Paper Money.

July 10, 1962 Telstar 1, the first satellite to relay TV and
telephone signals, was launched.

July 10, 1973 The Bahamas gained its Independence from Britain.

July 10, 1991 Boris Yeltsin was Inaugurated as president of Russia.


Next is July 11

Birthdays:

July 11, 1767 John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States, was born.

July 11, 1838 John Wanamaker, American merchant, was born.

July 11, 1899 E.B White, American essayist and children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in "Creating characters-Tell your (children) that a dream inspired author E.B. White to create his famous mouse character, Stuart Little. Then ask each child to create an animal character to be born or adopted into the child's own family. Next, have the kids write stories involving the reaction of their new family member to home life. Feature the stories at a (family) read-aloud."

July 11, 1929 James Stevenson, children's author, was born.

Events:

July 11, 1798 The U.S. Marine Corps was created by an act of Congress.

July 11, 1804 Vice President AAron Burr Fatally Wounded
Alexander Hamilton, the former Treasury secretary, in a pistol duel.

July 11, 1892 The U.S. Patent Office decided that J.W. Swan,
not Thomas Edison, was the Inventor of The Electric-Light
Carbon for the incandescent lamp.

July 11, 1934 Franklin Roosevelt became the First
President to go through the Panama Canal.

July 11,1955 The New Air Force Academy was dedicated at
Lowry Air Force Base in Colorado.

July 11, 1975 Chinese archaeologists announced the discovery,
in Shensi Province, of a 2,000-year-old burial mound containing
6,000 Life-Size Clay Statues of Warriors.

July 11, 1977 Kitty O'Neil set a Women's Power Boat Speed Record--275 mph.

July 11, 1984 The U.S. Department of Transportation ruled
that Air Bags or Automatic Seat Belts would be mandatory
on all American-made cars by 1989.

July 11, 1985 Pitcher Nolan Ryan recorded his 4,000th Career Strikeout.

For National Cheer Up the Lonely Day, Book (1) writes under "Only the lonely-Involve your (children) in National Cheer Up the Lonely Day. First, ask them to name individuals or groups of people who may be lonely, such as senior citizens, widows, widowers, disabled people, and hospital patients. Next, have the children brainstorm for ways to cheer these people up. For example, the children might suggest giving flowers or cards to hospital patients, delivering meals to elderly shut-ins, or organizing a sing-along at a local senior citizen enter. (Form) into "Children's cheer Squad," and have each ...select a "mission" from the list of ideas. Enlist ...volunteers (if you can) to help. Your (children) will not only be involved in a worthy project, they'll also derive great pride in being part of a caring community."

Then under World Population Day Book (1) says under "Population study-On World Population Day, have your (children) look up the meaning of the word demography. Then have them conduct a brief demographic study of (children) in their grade level. How many boys and girls are there? What are their ages? What ethnic backgrounds do they represent? Graph the results."

(Grandma is going to have to stop here.She will type some more tomorrow.)









More of June and the Circus

Posted on September 3, 2014 at 11:48 AM Comments comments (52)

We left off in the History Calendar of Book (1) towards the end of June 15. The rest of the day into the 16th and 17th Grandma will cover along with lessons on the Circus in Book (1) and Book (57). Before lessons I want to add a note to parents in our Home Education Program of home schooling a few pointers. That is to make sure you have a line of some kind set up to attach notes of history on beginning with the time of dinosaurs and man through the Bible and into American History along with space for any other history needed. These will take up a lot of space so be prepared. Then make sure you have a big calendar set up-a poster one is best-for birthdays, weather notations and notes necessary for lessons. Also have an area for pretend news and weather broadcasts; along with plays and puppet shows, or doll play of roles. Act out role plays of characters if wish in these areas. The same place can be used for dance and exercise. Next have a place for writing, drawing and other forms of art. You may want a separate space for sewing and one for hand sewing. Also provide a place for books and supplies. You may want these areas marked as in Day Cares. Also provide plenty of space for lists or posters and projects for words and sounds to learn. Notebooks can also do a lot.( Grandma will also make a note of this on the Home page.)
Now Grandma will give you the beginning summer lessons as follows:

June 15 1904 Mary McCann Helped Save 20 People after the
steamship General Slocum caught fire in New York's East River.

Book (1) says in "Young heroine-While recovering from the measles in a New York City hospital over-looking the East River, 14-year-old Mary McCann saw a steamboat on fire. Still feverish, she ran to the river and yelled encouragement to the people floundering in the water. Her courageous act helped save 20 people, including nine children, and she was awarded the Silver Lifesaving Medal by the U.S. Congress. Invite your (children) to design their own ...medal to commemorate heroic deeds. Then, over the next month, have students clip and share newspaper articles about people who have helped others. Encourage the kids to write letters congratulating these people and to include copies of the class-designed medal."

June 15, 1988 General Motors Corp.'s Sunracer established a Speed Record for Solar-Powered Cars. Its top speed: 48,712 mph.

June 15 is also A Friend in Need is a Friend Indeed Day as well as a Smile Power Day in which Book (1) says in "Miles of smiles-Here's a fun way to celebrate Smile Power Day. In the center of a large sheet of paper, write the words "It's Great to Smile Because..." Post the paper in the hallway or outside your (bedroom) door. Then encourage (the children) to use this "graffiti-style" message center to complete the sentence."


June 16 has only two birthday's as follows:

June 16, 1890 Stan Laurel, English comedian, was born.

June 16, 1920 John Howard Griffin, American
photographer and author of Black Like me, was born.

The Events for June 16, are as follows:

June 16, 1497 Amerigo Vespucci claimed he sighted
the mainland of America on this day.

June 16, 1836 Arkansas became the 25th state.

June 16, 1858 Abraham Lincoln made his famous
"House Divided" speech in Springfield, Ill.

June 16, 1897 The Alaska Gold Rush began.

June 16, 1922 The First Helicopter Flight took place in College Park, Md.

June 16,  1939 Hundreds of Tiny Frogs fell on Trowbridge, England.

June 16, 1963 Lieutenant Valentina Tereshkova of the
Soviet Union became the First Woman in Space.

June 16, 1980 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Scientists
Who Developed New Forms of Life in laboratories could
patent their creations.

June 16, 1987 The Dusky Seaside Sparrow became extinct.

Book (1) says in "Vanishing wildlife-Tell your (children) that on this day in 1987, the last dusky seaside sparrow died in a wildlife preserve at Walt Disney World in Florida. Then encourage the kids to take steps to protect animals for the future. Have each child research an extinct animal, draw a picture of the animal, and write a one-paragraph report about it. Next. have the (children) each write a letter to their state or federal representative telling about their animal and asking for help in saving other wildlife. Have the children include their drawings and reports with the letters. Make copies for a ... display entitled "The Extinct Zoo...What You Can Do About It." Add any responses your students receive to the display."

June 16, 1988 A China Shop Owner decided to find out
what a bull in a china shop would really do.

Book (1) says in "Risky business-Grant Burnett, a china shop owner in New Zealand, always wondered what a bull would do in a china shop. He borrowed Colonel, a 2,000-pound Hereford, and let the animal roam around the store for 3 hours. Burnett risked thousands of dollars' worth of dishes, but Colonel didn't break a thing. Ask your (children) to think of other descriptive animal phrases (for example, eyes like a hawk, quiet as a mouse, fish out of water, hold your horses, sly as a fox, clam up, dead as a dodo). Have them each select a phrase, then illustrate its literal and figurative meanings. Afterward, read aloud Eve Merriam's poem "Cliche," which deals with figurative and literal language. Then ask your students to write poems about their animal subjects."

June 16 is also South Africa's Soweto Day and Korea's Tano.

Next is June 17th with three birthdays as follows:

June 17, 1870 George Cormack, inventor of Wheaties cereal, was born.

Book (1) says in "Breakfast favorites-To celebrate the birthday of George Cormack, inventor of Wheaties cereal, poll your (family to see if any of you) have eaten Wheaties. Do (you ) eat it regularly? Why or Why not? Next , invite your (children) to each name their favorite cereal, Then use three adjectives to describe its taste. List all the adjectives on the board (or a piece of paper.) How many different ones are there?"

June 17, 1882 Igor Fyodorovich Stravinsky, Russian-American composer, was born.

June 17, 1898 M.C. Escher, German mathematician, was born.

Next come the events for June 17 as follows:

June 17, 1579 Sir Francis Drake landed on the California coast.

June 17, 1682 William Penn founded the City of Philadelphia.

June 17, 1775 The Battle of Bunker Hill, one of the earliest
engagements of the Revolutionary War, was fought near Boston.

June 17, 1856 The First Republican Party National
Convention took place in Philadelphia, Pa.

June 17, 1873 Susan B Anthony was fined $100
for voting in the 1872 presidential election.

June 17, 1925 The First National Spelling Bee was held.

Book (1) says in "Cooperation bee-Hold a cooperative spelling bee in your (home0. ....--without using dictionaries--work together to correctly spell words you call out. Give each...a point for each correctly spelled word. The (one) with the most points at the end of a specified period wins."

June 17, 1972 Five burglars were arrested at the
Democratic Party headquarters in Washington, D.C.
The break-in and subsequent cover-up, which came
to be called Watergate after the building where the
burglary occurred, ultimately led to the resignation
of President Richard M. Nixon.

June 17, 1979 Richard Brown set a prone-position
Skateboard Speed Record of 71.179 mph on a
course at Mr. Baldy, Calif.

June 17, 1991 President Zachary Taylor's Remains
Were exhumed (141 years after his death) in
Louisville, Ky., to investigate the theory that
he had been poisoned. No evidence was found to
support the theory.

June 17 is also Independence Day in Iceland and it is used to mention that June is Carnival and Circus Month.

Book (1) says in "Celebrating the circus-Tell your (children) that the circus originated in ancient Rome, where it was a place for chariot races and combat between gladiators. Then have the children look up the origin of the word circus. (Its Latin meaning is "circle.") Next, have students brainstorm for the kinds of acts and performers found in modern-day circuses--for example, dancing elephants, trapeze artists, clowns, jugglers, bareback riders. Ask children who've been to a circus to describe the acts they saw. Finally, have your (children) imagine they could be a circus performer or a day, and ask them to write and illustrate stories about what they'd do."

Book (57) uses the following unit to tell about it:

  1. "The Circus Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow by Pat O'Brien

Historically, the circus has been around for a long time. Performers doing acrobatic stunts appear in Egyptian wall paintings. Marco Polo reported being entertained by jugglers and tumblers in the court of Kublai Khan.
Early people caught and trained wild animals. While most of these were used for religious ceremonies, others became part of a menagerie kept to showcase rare and unusual species. In Rome, the circus Maximus, a large animal theater for chariot racing, also presented trick riders, familiar with today. The show is made up of clowns, acrobats, animal acts, and colorful spectacles.
The purpose of this unit is to explore the circus world from the known to the unknown. You will compare the training of pets to the preparation of wild animal acts. You will proceed from climbing about on the jungle gym to learning about flying through the air. You will learn how clowns advance from being accidentally funny to working on routines and tricks to entertain an audience.

The Circus World
In the winter, the circus community prepares for the coming year. New acts are developed and perfected, while old ones are practiced and improved. Trainers work with their animals. Acrobats and aerialists stay in shape rehearsing their acts and trying new routines. Clowns create new tricks.
On the road, circus performers travel from one location to the next, thrilling audiences with circus magic.
  1. Research the history of the circus. Discover an interesting way to share your findings with the class.
  2. Write five reasons for circuses.
  3. Make a diorama showing a circus scene. ( Or design a scene in a big box or on a table.)

Presenting...
Because of his ideas, leadership, and inspiration, P.T. Barnum influenced the circus world. Read to find out about his contributions to the circus.
  1. List five or more events from his life.
  2. Make a  (separate) time line to show when these incidents happened.
  3. Using the information on the time line, make a filmstrip showing the highlights of his life.
          (Also a good thing to put in your newspaper.)

Clown Alley
A clown's job is to make others laugh by doing tricks, acting, and wearing funny clothes. In the circus, clowns entertain and fill in while the next acts are being set up or when something goes wrong. From makeup to funny shoes, each clown develops a unique look.
  1. If possible, ask a local clown to talk to the (children) about how clowns apply makeup and put together a routine.
  2. Clowns often practice the art of mime. A mime uses gestures and actions rather than words. See if you can perform a routine without speaking.(One of my most happiest time was when my sister and her friend dressed up as clowns and put on an act for myself and other children of the neighborhood. It was really a fun day.)
  3. Clown College offers courses in the history and art of clowning. There are also classes in makeup, mime, using and making props, juggling, and other talents useful to clowns. (For information, write to Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Clown College, 1401 Ringling Drive, South Venice, FL, 33595.) (This may not be possible any more because they have had to quit from what I heard on the Channel 6 News in Omaha, NE )                                                              a.      if you think you have a future as a clown, what are your qualifications?
                          b.      Write a letter to the Clown College stating your talents. Ask for an application to the school. (This will be a practice letter since you have to be at least seventeen years old to enroll.)                                                                                                                          c.       What questions do you think an application for Clown College would ask?
  1. Write a paragraph telling why you would like to be a circus clown.
  2. Write a poem about a clown with alternating line: I seem to be....But I really am.....

Presenting...
Throughout the years, there have been famous circus clowns. Find out more about one of them and write his or her biography. Focus on what he or she has accomplished as a clown. Share and compare the lives of these clowns to see if you can find some lives of these clowns to see if you can find some common traits. Put together a clown bulletin board (or a poster).

Imagine That!
As a circus performer, write your autobiography explaining what made you decide to become a clown. Tell about your act. What's hardest about being a clown? What do you like best? What you're not performing. what do you do? Be sure to include a self-portrait showing you in costume.

Art Activities
  1. Have a partner trace around you on a large sheet of paper. Use the outline to make a life-sized clown. (Butcher paper is good for this.) Use the outline to make a life-sized clown. With markers, paint, or crayons, add details of the clown's costume and face.
  2. On a piece of cardboard, draw a clown. Use paint, scraps of cloth, and yarn to complete the costume and face.
  3. Draw a clown face on a paper plate and decorate it.
  4. Construct a clown puppet.

Be a Circus Clown
  1. Learn to juggle. Begin with bean bags or inexpensive chiffon scarfs then progress to tennis balls.
  2. Plan your costume and special clown face.
  3. Create and practice a routine.

Mainly Mammals

The circus presents wild and exotic animal shows to the public. Before zoos became popular, this was the only opportunity people had to see elephants, lions, and tigers. Today there is a need to provide protection for these rare animals whose natural habitats are threatened. Circus animals are cared for, provided with food, and given medial attention.

You Make the Choice
  1. List the pros and cons of using rare and exotic animals in the circus.
  2. As an animal rights activist, what stands do you take?
  3. As an (environmentalist), what are your thoughts?

Calling All Pets
To better understand the task of a wild animal trainer, consider the care necessary to maintain a domestic animal.
  1. What care do you give your pet? What kind of food does it get and how much?
  2. If you have a pet, teach it a trick. What trick do you want the animal to perform? How will you go about teaching it? Keep a record of your instructions.
  3. Present an oral report to explain how you trained your pet, teach it a trick. What trick do you want the animal to perform? How will you go about teaching it? Keep a record of your instructions.
  4. Compare your method with one used by a classmate.

Trainers and Trainees
A bond of mutual trust is established between the trainer and the animals.
  1. List the responsibilities of a circus trainer. What jobs would he or she be expected to do?
  2. What traits should a wild animal trainer have? Are they any different than those needed to train a domestic animal?
  3. How do you think circus performers go about training wild animals?
  4. List animals that appear in the circus. Select one type of wild animal. What kind of care and attention does it get? What kind of food? How much exercise?
  5. Compare caring for and training a pet to getting a wild animal ready to perform in an act.
  6. Compare caring for and training a pet to getting a wild animal ready to perform in an act.
  7. Write an essay about wild animals in general and circus animals in particular.
  8. Write the life story of a circus animal.

Presenting
Gunther Gebel-Williams, now retired, was a world famous animal trainer with the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus.
  1. Read to find out more about his life as a trainer. How did he prepare the animals to perform?
  2. Pretend you are an interviewer on a television show. Think of some questions you would like to ask Gunther Gebel-Williams. How do you think he would respond? Write a script and practice the interview with a partner.

Imagine That!
  1. If you ran the circus, what animals would perform?
  2. Using your imagination, write a resumé stating your qualifications to be a wild animal trainer.
  3. Write about how it feels to be a lion tamer. What's the hardest part?
  4. If you were an elephant, or another animal, would you rather be in a circus or a zoo? Why?
  5. Would you rather be a veterinarian in a zoo or a circus? Why?

Problem Solving
The many animals in the circus need a great deal of food each day. At every stop along the route, fresh fruits, vegetables, and grains are purchased from local merchants.
  1. Given the following information about weekly purchases, what story problems can you create?     10 tons of hay, 150 bales of straw, 1,000 pounds of meat, 400 crates of carrots, 1 crate of apples, 1 box of bananas, 500 loaves of bread
  2. Write additional imaginative problems using circus facts and figures.

Poems
Search for poems about animals that perform in the circus.                               
      a. Choose one to illustrate.
      b. Memorize it and recite it for the (family).
      c. Present it as a choral reading.

Art Activities
  1. Make papier-mâché animals. Display them in colorful wagons.
  2. Design circus animal pins from clay.
  3. Use magnetic tape to make refrigerator magnets.
  4. Make a mobile featuring circus animals.

Circus Animals
  1. Plan a pet parade. You and your pet can march around a ring in time to recorded circus music.
  2. Does your pet know a special trick? Prepare a "wild animal" act to present to an audience.


Fabulous Flights

They fly through the air, walk on wires, or tumble in the ring. They perform feats of strength, balance, and courage. They are acrobats, aerialists, and flyers.
  1. If possible, read A Very Young Circus Flyer, by Jill Krementz. A young boy, a member of a family of flyers, tells about his life with the circus.
  2. Begin by moving to music. Feel the rhythm.
  3. Depending on the equipment available, practice moving on bars and rings. Tumble on mats.

Poetry in Motion
  1. List words (verbs) that describe the ways a performer moves as he or she flies through the air or tumbles in the ring. Arrange the words to create a motion poem that reflects the movements of the performer.
  2. Add to the words on the list and group them to compose a motion poem.
  3. Write ...about an acrobat's performance.

Presenting...
Jules Leotard invented and introduced the flying trapeze. Like many inventors, he made his discovery accidentally.
  1. Read to find out how this invention changed circus performances.
  2. If Leotard kept a journal during the time he was developing the flying trapeze, what would he have written? Write five journal entries from his point of view.
  3. Can you think of something you might invent to improve a way of doing something? Explain what you want to improve and write about your plan. Include a sketch of your idea.

Circus Flyers and Tumblers
  1. Using playground equipment (bars, rings, the jungle gym, etc.), develop an acrobatic routine set to music. Include gymnastic tumbling and balancing. Make sure the exhibition of physical fitness is safe and entertaining.
  2. Tie-dye a shirt for the performance or use fabric markers to design a T-shirt.

The Day the Circus Came to Town
Read Dr. Seuss' If I Ran the Circus and decide how you would run a circus. Write a book with the same title, but use your own circus.
  1. Study a map of your state. What cities would your circus visit?
  2. Plan a route you would follow from town to town.
  3. Write a news story about the arrival of the circus.
  4. Make posters advertising the performances.
  5. Write a review of the show. Tell about the acts that people will be viewing.

Art Activities
  1. Think about the word circus. Study each letter. What does it remind you of? Design an alphabet with a circus theme.
  2. Use thumbprints to create a circus scene. Make a print and add lines to complete the figures.

Circus Performance
After studying the different facets of the circus, it is time to put the parts together and present your own show.
  1. Display posters to announce the circus.
  2. To begin the Make-a-Circus extravaganza, organize a parade of costumed performers. March to recorded circus music. Include a marching kazoo band.
  3. Sell popcorn and balloons.

Ants as Insects

Posted on September 2, 2014 at 3:25 AM Comments comments (43)
Grandma is making this section separate because there was quite a bit on the Insect part and there is quite a bit here. The part on ants is as follows:


                            " Those Amazing Ants! by Becky Daniel and Jo Jo Cavalline

Did you know that there are more than 10,000 different kinds of ants?

I may be hard to believe, but some ants can lift more than fifty times their own weight.
How much do you weigh? Multiply your weight by fifty. Think of something that weighs about the same as fifty times your weight. Draw a picture of this object.
If you were built like an ant, you could pick up that heavy object. put it above your head, and run with it. Amazing, isn't it?
Draw a cartoon of yourself lifting the object that is fifty times your weight.

Ants have a keen sense of smell and can find food my following a scent trail.
You, too, can follow a scent trail. Using an old bottle of perfume, have (someone) make a scent trail by dripping perfume on (something above the ground level ). Blindfolded, and on your hands and knees, try to reach the end of the trail by using your sense of smell.

Ants have compound eyes. Compound eyes allow them to precisely determine the angle of the sun's rays. This awareness of the sun's angle allows ants to navigate over unknown territory and return with food to their nest.
Draw a map of the way (to your home). Be sure to show north, south, east, and west. Could someone unfamiliar with your neighborhood use your map to find your house? How do compass directions help humans find their way?
Why do you think ants don't venture out at night to search for food?

Some ants milk an insect called an aphid, much like a farmer milks a cow. The ants stroke the bug's sides gently and wait for the sweet honeydew to appear.
Draw a cartoon of an ant milking an aphid.

The nurse ants care for the ant eggs. They watch the eggs from the egg stage, through the larve stage, until the young ants emerge. Some larvae can signal the nurse ants when they need them. When new ants leave the nest to search for food they sometimes get lost. Older workers will find these lost ants and carry them back to the nest.
Make a list of babies that are dependent on their mothers at birth. Make another list of babies that do not need their mothers when they are born.

Some ants raise mushrooms inside their nests. The ants cut and carry leaves to the nest to provide fertile soil for their mushrooms. Have you ever tasted a raw mushroom?

                            Mushroom Dip
1 package cream cheese                  1 Tablespoon minced green onion
1/2 cup sour cream                           1/4 pound finely chopped mushrooms
1 teaspoon salt

Mix together and chill. Serve with corn chips or crackers.

Some ants make slaves of other ants. They attack and steal young ants from other hives, take them back to their own hives, and make them do all their work.
Write a story that tells how you would feel if you were kidnapped and made to be a slave. Tell about how you might escape your captors.

Ants have suits of "armor" on the outside of their bodies, rather than skeletons.
Draw a picture of what you might look like if your skeleton was on the outside of your skin. Or, make a list of other animals that wear their skeletons on the outside.

Soldier ants are stationed at the entrance to the nest. They guard the nest and keep enemies away. These ants are larger than the workers. Cover a bulletin board with brown butcher paper. Draw an ant colony. You may want to include:
  • interlocking tunnels
  • soldier ants at the entrance
  • nurse ants attending the eggs
  • ants working in their mushroom garden
  • ants milking aphids
  • harvest ants making bread
  • slave ants
  • the queen ant


Ant Crafts

(On one page is a drawn big ant to put a paper face, hands, and shoes on.)

The Easter ant can arrive the day before vacation and leave a treat for all your (children). Treats are made from (a) small ant pattern. A black jelly bean is attached by a thumbtack to the body of the ant. Use tape to fasten them to (children's') clothes. Have fun with your ant treats. Try balancing them on your head or shoulder as you play dead ant. If they fall off, you are out. Let this ant become your pet ant. You then assume total responsibility for your ant. It must be with you at all times. If you leave your ant to wander, it becomes public property. Any other (person) gets to claim it and add it to their pet collection. Finders keepers, loosers weepers.

Halloween is a great time for ant masks. Be a hungry ant and make a fork and spoon to carry in each hand. Several (people) together may enjoy doing an ant play with their ant masks.

Have you been a good ant or a naughty ant? Because Anta Claus is coming to town. Make a Christmas list of an ant. Make Mr. and Mrs. Anta Claus.

Many more ideas will flow as you enter antland. It can so easily be applied to many different subject areas. Save all these ideas and new ones for another time!


                               Finding the Antswers to Questiants

All species of ants belong to the formicidae family. Using the basic ant pattern, invite each child to make his or her own ant and label or identify all its parts.

Questiant:Where do ants live?
Antswer: In colonies, the thirteen original perhaps.
Ants are social insects because they live together in "colonies." Using the thirteen original colonies, start a nation of ants. Draw the shape of the colony and the citizens of Massachusants, Rhode Islants, Pennsylvaniants, and so on. Draw a crown on the antennae of the governor of each state.

Questiant: What should do you do with an ant? Squish it?
Antswer: No, collect ants and study their personality. If you should find they need some, give them some of yours.
To collect ants, use a piece of white paper, plastic bottles with lids, and a piece of cardboard. Search outdoors under rocks for ant colonies. You will see many of the little harmless black and gray ants running around under rocks. Lay a bottle on its side and use the cardboard to guide the ants in. Scoop up some soil and spread it out on white paper. If you see an ant larger than the other ants, it is probably the queen. Take some extra soil with you in another bottle. You will need it for the ants' new home.
To build an ant nest, you will need a wide-mouthed glass jar; an empty tall, thin can; a sponge; black paper; and rubber bands. Place the can inside the jar. Pour the ants" soil between the two. Wet the sponge and place it across the top of the can. Place the ants on the soil and secure the lid. Wrap the jar with black paper and secure with rubber bands.

Questiant: Why the black paper?
Antswer: Ants like the dark and will build their tunnels close to the glass if it is dark there.
Place your jar in a shallow pan of water on a piece of wood. Place it in a warm place away from direct sunlight. Feed the ants with bread crumbs, bits of meat, drops of honey, sugar, and dead insects. After a few days, remove the black paper and find the antswers to any questiants you might have.
  1. What do the ants do?
  2. How do they communicate with each other?
  3. Do they know it is feeding time? Why?
  4. Why do they build tunnels?
(the bottom of this page shows to cartoon ants talking to each other)

During your observations be sure to sing the rhyming songs: "The Ants Go Marching One by One, Hurrah, Hurrah!"

"Our Antcestor"
Trace the basic ant pattern on black paper and cut it out. You may want to enlarge the pattern. Using scraps of paper, yarn, tissue paper, and whatever materials are available, dress your ant appropriately for your particular antcestor. If you are teaching social studies, make Abraham Lincant, George Washingtant, Benjamin Franklant, Ant Betsy Ross, Florence Nightantgale, and so on.

"Our Antimals"
Draw the face of an animal or cut out a picture from a magazine. Trace and cut out the basic ant pattern. Paste the animal face to the ant body. You may discover stegosaurant or Leo the liant. Put all your animals behind bars and display on a (wall) zoo.

"Dead Ant"
Choose two (children) to be the killer ants. They are "it." The chosen killer ants try to tag the other (children). The only way the (children) can be safe from them is to "freeze" with their antennae (arms) up in the air and say "dead ant." When a killer ant tags someone who wasn't fast enough to be a dead ant, that ant is captured and taken off to the ant prison (which is a certain spot in the room).


Activities
  • Declare National Ant Day: Take your ant to lunch and buy her a "MacAnt Sandwich."
  • Michael Jacksant, famous recording ant, is in dire need of material for his songs. Help him write a song and give it a hit title. This new hit could become your "family anthem."
  • Write tongue twisters incorporating the word "ant" in regular words: Indianta Jones is awfully antsome.
  • Write a recipe for "ant soup."
  • Write a conversation between two ants.
  • Pretend you are an ant that somehow got caught in a marching parade. How will you ever get out alive?
  • Make a board game to play with an ant theme.



(This next page has five jars that lists words of parts of the sentences: Nouns, Verbs, Pronouns, Adjectives, Adverbs

Directions:
Write the bold word in the correct jar.

One pretty day in the month of May
My friends and I went out to play.
We walked so slowly to the park;
There children laugh and puppies bark.
Hot dogs were toasting on the grill,
We smelled them as we climbed the hill.
The table setting by the stream
Was sure to be any picnicker's dream.
We found some cakes, salads, chips, pies,
They looked so glorious to our hungry eyes.
I discovered the chef asleep on a stool,
The grown-ups and kids took a swim in the pool.
We climbed on the table and just took a bite,
But one led to another, then oh! What a sight!
We ate such a feast, crumbs fell to the ground.
Not one of us noticed the approaching sound
Of the chef coming swiftly, his feet doing a dance,
The look on his face when he saw us--Black Ants!
We looked like an army, so quickly retreating,
Our bellies were full after all of that eating.
We marched to our colony, burrowed inside,
Until the next picnic--we'll stay here and hide.

(There are a list for eight Nouns; eight Verbs; six Pronouns; eight Adjectives; and seven Adverbs--maybe you can make more.

                                           "Ant"onyms

Read each sentence below. In the blank write the opposite of the word you see in parentheses.

  1. The bus left (early)___________________________for the school picnic.
  2. It was the (last)_______________________time we had gone to Holly Park.
  3. The children were (sad)___________________about going.
  4. (Few)_________________________boys and girls were singing songs.
  5. This was going to be a (short)_________________bus ride.
  6. Most of the seats on the bus were (empty)________________________.
  7. (None)______________of the children were glad it was Saturday.
  8. When the bus stopped, it was time to get (on)_____________________.
  9. The children (walked)______________to the picnic tables to eat.
  10. They ate their lunches (slowly)____________________.
  11. Ants crawled on the table where the (grown-ups)_________________ate.
  12. (Girls)_____________began to throw Frisbees.
  13. One girl tried to (throw)______________________it.
  14. (Before)____________________ they ate, it was time for a visit to the zoo.
  15. Most of the animals were (inside)_____________________________.
  16. The monkeys were the (quietest)________________________of all the animals.
  17. Later the kids (sold)________________________souvenirs.
  18. Several boys got on the (right)__________________bus.
  19. It was (morning)_____________________ when the children go back to school.
  20. The sky was beginning to get (light)___________________.

Circle the word in each row that is the opposite of the first word.

  1. messy                          sloppy, neat, dirty
  2. soft                               mushy, weak, hard
  3. pretty                            ugly, beautiful, lovely
  4. old                                worn, used, new
  5. smooth                          level, rough, flat
 

Insects lesson

Posted on September 2, 2014 at 1:14 AM Comments comments (40)
Grandma is giving you a lesson for Insects from Book (57). There is something I want parents to understand. While you are starting your children with a new year of lessons, the public schools are having to test their children to see what level of learning they are at during this time. That gives you one advantage.

The Unit on Insects is as follows:

                                    "Bub Bonanza by Mary Ellen Switzer

Introduction
Turn your (children) into excited young entomologists with this motivating array of insect activities. (Grandma has one book that invites children to belong to what they call a bug club, there is also in another what they call a plant club. At the end of this insect unit in book (57) are awards for insect collecting and doing. Take advantage of awards any time you can because kids really love them as much as they love little stickers.) They will be "buzzing" with excitement as they plan an insect trivia game, use "Bug-a-Rama Drama" script starters to create plays, and work on the Bug Bonanza activity page. (Another important activity for children to do is collect all kinds of bugs, spiders, butterflies, flies, ants, etc.; This time of year they are abundant because they have had all summer to develop. It is a great time to do some fishing and hunt for big worms after a rain.Save insects in plastic cover with netted covers or jars for a short time and then released.)

The Bug Jar Trivia Game
Send your (children) on an insect "trivia hunt" to help make a (family) trivia game. They may use encyclopedias and other reference books to research their information.
Divide your class into small teams and ask each group to write questions (with answers) on 3" x 5" cards on their assigned subject. Suggested categories include ants, butterflies, bees, crickets, grasshoppers, flies, and beetles. Have a brainstorming session with your (family and friends) to add more to the list.
Place the completed trivia question cards in a large glass jar labeled "The Bug Jar," and play a round or two during those extra minutes of the day.
To further extend this activity, trivia teams can write mini reports on their assigned insects to be presented to the (family and friends). Suggestions include making poster reports (with pictures and facts), creating a television game show or news program that features insects facts, and an imaginary interview with an entomologist.

Fabulous Fables
It's fable time! Read students some of Aesop's delightful fables that feature insect characters. Suggestions are "The Grasshopper and the Ant," "The Ant and the Dove," and "The Fox and the Cicada." Next have the children write and illustrate their own fables using insects as main characters.
Celebrate at the end of this project by having an "Aesop's Fable Party." Have your children read their fables to the class. Serve animal cookies, since so many of Aesop's characters were animals!

Mother Goose Fun
Read the familiar "Little Miss Muffet" Mother Goose rhyme to your (children). Ask the (children) to create a comic strip about the rhyme from the spider's point of view. (This is a good introductory unit to Mother Goose but Grandma usually likes to use it in the month of May because of everything starting with the letter M for May. However, Grandma likes to use the story of the Moose eating a cookie and the Mouse eating something else Grandma can't remember because of the mice at Christmas time, cookies for Halloween, forest stories in the fall because of the harvests and changing of the trees. They all seem to fit that way for Grandma thought of learning. You have to plan things comfortably for yourselves. If you did cover the Mother Goose rhymes in the spring or for last year, this definitely fills the position as a review and with the introduction of comics as well as the restart of the newspaper.)

Invention Fun
Be an inventor! Create a new state-of-the-art and farm. Label the parts of your new ant farm. Draw your design on another sheet of paper. Tell the world about your invention. Write an advertisement about the ant farm. (Use another insect if you wish.)

Let's Write a Story
Write a story about a bug. Here are some story starter ideas:
Hello, my name is Gary Grasshopper. My life as a grasshopper is very exciting! Let me tell you about one of my days...
One warm summer day, a curious ant named Andy decided to visit a picnic. It turned into an adventure that he would never forget! here's what happened...

Bug-a-Rama Drama
Delight your (children) with these motivating script-writing activities. ...give each ...a script starter. Ask each...to create a script, practice it, and then share their skits with (you and/or others).

Amazing Insects
Setting: television newsroom
Characters: Announcer and any number of reporters
Script-Starter: Announcer: "Welcome to our program Amazing Insects. Our reporters are here today with some interesting information on insects. Here's our first reporter with some great information." (Reporters 1, 2, 3, etc., give their reports on various insects.) (Puppets can be use or dolls in place of other reporters only your child or children are do the talking. )

The Unhappy Ladybug
Setting: grassy meadow
Characters: Laura Ladybug, Buzzy Bee, Cassie Cricket, Andy Ant, Bernie Butterfly, and any number of insect characters
Plot: Laura Ladybug sits sadly under a mushroom. It's her birthday today, and all her friends have forgotten. Write a script telling how her friends come to the rescue to make it a happy birthday she'll never forget.

The Case of the Missing Caterpillar
Setting: office of Sam E. Spider, Detective
Characters: Detective Sam E Spider, his helper Florence Fly, C. H. Caterpillar, Charlie Butterfly, and any number of insect suspects
Plot: Detective Sam E. Spider needs your help. C.H. Caterpillar has been missing for two days, and everyone is worried. Write a script telling what happened to C.H.

Fred E. Firefly Saves the Day
Setting: grassy field
Characters: Fred E. Firefly, Betty Butterfly, and any number of insect characters
Plot:One rainy day a Monarch butterfly named Betty got separated from her family. They searched all day with the help of their insect friends but couldn't find Betty anywhere. It was getting dark--what could they do now? Write a script about how Fred E. Firefly comes to their aid.

Insect Book Nook
Dorros, Arthur, Ant Cities, New York: Harper & Row, 1987
Johnson, Sylvia Water Insects. Minneapolis, Lerner Publications Co., 1989
Mound, Laurence. Insect Eyewitness Books, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1990
Parker, Nancy Winslow, and Wright, Joan Richards. Bugs. New York: Greenwillow Books, 1987.
Parker, Steve. Insects Eyewitness Explorers. New York: Dorling Kindersley, Inc., 1992.
Porter, Keith. Discovering Crickets and Grasshoppers. New York: The Bookwright Press, 1986.
---. Discovering Butterflies and Moths. New York: Gloucester Press, 1987.
Petty, Kate. Bees and Wasps. New York: Gloucester Press, 1987.
Pringle, Laurence. The Golden Book of Insects and Spiders. Racine, Wisconsin: Western Publishing Co., 1990.
Still, John. Amazing Beetles Eyewitness Juniors. New York: Alfred A. Knopt, 1991.
Watts, Barrie. Keeping Minibeasts: Ladybugs. New York: Franklin Watts, 1990.





                                                           Bug Bonanza Trivia

Attention all Junior entomologists! Grab your pencils and test your knowledge of the insect world.

_________________________1.   Name the three parts of an insect.

_________________________2.   How many legs does an insect have?

_________________________3.   The legs and wings are attached to what part of the insect?

_________________________4.   Beware! This insect "attacks"  wood.

_________________________5.   True or false. Insects live long lives.

_________________________6.   What do ladybugs like to eat?

_________________________7.    Name the insect that looks like a twig.

_________________________8.    How many legs does a spider have?

_________________________9.    Are insects cold-blooded animals?

________________________10.   What is the hard outer covering of an insect called?

________________________11.   What is the larva of a butterfly called?

________________________12.   Watch out! These bugs give off a bad odor when disturbed.

________________________13.   What insects are sometimes called "armored tanks" of the bug
                                                  world?
________________________14.   Ants live in groups called ____________________________.

________________________15.   True or False. There are over a million species of insects.

________________________16.   Name the heaviest insect.

________________________17.   Are insects vertebrates or invertebrates?

________________________18.   Bees make honey from _____________________________.

________________________19.   These beetles can shoot a hot liquid from their abdomens.

________________________20. What is the longest insect?







                                           Bug Bonanza Activity Sheet

Attention kids! Get your paper, pencils, and crayons ready and let's begin! We hope you enjoy the activities below__ all about insects.

  1. What is your favorite insect? Tell why.
  2. Draw and label the parts of an insect. Remember the three body parts--head, thorax, and abdomen. Then add six legs, antennae, and wings.
  3. Make a list of all the ways insects can help us.
  4. Extra! Extra! Read all about it! Your trip to the tropical rain forest was a big success! You have discovered a new insect. Write a newspaper article to tell the world about your discovery. Remember to include the five Ws: Who? What? Where? When? and Why? Think of a catchy headline for your story.
  5. Design a bookmark for your favorite insect book character.
  6. Make a list of all the insects you can think of. Make a game, such as a word scramble list or word search. You may also use words pertaining to insects, such as body parts.
  7. Be a reporter! Create a one-page newspaper called "The Grasshopper Gazette." Write news articles and stories about grasshoppers. Include pictures with your articles or stories. Use an encyclopedia or reference book to find out more about grasshoppers.
  8. Write a riddle about any insect. You should have at least three clues written in complete sentences. Try to stump a friend!
  9. How many words can you make using the letters in "praying mantis"?
  10. Be a butterfly detective. Look up information about butterflies in a reference book. Cut out a big shape and include at least one picture in your report.

Circle (and draw) an insect on this page for every activity you complete."




                                     "Butterflies by Florence Rives

Objective: This unit proposes to enlighten us about the beauty and worth of the butterfly by developing an increased appreciation and awareness of the part that butterflies play in the world.

  1. Why are butterflies called butterflies? What are some legends and theories about this?
  2. Describe a butterfly's wings.
  3. Why do you suppose many butterflies are spoken of as "winged flowers?"
  4. Explain what caterpillars are.
  5. How can you tell butterflies from moths?
  6. What are the body parts of a butterfly or any other true insect called?
  7. Write a short paragraph explaining how the butterfly uses its antennae.
  8. 8. What are butterfly wings made of?
  9. What are the purposes of the scents which the butterfly gives off?
  10. List the four stages of life through which the butterfly and the moth go. Draw a sketch of each stage.
  11. Explain what a compound eye is.
  12. List some of the enemies of butterflies. How are butterflies and caterpillars equipped to escape their enemies?
  13. What is molting? How many times does a caterpillar molt before it becomes an adult butterfly?
  14. How long do some butterflies live?
  15. About how many kinds or groups of butterflies are known by scientists?
  16. Describe the butterfly's proboscis. How does the butterfly use it? Write two sentences about it.
  17. Find out about camouflage, or protective coloration, of the butterfly and moth.
  18. What can you find out about the "eyespots" on a butterfly's wings? Why are they there? How do the eyespots help the butterfly?
  19. What do butterflies feed upon? What do caterpillars feed upon? Why do you suppose certain butterflies and caterpillars prefer to eat certain foods?
  20. How do butterflies help people?
  21. Define metamorphosis.
  22. Find out about the migration of certain butterflies. Why do they do this?
  23. How is a "brush-footed" butterfly different from other butterflies?
  24. What United States butterfly is the largest?
  25. If you wanted to have a butterfly haven in your yard, what are some of the plants you would grow?
  26. Research in depth one or two of the following. Write a paper to share with your classmates.
          a.   Tiger Swallowtail                                     b.   Monarch
          c.   Common Sulphur                                    d.   Painted Lady
          e.   Giant Swallowtail                                    f.    Viceroy
          g.   Red Admiral                                           h.   other
    27.  Why do you think some butterflies may be on the endangered list? Discuss.


Things to Do and Think About
  1. Use a large magnifying glass to examine caterpillars when you find them. Do the same for any chrysalis you find.
  2. Go to a museum where collections of butterflies are kept to see different kinds, body and wing markings, etc.
  3. Enjoy looking at many pictures of butterflies in books, magazines, filmstrips, or wherever you find them. By studying their pictures you will be more apt to identify them when you see the real ones. You might also carefully observe the caterpillar pictures in order to match or associate them with the butterflies they will become.
  4. Sketch a butterfly to show its body parts. Label each part.
  5. Use butterflies as motifs to design wallpaper, a bedspread, a bathroom curtain, etc. Select the colors to blend with those of the butterflies.
  6. Selma, Alabama, has been declared the butterfly capital of the state. This was achieved by the efforts of a group of garden clubs, beautification and tourism councils, and Girl and Boy Scouts. It was a conservation effort. In 1985 the Alabama Senate designated April 16 as the annual "Save the Butterfly Day" in Alabama. What do you suppose you might do to have your state and/or city declared a butterfly haven?
  7. Make a set of flashcards using pictures of butterflies. Write the names of butterflies on the back of each card. Study the pictures, and then have a flashcard contest with a (friend or parent).
  8. Sketch and color a desk-size butterfly on cardboard. Cut it into ten or twelve pieces to make a puzzle. See if your (friends or family) can put the puzzle together.
  9. Make a short crossword puzzle with words you have learned during your study of butterflies.
  10. As a (family), choose a favorite butterfly and form a (group) to make a butterfly flag for your (home) or (somewhere).
  11. Select a late spring or early summer month and make a butterfly calendar for that month. Decorate the date squares with colorful butterflies. Make the calendar big enough to be seen easily from the back of the room.
  12. Compile all of your accumulated pictures, clippings, sketches, notes, writings,etc. into a (family) booklet. Add drawings, stories, lists, puzzles, and poems."

References
Bring, Ruth Butterflies Are Beautiful. Minneapolis: Lerner, 1984.
Brouillette, Jeanne S. Butterflies. Chicago: Follett, 1961.
Fischer, Heiderose and Andreas Nagel. Life of the Butterfly, Minneapolis: Carolrhoda Books, Inc., 1987.
Mitchell, Robert T. and Herbert Zim. A Golden Guide to Butterflies and Moths. New York: Golden Press, 1964.
National Wildlife Federation. National Wildlife. Vienna, VA. Aug./Sept. 1988: pp. 4-11.
Porter, Keith. Discovering Butterflies and Moths. New York: The Bookwrite Press, 1986.
Sammis, Kathy. Butterflies. New York: MacMillan Co., 1965.

More of June Calendar for Summer Lessons

Posted on August 31, 2014 at 10:56 AM Comments comments (48)
I am so pleased with all the answers I am receiving about the blogs and some of the material. It is very flustering when one is trying to get material to people and the machines just don't get the message that it is important. I do appreciate people being so patient with me.
There are a few more events to me added to June 12 history line from Book (1) as follows:

June 12, 1956 The Official Flag of the U.S. Army was adopted.

June 12,  1974 Little League was opened to girls.

June 12, 1979 Bryan Allen became the First Person to Fly a
Human Powered Aircraft across the English Channel.
He supplied the power of pedaling.


June 13 has two birthdays as follows:

June 13, 1786 Winfield Scott, American army general, was born.

June 13, 1865 William Butler Yeats, Irish poet, was born.

The events are as follows:

June 13, 1789 Mrs. Alexander Hamilton served ice cream for
dessert at a Dinner Party for George Washington.

June 13, 1893 Thomas Stewart patented the MOP.

June 13, 1927 New York City honored Charles Lindbergh
with a ticker-tape parade.

June 13, 1956 British Troops Withdrew from the Suez Canal,
turning over the waterway's operation to Egypt.

Book (1) has got this to say: "Canal mapping-Have your (children) locate the Suez Canal on a world map and name the two major bodies of water it connects. Then ask them to name the major canal in the Americas and locate it on the world map. Which  two bodies of water does it link? Why are canals important?

June 13, 1966 The Supreme Court handed down the Miranda Ruling,
which required that crime suspects in police custody be informed of their rights.

Book (1) says in "Supreme powers-Tell your (children) that President Lyndon Johnson nominated Thurgood Marshall for the U.S. Supreme Court. Then have them use an almanac to find out the nine current Supreme Court Justices and the presidents who nominated each of them. Some people believe a president's greatest power is the ability to nominate Supreme Court justices. Ask your students why this might be true."

June 13, 1983 Pioneer 10 became the First Man-Made
Object to Leave the Solar System.

Book (1) says in "Spectacular space missions-When Pioneer 10 left the solar system in 1983, it was a landmark event in aerospace history. Ask you (children) to imagine the kinds of space missions that might occur over the next 50 years. Have them make a list of their ideas. Then have them draw a futuristic space vehicle and describe its first-of-a-kind mission."


June 14 is full of history starting with the birthdays as follows:

June 14, 1811 Harriet Beecher Stowe, American author who wrote
Uncle Tom's Cabin, was born.

June 14, 1945 Bruce Degan, children's illustrator, was born.

June 14, 1948 Laurence Yep, children's author, was born.

June 14, 1958 Eric Heiden, American speed skater who won
five gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympics
at Lake Placid, N.Y., was born.

June 14, 1969 Steffi Graf, German Tennis star, was born.

Then there is also all the events for that day as follows:

June 14, 1777 The Continental Congress adopted the
Stars and Stripes as The Official American Flag.

Book (1) gives an activity for the children for this event under "National symbol-On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress adopted this brief resolution: "That the Flag of the United States be 13 stripes alternate red and white, and that the Union be 13 stars white in a blue field representing a new constellation." But Congress didn't make a sketch of the new flag, so people weren't sure how big the field of blue should be, how to arrange the stars, how many points the stars should have, or how wide the stripes should be. Ask your (children) to design their own flags based on the original resolution. Your (family) will be surprised by all the possible variations. Today, the size, color, and placement of each star and stripe is stipulated by executive order."

June 14, 1834 The First Practical Diving Suit was patented.

June 14, 1834 Sandpaper was patented.

June 14, 1846 Settlers in Sonoma, Calif., proclaimed California a republic.

June 14, 1900 The Hawaiian Islands became U.S. territory.

June 14, 1919 The First Nonstop Transatlantic Flight was
completed after 16 hours.

Book (1) gives the following activity with the title "Flying heroes-Tell your (children) that pilot John Alcock and navigator Arthur Brown flew nonstop from Newfoundland to Clifden, Ireland, despite numerous in-flight problems. For instance, an overheated exhaust pipe turned to liquid and blew away. A snowstorm caused ice to form on the airplane's instruments, and Brown had to climb out onto the wings to chip it away. And a dense fog so disoriented the men that they nearly crashed into the Atlantic Ocean. (The fog lifted suddenly, allowing Alcock to pull up after seeing he was just 100 feet above the ocean.) Challenge your (children) to uncover more details about this historic flight. Then encourage them to create front-page stories or television news reports about these men. (The children)  might also like to role-play Alcock and Brown and answer (others') questions about their adventure."

June 14, 1922 Warren G. Harding became the First U.S. President
to Make a Presidential Radio Broadcast.

June 14, 1938 The Caldecott Medal, for the Most distinguished
American picture book for children, was awarded for the first time.

June 14, 1951 Univac I, The First Commercially Built Computer,
went into operation at the Census Bureau in Philadelphia.

June 14, 1991 The National Video Game and Coin-op
Museum opened in St. Louis, Mo.

June 14 is also Flag Day and Hug Pledge Day


June 15 is just as eventful but has only the following two birthdays:

June 15, 1954 Jim Belushi, American actor, was born.

June 15, 1958 Wade Boggs, baseball star, was born.

Following are the events for June 15:

June 15, 1752 Ben Franklin Flew a Kite during a lightning storm
and proved that lightning is an electrical charge.

Book (1) makes an activity of this most famous event in "High-flying adventures-To mark the day that Ben Franklin used a kite to prove that lightning is an electrical charge, bring in a kite and suspend it from the ...ceiling. Then share Tom Moran's Kite Flying Is for Me with your (children). Next, ask the kids to write and illustrate poems about Franklin's electrifying experiment."

June 15, 1775 George Washington was appointed
Commander in Chief of the Continental Army.

June 15, 1836 Arkansas became the 25th state.

June 15, 1844 Charles Goodyear patented a process for vulcanizing rubber.

June 15, 1854 The First Ice Cream Factory opened.

June 15, 1864 Arlington National Cemetery was established.

June 15, 1877 Henry O. Flipper became the First Black Graduate of West Point.

June 15, 1889 Congress created the National Zoological Park.

Grandma thought there might me a more appropriate spot for the Following Units in Book (57), but as she looks at things this has to be the best spot to start lessons on these following topics:

The first mention here is of National Parks and considering summer is a great time to visit or go to National Parks. A couple of these Grandma will write about and give activities for. She will finish them in November. Consider there is mention of Mountains in these parks Grandma wants you to know also that she has plans to cover that in November if she hasn't already.
The next mention in this event is that of the Zoos. Book (57) has a Unit also to tie with the study of the animals which I feel is best to start here and move these on into September then begin them again in May.
Then it opens the door for the study of insects throughout the summer and into September then picks up again in the spring when butterflies, Ants, and Bees begin to be seen again. Book (57) not only has a section on Butterflies, but a big one on Ants. Grandma feels there should be as much study on bees as well because as one book Grandma has points out there is becoming a problem of many bees dying unexpectedly lately as well as the production of butterflies. Many people believe it is due to the production of Monsanto and other types of pesticides we are developing in our plants for protection. They are contaminating our own water and the cattle's. How can we expect the birds and bees to survive it, as well as the butterflies. Do some research on that in the next few weeks and see what you discover.

"The National Parks" by Pat O'Brien from Book (57) and Grandma will finish it up in November starts out with the following information:

"Four parks, a monument, and a seashore have been selected for study here. They represent areas in the United States national park system that have been set aside for the protection off natural wonders and the enjoyment of the people. Hopefully the information, questions, and wonders that are a part of the nation's heritage.

Grand Canyon National Park
For many years nature has been at work carving a masterpiece. Mountains formed and eroded. Seas covered the area and dried up, leaving layers of sediment. Running water, heat, frost, wind, gravity, uplifting, and faulting have combined to determine the formations of the Grand Canyon. (It is famously visited by many people.)

Vocabulary
Define the following terms: bluff, batte, plateau, mountain, canyon, and gorge.

History
For centuries, Native Americans had made the canyon their home. Most early explorers were looking for land to settle and riches to mine. From their point of view the canyon was awe=inspiring, but not practical.
The first white men to view the Grand Canyon in 1540 were conquistadors in search of gold. John Wesley Powell explored the canyon by boat in 1869. He and his party risked their lives running the white water rapids. As dangerous as it was, he believed it was worth a  great deal to see it. Theodore Roosevelt became aware of the need to preserve the beauty for generations to come. As President in 1908, he declared the Grand Canyon a national monument. It was to become a national park in 1919.
Imagine what these explorers might have said when they first saw the canyon. Make a list of quotes.

Special Study: Rocks (This is where Grandma's families greatest interests are.)
The Grand Canyon is composed of many elaborate rock formations. There are three main classes of rock, igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic. They are classified by how they are formed.
  1. Collect and identify rocks. Where in nature would you find each type? 
  2. Read to find out how each type is formed, Compile the information into a booklet entitled All About Rocks.
  3. Make rock rubbings. Use them to create a collage.
  4. Compile a glossary to describe the rocks .... .

What to See
Because of the varied elevations throughout the park, There are different climates. Deep in the canyon it is hot and dry. There, desert plants and animals may be seen.
The North Rim features a cool mountain climate. The North Rim is the only place in the world where the Kaibab squirrel may be found.
High desert and mountain climates combine along the lower South Rim. Chipmunks and deer live among the piñon and juniper forests there.

What to Do
There are hiking trails for viewing the various formations and wildlife in the park. In the summer, hiking into canyon is difficult because of the hot, dry climate. Mules also take riders into the canyon. Another view is from the river looking up.
Would you want to see the Grand Canyon by walking along the rim, hiking or riding a mule down into the canyon, flying overhead, or rafting on the Colorado? Survey members of your class to find out which they would prefer. Graph the results.


Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park there are two active volcanoes: Mauna Loa and Kilauea. These volcanoes are seldom explosive. The magma is fluid and low in gas, producing shield volcanoes, gently sloping volcanic mountains resembling a warrior's shield.
  1. Draw a map of the island of Hawaii. Show the two volcanoes.
     2.  Plan a tour of the area. What other places of interest could you visit?

Birth of an Island
A hot spot, an immense reservoir of molten rock below the surface of the Pacific. Plate, is responsible for building the Hawaiian Islands. Magma is forced up between the cracks of the plate. After contless eruptions of lava, a new volcano grows for thousands of years until it rises above the surface of the sea to form an Island.
  1. If the island of Hawaii "grew" out of the ocean, where did the plants and animals come from?
  2. Use a series of illustrations to show how an island is formed. Write a label for each picture.

Special Study: Volcanoes
The three main types of volcanoes are shield, cinder cone, and composite. Compare the three kinds of discover how they are alike and different.

Something to Do
  1. Organize the information you have collected into a book titled, All About Volcanoes.(Tie this to the unit learned about Disasters I will be finishing this year from Book (57) also.)
  2. Make a diagram showing the inside of a volcano. Include the conduit, vent, crater, magma, steam, and lava flow.

In the Beginning
The early Hawaiians made up stories to explain volcanic eruptions. They believed that Pele, the goddess of fire, showed her displeasure with them by causing eruptions that sent flaming lava down to destroy their homes. Create your own myth to explain how volcanoes are formed. Write and illustrate the story.
Today scientists better understand how volcanoes erupt. They use delicate instruments to predict volcanic activity. They usually know where the eruption will occur but not how powerful it will be."
(That is all Grandma will give about National  Parks for now. Next will be about Zoos and then Grandma will move into Units on Insects.)


Fishes con't.

Posted on August 15, 2014 at 1:25 PM Comments comments (31)
Grandma will finish the unit on fish in Book (57) here. She will next give you the Unit on Oceans which she have given first. She has a unit on bugs; one on ants; and one on butterflies all in Book (57). Then Book (57) has a unit on clowns and space for June and July so watch for them. Following is the rest of the fish:

"A Tale of Travel

Many aspects of the incredible migration and breeding habits of the European eel remain a mystery to science. Adult European eels live in fresh water for a time, Then they move toward the sea and change into saltwater fishes. Their color changes to silver and their eyes get larger. Then they migrate more than 3000 miles across the atlantic to their spawning grounds in the Sargasso Sea. When the larva hatch, they are aided by ocean currents in their three-year jouney across the Atlantic to the coast of Europe. When they arrive, they change into baby eels and make their way upstream into European rivers, where they live as freshwater adult eels.
Write a fictional account of the eels' travels and adventures. What attractions might they stop to see? Salt Disney World? Whale National Park complete with spouting "geysers?" Where do the eels spend the night? Motel 6? Where do they stop to eat? At an oyster bar? Write about the itinerary for the whole migration.

Clowning Around
Grandma will finish the unit on fish in Book (57) here. She will next give you the Unit on Oceans which she have given first. She has a unit on bugs; one on ants; and one on butterflies all in Book (57). Then Book (57) has a unit on clowns and space for June and July so watch for them. Following is the rest of the fish:

"A Tale of Travel

Many aspects of the incredible migration and breeding habits of the European eel remain a mystery to science. Adult European eels live in fresh water for a time, Then they move toward the sea and change into saltwater fishes. Their color changes to silver and their eyes get larger. Then they migrate more than 3000 miles across the Atlantic to their spawning grounds in the Sargasso Sea. When the larva hatch, they are aided by ocean currents in their three-year jouney across the Atlantic to the coast of Europe. When they arrive, they change into baby eels and make their way upstream into European rivers, where they live as freshwater adult eels.
Write a fictional account of the eels' travels and adventures. What attractions might they stop to see? Salt Disney World? Whale National Park complete with spouting "geysers?" Where do the eels spend the night? Motel 6? Where do they stop to eat? At an oyster bar? Write about the itinerary for the whole migration.

Clowning Around

Sea anemones have sting cells along ther tentacles that are used to kill the small creatures they eat. A small, brightly-colored fish called the clown fish, however, is able to swim freely near the sea anemone. The mucous coat cavering the clown fish is different from that of other fishes and does not trigger the sea anemone's sting cells. Thus, the clown fish attracts fish for the sea anemone to consume but is protected from predators that cannot swim safely near the sea anemone.
Write about an underwater circus and/or carnival complete with clown fish, lionfish tamer, prancing sea horses, dogfish tricks, a swardfish swallower, and elephant seals.

School Days
Grunion are small fish with unusual spawning habits. Schools of grunion strand themselves on the beach after high tide on nights following a full or new moon. The female quickly lays about 3000 eggs in the sand, the male fertilizes them, and then the adults are carried back into the ocean with the next wave. The eggs are left behind, hidden in the sand. They hatch two weeks later when they are jostled around and carried out to sea by the waves of the next high tide.
Write about school for the grunions or any other fish that swim in schools. What is a typical...school ...like? What school supplies are needed? What subjects are studied? Do pre-schoolers learn the "elverbet" (an elver is one name for a baby eel)
Sea anemones have sting cells along ther tentacles that are used to kill the small creatures they eat. A small, brightly-colored fish called the clown fish, however, is able to swim freely near the sea anemone. The mucous coat cavering the clown fish is different from that of other fishes and does not trigger the sea anemone's sting cells. Thus, the clown fish attracts fish for the sea anemone to consume but is protected from predators that cannot swim safely near the sea anemone.
Write about an underwater circus and/or carnival complete with clown fish, lionfish tamer, prancing sea horses, dogfish tricks, a swardfish swallower, and elephant seals.

School Days
Grunion are small fish with unusual spawning habits. Schools of grunion strand themselves on the beach after high tide on nights following a full or new moon. The female quickly lays about 3000 eggs in the sand, the male fertilizes them, and then the adults are carried back into the ocean with the next wave. The eggs are left behind, hidden in the sand. They hatch two weeks later when they are jostled around and carried out to sea by the waves of the next high tide.
Write about school for the grunions or any other fish that swim in schoools. What is a typical...school ...like? What school supplies are needed? What subjects are studied? Do pre-schoolers learn the "elverbet" (an elver is one name for a baby eel)? Do older children take Fish Hooks 501? What extracurricular activities are offered? Baseball played with a pearl? Spanfish Club? Write about any school-related topics you can think of, such as report cards, lunch, and recess.

(following is a math page)


                  "Addition" al Fish Fact Fun

Solve each problem. Then fill in the letter of the answer that matches each puzzle space.

   A  37+48 =                        G  78+18 =                   N  71+19 =             T  19+58 =
   B  15+29 =                        H  63+28 =                   O  69+29 =             U  65+29 =
   D  66+16 =                         I   14+67 =                   P  25+48 =             Y  57+19 =
   E  26+69 =                        L   52+18 =                   R  43+19 =
   F  49+26 =                        M  36+27 =                   S  17+57 =

1. This fish can leap out of the water and thenoar above the sea using its large pectoral fins.
    These fins can have a span of more than twenty feet from one tip to the other. A loud,
    thunderous clap can be heard when this creature's 3000-pound body reenters the ocean. The
    leaps are a good way to escape enemies and shake off parasites.

                        ____ ____ ____ ____ ____           ____ ____ ____
                         63     85    90     77    85               62    85     76

2. The eggs, blood, and some of the body organs of this fish contain a poison which is deadly to
    humans, yet the flesh can be eaten and is considered a delicacy in Japan. Those who eat this
    fish are putting their lives in the hands of a fugu cook. During preparation, the specially-trained
    cook must take special precautions against contamining the flesh with the poisonous parts.


              ____ ____ ____ ____ ____         ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
                82    95    85     77     91            73    94     75     75    95     62

3. Because its body structure is so rigid, this fish moves very slowly through the water. It uses its
    prehensile tail to hang onto coral and plants so it doesn't drift far out to sea. The female
    deposits her eggs in the male's pouch. The young remain in the pouch until they are well-
    developed.


                             ____ ____ ____        ____ ____ ____ ____ ____
                               74    95    85            91     98    62    74     95

4. When larger fish are bothered by small animals clinging to their bodies and feeding on their
    blood, this little fish comes to the rescue. It performs a valuable cleaning service by eating the
    parasites which are a nuisance to other fish.


              ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____        ____ ____ ____ ____
                44    85    62     44     95    62            75    81     74    91

5. Because this fish lives at depths where no light penetrates, it carries its own bioluminescent
    light at the end of a "rod" which it uses to attract prey. Since it can be difficult to find a mate in
    dark water when needed, the female, which grows to about  four feet, carries the small 2 to 3-inch
    male along with her. He uses his jaws to fasten onto her body. Then his blood supply becomes
    connected to hers, and he depends on her completely for nourishment and oxygen.


    ___ ____ ____ ____-____ ____ ____          ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ____ ___ ____ ____ ____
      82  95    95     73     74    95    85              85     90    96     70    95     62    75   81       74    91

(more pages to come)              

4th day of Summer Classes

Posted on July 22, 2014 at 12:42 AM Comments comments (18)
Hello Folks:
 
June 6 is our next Calendar Date to present for learning this summer. The birthdays are given as follows:
 
1755 Nathan Hale, American patriot hanged by the British as a spy
 
1911 Verna AArdema, children's author
 
Book (1)says in "Animal ways-Celebrate Verna Aardem's birthday by reading aloud Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears. Then invite the children to create their own stories explaining why other kinds of animals behave the way they do. Have them illustrate their work.
 
This leads us into the study of insects and animals of Book (57) starting with Wildlife Wonders by Teddy Meister. Teddy says, "The study of wildlife is called zoology. It involves knowing about all living creatures from the smallest to the largest on land and in the sea.
Learning by Attributes
In order to organize information about wildlife, scientists categorize them by certain attributes or characteristics:
 
Body Forms
    vertebrate (having a spinal column
     invertebrate (no spinal column)
 
Body Temperatures
     warm-blooded or homoiothermic (temp. remains constant)
     cold-blooded or poikilothermic (temp. adapts to environment)
 
Food Sources
      herbivore (plant eater)
      carnivore (meat eater)
      omnivore (plant and meat eater)
 
Divide your paper into seven columns using the traits of the three major attributes as headings. List animals under each heading that have that characteristic.
How would you test a new species that has just been discovered? Set up a plan you might use. Draw pictures of this new creature. Explain its unusual features and habits. Label the body parts and describe which of the attributes might fit it best.
We have learned many things from the animal world. For example, we have learned about radar from bats. What are some other things we have learned? Find out about sonar and dolphins or how hibernation could affect the possibilities for people to some day take long trips into space. Prepare a talk for your class about your findings.
 
Animal Behavior
Can animals remember things? Can they think? Do they communicate with each other? Did you ever wish that an animal could talk with you? Suppose a favorite pet could actually talk! What kinds of questions would you want to ask?
 
Sorting Some More
Animals can also be categorized by phylum, or type, such as mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and marsupials. Fill in each box by listing an animal and describing why it can be categorized in this way.
 
Mammal                                                         
 
 
 
Reptile
Amphibian 
 
 
                                                      
  Marsupial
 
 
Unusual Animals from A to Z
There are unusual animals to fit every letter of the alphabet, and then some! How many can you find? Use this list as a starter. When it is finished, create an animal alphabet book for young children.
 
A___________________  B______________________C____________________D_________________
 
E___________________  F______________________ G____________________H_________________
 
I____________________  J______________________ K____________________ L_________________
 
M___________________  N______________________ O___________________ P_________________
 
Q___________________  R______________________  S___________________T_________________
 
U___________________  V______________________ W___________________ X_________________
 
Y___________________  Z______________________
 
(In drawing a picture on a page with a plate having the words Food Type:, a page holding the outline Description:; coloring:; body form:; body temperature:; height:; weight:; unusual habits: listed in it, and a heart holding As a pet this animal would need:___________________________________________on one side; the other side a house with Home or Habitat:; a global compass marked with N,E,S,W having Found in: on the side of it; then a rectangular cloud saying This animals is interesting because:____
___________________________________________________________________________________
and Man needs this animal because: ____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________)
 
Fact Finding (is what it is called saying)
Use the outline form to research an animal you want to learn more about. (Look over your A-to-Z list and select one about which you know nothing.)
 
My animal is____________________________________________(on the top)
 
(Book (57) goes on to say,)
Endangered/Extinct
Save our wildlife! Take care of endangered species! This is something we hear all the time. What is the difference between endangered and extinct? Use encyclopedias or the dictionary to find the difference between these two terms. Sometimes an animal on the endangered list can be saved. The Florida alligator is an example of this.
 
Save Our Wildlife
Many animals could out-do humans if we were to have an Olympic contest with them! They are just like Olympic athletes in their special abilities. Can you think of any Olympic competitors to match against a list of animal entries? Use the Guinness Book of Olympic Records to do this.
 
Who Am I?
Create riddles about animals. For example: I have a huge mouth and am known as "the rider horse." I usually weigh a mere 8,000 pounds but bet I can run faster than you! (Answer: hippopotamus.)
 
Animal Pictures
Some animal names make us think of unusual pictures of how they might look. Draw pictures of what the following names make you think of. Use your imagination! Can you find out how each received its peculiar name?
            prairie dog                 bullfrog                  sea lion
            hedgehog                  tiger shark              spider monkey
 
Who's Who
In this activity you will have an opportunity to find out about some of the great people involved with furthering our knowledge about animals. Set up a card file for some mini-research. Find out what each person did by summarizing the information in short paragraphs.
           J.J. Audubon                        Charles Darwin
           Thomas Huxley                     Clinton Merriam
           Rachel Carson                      William Henry Hudson
           Jane Goodall                         Carolus Linnaeus
 
Careers, Careers, Careers
What do the following careers have in common with animals?
               anthropology                             veterinary science
               entomology                               biology
               naturalist                                   vertebrate zoology
               bacteriology
Look through the yellow pages of a telephone directory. Perhaps one of these career areas is listed with a contact person and phone number. Set up a time and date with your ()parents. Call the person listed in the phone book and invite him or her to be a guest speaker for the (family). Be sure to send a thank you note after the visit!
 
It's the Law
The United States Congress passed the endangered Species Act that protects rare plants and animals. This legislation has provided the Secretary of the Interior with the authority to identify threatened or endangered species in new locations. What new laws have been passed in your state? Use the phone book to find the addresses of wildlife and conservation agencies in your state. Write and ask about laws and the animals affected by legislation. Share the information with your (family.)
 
Going, Going, Gone
During the last 2,000 years the world has lost 106 species--two-thirds of these since the mid-19th century,and most since the beginning of the 20th century. How can we stop this alarming rate of extinction? What do children and adults need to do? Does the "Golden Rule" apply to animals as well as people? Talk to parents, neighbors, and (others) about what can be done. Keep a list of suggestions they make. Create a series of new broadcasts you could present to your (family) over a period of time. Ask (others) to help.
 
What Are We Doing?
Many programs are now underway for better wildlife conservation. These include government controls, establishing wildlife sanctuaries, controlling hunting limits and seasons, and restoring and replacing habitats. Do some research about each of these. Find out what is being done in your area. Present a "status report" to your (family). Provide good visual aids to accompany your presentations.
 
IUPN
The International Union for the Protection of Nature began in 1943 with the participation of 33 nations. It was a way to coordinate wildlife protection efforts and share information globally. How did this historic meeting lead to other similar organizations? Find out about IUPN and IUCN. Start a wildlife club at your (church, community, or neighborhood.). Identify club goals and activities. Think of a club name. You might want to design club membership cards and T-shirts.
 
Talk Topics
Gather a group of (people) interested in wildlife conservation and ask each member to thoroughly research a wildlife topic of his or her choice. Practice presenting research findings during free class time ...(Arrange yourselves as "traveling speakers" to other children, adults, groups, and places) Get the word out!
 
Animal Collage
Cut out animal pictures from magazines to create a collage. Begin from the center of the paper. Overlap each of the pictures so that the whole collage is connected to the center. Think of a name for the collage. Display it on (various walls in places.)
 
Nursery Rhymes
Many nursery rhymes you might have learned as a very young child, such as Ding, Dong, Bell; Baa, Baa, Black Sheep; and Mary Had a Little Lamb involved animals. Create a nursery rhyme of your own involving an unusual animal.
 
Animals in Literature
Many of children's favorite stories are about animals. Plan a trip to the library and see how many you can gather for a (family)  reading. Make up a bibliography for your (family). Here is a list to get you started.
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Paddington Bear by Michael Bond
The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Charlotte's Web by E.B. White
Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig
Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Call of the Wild by Jack London
 
                                               Trivia Task---Animal IQ
How many of the trivia tasks can you complete in 15 minutes?.....Have a race to see who has the highest "animal IQ." (Hint: Some of these you might know from earlier activities!)
 
  1. Things we wear that come from animals____________________________________________
  2. Something animals have that humans do not________________________________________
  3. Three things we eat that come from animals_________________________________________
  4. Two kinds of animal habitats______________________________________________________
  5. Animals that provide transportation_________________________________________________
  6. Animals you see every day_______________________________________________________
  7. Animals that are mascots in your area______________________________________________
  8. Animals that symbolize various athletic teams________________________________________
  9. Animal TV "stars"_______________________________________________________________
  10. Animal movie "stars"_____________________________________________________________
  11. Literature based on animals who act and think like humans______________________________
  12. Animals symbolic of certain products we buy_________________________________________
  13. Animals as the main characters in comic strips_______________________________________
  14. Animals symbolic of shoes and clothing we wear______________________________________
  15. The study of animals is called______________________________________________________
  16. Three types of animal food sources__________________________________________________
  17. The classification given to warm-blooded animals_______________________________________
  18. The classification given to cold-blooded animals________________________________________
  19. The meaning of extinction__________________________________________________________
  20. The meaning of marsupial__________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 "Children" and Their Groups
 
Find out the names of animal groups and what their offspring are called. Some have been filled in to help you. When you complete your research, set up a word search puzzle for (the family and others).
 
        Animal                             Offspring                             Group Name
         cow                                  calf                                        herd
         kangaroo                           joey                                      troop
         whale                                calf                                         pod
         horse                                 foal                                     _________
         wolf                                 ___________                            pack
         beaver                                kit                                       _________
          goat                                  kid                                       _________
          goose                              ___________                          gaggle
          sheep                               lamb                                     __________
          rabbit                                bunny                                   ___________
 
Grandma will return to the Calendar History. She will give a little more each day from Book (57). There is lots about animals. She has still more from Book (57) to go with the Calendar History activities but this is it on the animals today. We were still working on June 6th birthdays as follows:
 
1927 Peter Spier, children's author and illustrator
 
1954 Cynthia Rylant, children's author
 
Events for June 6 are as follows:
 
1822 Ten Inches of Snow fell in New England on this day in late spring.
 
Book (1) says in "Spring snowstorms-Ask your (children) to imagine how New Englanders might have felt when they received 10 inches of snow on this date in 1822. Then have the kids create "what's wrong with this picture?" illustrations depicting a snowy summer day. For example, they might draw a beach scene depicting people in swimsuits along with hats, mittens, and boots."
 
1933 The First Drive-in Movie Theater opened in Camden, N.J.
 
1939 The First Little League game was played in Williamsport, Pa.
 
1944 Massive Allied landings on the beaches of Normandy, France,
 marked the D-DAY invasion of Nazi-held Western Europe.
 
1985 Scientists at the University of California confirmed the presence
of a huge black hole at the center of the Milky Way.
 
June 6 is also National Yo-Yo Day
 
Book (1) says in "Yo-yo tricks-In honor of National Yo-Yo Day, invite your students to bring in their yo-yos and demonstrate tricks they can do. For an extra challenge, have the children write and illustrate the different steps involved.
 
It is also National Safe Boating Week (first week in June)
Book (1) says in "Rules for safe sports-Tell your (children) that National Safe Boating Week is a reminder for them to follow safety precautions when they're in boats. Then ask them to follow safety precautions when they're in boats. Then ask the kids to list other summer activities they plan to enjoy--for example, swimming, tennis, baseball, baking, horseback riding. Have the students brainstorm for safety rules that are important for each of their safe-sports rules. Display the posters... .
 
Book (57) uses LifeSavers to help teach safety and colors to younger children. This Unit is called "Be a LifeSaver by Lisa Crooks.
 
Introduction
Kids love to eat LifeSavorsª and they'll love the following activities even more. This unit on LifeSaversª can also be used as a spring-board for reinforcing basic safety rules.
  1. LifeSaversª can provide a hands-on experience for teaching fractions and parts. If you have ten LifeSaversª on the table and five are eaten, how many are left? What fraction is left? Can this be reduced?
  2. Plan a trip to the LifeSaversª factory. Starting from your state, what states would you pass through to get there? What kinds of transportation could you use? What would be the cost of using various types of transportation? How much would the entire trip cost if you were to include transportation, food, and lodging? This activity could be expanded, depending on the level of students.
  3. Candy is made in an assembly line. In (your home or somewhere) set up an assembly line to prepare a no-bake cookie or candy. Each (child) could be responsible for a specific duty. Discuss what would happen if one of the links in the assembly line broke down.
  4. Have the (children) design a LifeSaversª or other type of candy factory. They would need to explain the different machines that would be used in their factory and prepare a map showing where these machines are located in the plant.
  5. Using similar brands of hard candies, invite (family members or others) to join in a taste test to determine whether Candy A or Candy B is preferred." Following are some math problems from Grandma's Book (7) called Candy Shop with Multiplication skills through 5 x 5 with addition. The children must have a paper each. "Several friends bought some candy. Listen carefully to this information so you can tell how much money each person spent. You will want to write down some of the information I am giving you. First you need to know the price of different kinds of candy. Suckers are 5 cents each. Gum is 3 cents a piece. Jelly beans are 2 cents each. (Repeat prices or write them (down)) Now figure out how much each child spent on candy. Number your paper from 1 to 10. On each line write the child's name (don't worry about spelling) and the price he paid.       !.  Tasha bought 3 pieces of gum. By number 1 write her name and the price she paid           (Repeat this part of the directions as necessary throughout the lesson.)                      
            2. Gary bought 3 jelly beans and 1 sucker.
            3. Ann bought 1 sucker, 1 piece of gum and 1 jelly bean. 
          . 4.Lee bought 5 suckers.
            5. Amy bought 4 jelly beans plus 1 sucker.                                                                                   6. Omar bought 3 pieces of gum plus 1 jelly bean.
            7. Ed bought 2 pieces of each kind of candy.
            8. Jill bought 3 suckers and 1 jelly bean.
            9. Rob bought 4 pieces of gum and 1 sucker.
           10. Circle the name of the person who spent the most.
           11. Underline the name of the person who spent the least.
           12. Write your name on the top of your page."
(Now we are going back to Book (57) on LifeSaversª)
 6. What happens after you chew a LifeSaversª candy? Students could map the process 
     of digestion and label on a blank tongues which areas pick up sweet, salty, sour,
     bitter, and no taste.
 7.  Invite (a) nurse to discuss first aid and basic safety.
 8. Invite a police officer to demonstrate safety while walking, riding bikes, being
     around animals, and riding on a bus or in a car.
 9. Invite a police officer to do a bicycle inspection. .
10. Invite (a) dietitian to discuss good eating habits and the importance of a good
      diet.
11. Have relay races by moving a LiffeSaversª candy across the floor using a straw
      in the mouth.
12. Make LifeSaversª necklaces.
13. Using paper, crayons, glue, and LifeSaversª, make designs of people and animals.
14. Have a safety poster contest. Each (child) must pick a safety rule to illustrate.
15. To reinforce safety rules, read examples of (childrens) behaviors and have students
      respond by holding up a red "not safe" card or a green "safe" card.
 
 
Lifesaver Science Estimation
Estimate--guess
Dissolve--disappear from sight: melt away
 
We are going to estimate how long it will take for a LifeSaversª candy to dissolve and disappear. We will use two different kinds of water--warm and cool.
 
  1. In which water temperature do you think the candy will dissolve first?________________
       Explain.______________________________________________________________________
        _____________________________________________________________________________
        ______________________________________________________________________________  
 2. I estimate that the candy in warm water will dissolve in ______hour(s)______minutes.
 3. I estimate that the candy in cool water will dissolve in ______hour(s)______minutes.
 4. Which candy dissolved first?_______________________________________________________
     How long did it take?______hour(s)______minute(s)
     Which candy dissolved second?____________________________________________________
     How long did it take?______hour(s)______minute(s)
     Was your estimation correct?________
 
Lifesaver Math
 
________Each LifeSaversª candy has ten calories. You ate three LifeSaversª. How many
              calories did you eat?
 
________You ate five LifeSaversª. How many calories did you eat?
 
 
_________A roll of LifeSaversª has eleven candies in it. You ate three. How many are left?
 
 
_________You are hungry and eat two more LifeSaversª. How many are left?
 
 
_________The next day you eat five more candies. How many are left?
 
 
_________A roll of LifeSaversª costs 40 cents. How much money would it cost to buy two rolls?
 
 
_________How much more would it cost for four rolls?
 
 
Lifesaver Opposites
Fill in the blanks with the opposite of the word that is in bold print.
 
LifeSaversª are hard, not_____________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are round, not_____________________________________.
 
LifeªSaversª are ___________________________, not sour.
 
LifeSaversª are an______________________invention, not a new one.
 
LifeSaversª are_________________________, not bad.
 
 
Lifesaver Similes
After a ...discussion on similes, fill in the blanks with a proper simile.
 
LifeSaversª are as hard as________________________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are as round as______________________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are as sweet as______________________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are as old as_______________________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are as good as_________________________________________________________.
 
 
A Rainbow of Colors!
Assorted LifeSaversª come in four bright colors--red, orange, yellow, and green. Under each color, list things that belong in that category.
 
Things That Are Red
 
 
 
 
 
Things That Are Green
 
 
 
 
 
Things That Are Yellow
 
 
 
 
 
Things That Are Orange
 
 
 
 
 
(Grandma's Book (7) has some math problems using colors as follows:)
 
Colored Products
(Use a page with 110 squares on it and the instructions say you will not use the bottom 60)
1. With a black crayon, color the square that has the answer to 2 X 7.
 2. Use a red crayon to color the square that has the answer to 4 X 6.
 3. Use a yellow crayon to color the square that has the answer to 7 X 7.
 4. Use a green crayon to circle the answer to 5 X 7.
 5. Use a blue crayon to underline the answer to 6 X 6.
 6. Put a brown X on the answer to 4 X 7.
 7. Put a red X on the answer to 4 X 4.
 8. Put a black circle around the answer to 3 X 7.
 9. Put a yellow circle around the answer to 6 X 5.
10. Use a green crayon to underline the answer to 3 X 6.
11. Use a red crayon to underline the answer to 4 X 5.
12. Put a green X on the answer to 3 X 4.
13. Put a blue circle around the answer to 6 X 7.
14. Use a brown crayon to underline the answer to 2 X 6.
15. Put your name in the upper right-hand corner.
 
(Now We Will Finish up the Unit  on LifeSaversª, read the information on the label and answer the following questions.)
 
Read the Label
What is the name of this candy?______________________________________________________
 
How many flavors are in this roll?_______________________________________________________
 
How many candies are in this roll?______________________________________________________
 
How many ounces does it weigh?________________________________________________________
 
Oz, means_____________________________________________________________
 
How many calories are in each piece?________________________________________________
 
Name four colors found in a roll of the candies:
 
   ________________________________           _____________________________________
 
  ________________________________            ______________________________________
 
Name the ingredients:
 
     S_________R, C______________, S_____________________P
 
Artificial C______________S
 
Where Are Lifesaversª Made?
 
  1. Look on your roll of LifeSaversª. Where were they made?___________________________
  2. Is the factory north, south, east, or west of your state?____________________________
  3. LifeSaversª are made in the state of ___________________________________________
  4. Which color candy is your favorite?____________________________________________
  5. On a United States map, use your favorite color to color in the state where the factory is. If you were to travel to the factory, what states would you travel through?
 
 
 
 
 
(Grandma is going to finish the unit tomorrow.)
 
 
 

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