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Grandma's Place A Natural Learning Center

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More of Calendar History for Summer August

Posted on October 2, 2014 at 3:37 PM Comments comments (62)
I read more of the blogs posted in, thanks for the added information. I found out many comments were placed in spam because they were articles to sell. Grandma is going to check them out she may be able to use some things if people want to cooperate with her. I am sorry! Grandma cannot wait until she gets to tell you more on real estate and decorating. Some very simple messages. I really did like the one on the sofa fitting. Grandma has a hard time deciding to move her sofa forward closer to the fireplace, giving space behind where a table is usually put. My decorating is not fancy and many times I make due. I have learned many little tricks on a small budget and some very nice things to do. However, I must save everything till I can finish this goal first. Keep blogging, it makes my heart very strong.

Our next calendar day from Book (1) is August 11 with the following Birthdays:

August 11, 1778 Friedrich Ludwig Jahn, German teacher
who invented gymnastics, was born.

Book (1) has an activity for this it is called "Early phys ed-Tell your (children) that Friedrich Ludwig Jahn wrote books about the importance of physical education and developed rudimentary versions of today's gymnastics equipment. Are there any gymnasts in your (home)? Ask your (children) to list the kinds of physical activities they do. (My doctors say swimming is one of the best-especially for me, Grandma,  with Osteoarthritis in the knees and bending as well as walking has become a real problem.)"

August 11, 1865 Gifford Pinchot, American politician,
author, and conservationist, was born.

August 11, 1908 Don Freeman, children's author and creator of Corduroy,
was born.

Book (1) says in "Corduroy corner-To celebrate Don Freeman's birthday, gather copies of his works for a special book corner. Titles might include Corduroy, A Pocket for Corduroy, and Dandelion. You might also invite the children to bring (out their favorite stuffed bear-or other animal-- and tell why it means so much to them. (Grandma used to believe it would be fun to have the children make a little zoo or corner for all the different animals in our world.)"

August 11, 1921 Alex Haley, American author who wrote
Roots and coauthored The Autobiography of Malcolm X, was born.

August 11, 1941 Steven Kroll, children's author, was born.

August 11, 1944 Joanna Cole, children's author, was born.

August 11, 1953 Hulk Hogan, American wrestler, was born.


Now we will cover the Events for August 11:

August 11, 1841 Former slave Frederick Douglass spoke at his
first antislavery conference.

Book (1) tells us in "Civil War dialogue-During the Civil War, Frederick Douglass tried to rally blacks to fight against the South and helped organize two black regiments for this purpose. Douglass also met with President Lincoln several times to discuss the problems of slavery. Ask your (children) to work ...to conduct some background research about the life of Frederick Douglass, President Lincoln's stance on slavery, and conditions in the United States during the Civil War. Have the (children) speculate about some of the things Douglass and Lincoln might have spoken about. Then have (them use (their) research to create a dialogue that might have occurred between the two. (Have the children role play out the conversation between the two men.)"

August 11, 1877 The First Satellite of the Planet Mars was
discovered by Asaph Hall, director of the U.S. Naval Observatory.

August 11, 1972 The Last U.S. Combat Troops left Vietnam.

August 11, 1984 Carl Lewis Won His Forth Gold Medal at the
Olympic Games in Los Angeles.

The Perseids Meteor Shower also Peaks on August 11.



Our Next day is August 12 with the Birthdays as follows:

August 12, 1774 Robert Southey, English poet who popularized
the fairy tale The Three Bears, was born.

Book (1) has an activity for Southey's birthday called "Telling different tales-In honor of Robert Southey's birthday, collect several different editions of The Three Bears. Read one edition aloud, then ...(have the children) read the other editions of this fairy tale, noting the similarities and differences among them. (The children) can then vote for the edition they think has the best illustrations, the best vocabulary, the best character delineation, or any other categories they decide on." (Considering we are falling into a lot about Bears with Theodore's Bear included, Grandma has decided when you get to the Fall lessons of the Settlers it would be a good time to gather all the different bears together out there and make  lessons including this one with that of Kings and Queens, Renaissance, forests, fairy tales, other animals and animals of the forest, Halloween, Day of the Dead, or Harvest stories (one such being is The Wizard of OZ), along the line of the Fall time, etc. Then tying it into Canada, Antarctica, Alaska and the winter season along with the explorers, the United States Revolution, etc. It almost becomes a year round study with everything and ends in February, March, or April when we move into the later 1900's. 
As you recall if you do Grandma blogged sometime back which you can find on her block search about Theodore Roosevelt not wanting to shoot a baby bear. Grandma looked it up tonight on the computer and one web said he was hunting with the Governor of Missouri in Missouri and the people in the party had tied up a bear for Theodore to shoot since he was known so well for his hunting skills and he thought it was inhumane and would not shoot the bear, which seems good to me. The papers wrote it up and someone developed the first "Teddy Bear"  naming it after Theodore Roosevelt.
A last little note here, is that this kind of teaching is called web learning where a teacher starts with a subject as Bears in an oval on a piece of paper and forms other bubbles or ovals around that it connects to and then those bubbles are connected together. It all goes into a unit. Grandma has a Bear Unit in Book (57) she just remembers that she will give to you later in another blog. This is just the way Grandma's mind Naturally works. Grandma would so much like to have a school here to share her materials as the books with. Grandma saves all kinds of recycled  items to do things with. She just has not figured out a way to get people here.Her family does not understand at all.) 

August 12, 1781 Robert Mills, American architect and 
designer of the Washington Monument, was born.

August 12, 1859 Katherine Lee Bates, American author 
who wrote the words to "America the Beautiful", was born.

August 12, 1880 Christy Mathewson, baseball star who
 became one of the first five players inducted into the 
Hall of Fame, was born.

August 12, 1955 Ann Martin, children's author and 
creator of the Baby-sitters Club series, was born.

Book (1) says in "Book ideas-Tell your (children) that Ann Martin, author of the Baby-sitters Club books, draws on her own childhood experiences in many of her books. Martin says she remembers what it felt like being a kid, and she tries to put those feelings into her books. Ask your (children) to recall a happy, sad, frightening, confusing, or thought-provoking experience they've had during the previous year, and to write a paragraph about it. Send these paragraphs to the author as suggestions for future Baby-sitters Club books."
(Grandma noticed one day how her mother wrote little notepad book she keeps all the time. When she fills one up she gets another. It is a good way to keep record of phone calls made, things that happened that day, bills to pay, and remember things. It keeps it all in one little record. A lot of people do it on a calendar. Grandma's days sometimes have just been so busy having to handle things, run in the car, and various other items in which I may not have recorded as well as reaching the true feelings about them. I did find one notebook I had business cards and other things I kept record of. I am getting ready to do a story or autobiography with my pictures-the sons have stated they have no interest in such things but maybe some of the grandchildren, or great-grandchildren will appreciate it. Grandma is learning to reach into her feeling bag of expression a little better. Maybe it will all come together soon enough. The use of your Family books, Yearbooks, and Newspapers keeps some record for you also.)

Grandma is moving on into the Events of August 12:

August 12, 1658 The First Police Force in America was 
established in New Amsterdam, now New York City.

Book (1) talks about it in "Community protectors-To mark the establishment of the first American police force, have a (family) discussion about how police, firefighters, and paramedics help protect us. Then write a ...thank-you letter to local units of each of these groups." (This is a good lesson to tie to the beginnings of the year on our safety learning and also the happening of 9-11, which is absolutely a puzzle.)

August 12, 1676 Metacomet (Philip), chief of the Wampanoag 
Indians, was killed, effectively ending King Philip's War, a bitter 
conflict between New England settlers and the Wampanoag tribe.

August 12, 1851 Isaac Singer began production of his Sewing Machine.

August 12, 1877 Thomas Edison invented the Phonograph.

August 12, 1936 Marjorie Gestring, age 13, became the 
Youngest Person to Win an Olympic Gold Medal in 
springboard diving.



Next is August 13th with the following birthdays:

August 13, 1818 Lucy Stone, American women's rights leader, was born.

August 13, 1860 Annie Oakley, American markswoman, was born.

Book (1) writes "Sharpest shooter-As a young girl, Annie Oakley showed a tremendous talent for marksmanship, beating a national rifle champion in a shooting match. She could hit a coin thrown into the air or the thin edge of a playing card at 30 paces. Her skill earned her the nickname "Little Sure Shot." Have your (children) think about their special talents. What nicknames might they give themselves? Have them use these nicknames as the basis of a self-portrait."

August 13, 1895 Bert Lanr, American actor who played the
 Cowardly Lion in The Wizard of OZ, was born.

Book (1) writes "Of cowards and courage-Your (children) are probably familiar with Bert Lahr's portrayal of the Cowardly Lion from The Wizard of Oz.Ask the children to discuss what it means to be a coward. Why is it strange to see a lion act cowardly? Can they think of ways to help someone feel less afraid?Have the kids each write a paragraph telling what they do to feel less afraid in difficult situations."

August 13, 1899 Alfred Hitchcock, English filmmaker, was born.

August 13, 1927 Fidel Castro, premier of Cuba, was born.

Now we move onto the Events:

August 13, 1521 Spanish conquistador Hernan Cortez 
captured the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, the site of 
present-day Mexico City.

August 13, 1870 Before starting down the Colorado River
 into the Grand Canyon, explorer John Wesley Powell wrote,
 "We are now ready to start on our way down the Great Unknown...."

August 13, 1889 William Gray patented the Pay Telephone.

August 13, 1961 East Germany Closed the Border Between
 East and West Berlin.

August 13, 1969 President Richard Nixon bestowed the
 Medal of Freedom on Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, 
Edwin Aldrin, and Michael Collins after their historic landing on the moon.

August 13 is also International Left-Handers Day in which Book (1) writes "Looking at lefties-On International Left-Handers Day, survey your (children) to see how many of them are southpaws. Have these (children) share the benefits and drawbacks of being left-handed with (you). Then encourage (those children) who are right-handed to use their left hands to perform some everyday tasks--sharpening their pencils, writing, turning a light switch off and on, opening a jar, and so on. Have lefties try these tasks with their right hands." 




August 14th begins with the following birthdays:

August 14, 1777 Hans Christian Oersted, danish chemist 
and physicist who discovered the principle of electromagnetism, was born.

Book(1) writes "Magnetic attraction-Danish physicist and chemist Hans Christian Oersted discovered that an electrical current produces a magnetic field. On his birthday, demonstrate this principle to your (children). You'll need the following materials: a 2-foot-long piece of insulated wire with the ends stripped; a 2-inch nail; a D cell battery; and some metal paper clips. Spread the paper clips on a table. Ask your (children) to test whether the battery, the nail, or the wire by themselves will attract the paper clips. (They won't.) Next, coil the wire tightly around the nail, leaving 2 inches of wire free at each end. Then press the stripped ends of the wire against the top and bottom of the battery. Now have your (children) test whether the paper clips will be attracted. (They will.) Tell your students that they've just created an electromagnet."

August 14, 1918 Alice Provensen, children's author, was born.

August 14, 1959 Earvin "Magic" Johnson, American basketball
 player, was born.



Next will be given the Events for August 14:

August 14, 1511 Michelangelo's Paintings On the Sistine 
Chapel Ceiling were first exhibited.

August 14, 1784 The First Russian Colony in Alaska was 
founded at Three Saints Bay on Kodiak Island.

August 14, 1894 Angry at being fired, Jerry Murphy, the 
city jailer at Leavenworth, Kan., unlocked the prison 
doors and Released all the Prisoners.

August 14, 1919 A U.S Aeromarine flying boat dropped a 
bag of mail on the deck of the liner Adriatic. 
This was the First Airmail Delivery at Sea.

August 14, 1935 President Franklin Roosevelt signed the 
Social Security Act, creating the nation's first system of 
retirement income.

August 14, 1945 Japan Surrendered, ending World War II.

August 14, 1976 To raise money for the Monticello, N.Y., 
Community General Hospital, two teams began a 
Marathon Softball Game.

An activity given in Book (1) is called "Can you spell "fund-raiser"?-The softball marathon played in Monticello, N.Y., in 1976 lasted from 10:00 a.m. on Aug. 14 to 4 p.m. the following day. The 365-inning game, which ended in a score of 492-467, raised $4,000 for a local hospital. Why not organize a fund-raiser for your (church or something in your community.) Your (children) can solicit pledges for a marathon spelling test. Sponsors can donate a penny per word. Have the children decide how to use the money--.... Include words from all of your (children's) textbooks on the test. Start in the morning and continue until lunch (if feasible). ... . The (children) could earn one penny for each correctly spelled word."

August 14, 1985 Japan launched Spacecraft-Planet A on a 
Mission to Halley's Comet.




Our next day to dip into is August 15 starting with the Birthdays:

August 15, 1769 Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of the French, was born.

August 15, 1915 Turkle Brinton, children's author, was born.

August 15, 1922 Leonard Baskin, children's illustrator, was born.

The Events for this day are as follows:

August 15, 1057 Macbeth, the king of Scotland, was murdered 
by Malcolm III, the son of King Duncan.

August 15, 1914 The SS Ancon became the First Ship to Travel 
Through the Panama Canal.

August 15, 1943 Sergeant Edward Dzuba received the Legion of 
Merit for his Recipes for Using Leftovers.

Book (1) says in "Lots of leftovers-Challenge your (children) to come up with zany uses for common leftovers. For instance, leftover mashed potatoes could be used to patch roads, Leftover pudding might make great finger paint. Compile (the children's) suggestions in a ...book titled "Fresh Uses for Leftovers."

August 15, 1947 Great Britain granted independence to India.

August 15, 1948 The Republic of Korea was proclaimed.

August 15, 1963 A total of 2,600 books were selected as 
the nucleus for an official White House Library.

Book (1) says in "Personal library plans-If your (children) could select 10 books for their own libraries, which titles would they pick? Have them each make a list, then group the books into genres. What's the most popular genre among your (children)? Combine (their) lists and post as a reading reference for the kids. Have (them) design bookplates for books that are added to the (your) library."

August 15, 1969 The Woodstock Music and Arts Fair opened in 
upstate New York.

August 15, 1970 Pat Palinkas of the Orlando Panthers became the 
First Woman to Play in a Professional Football Game.

August 15, 1985 South African President P.W. Botha publicly 
rejected Western pleas to abolish apartheid.

August 15 is also National Relaxation Day so Book (1) says in "Just relax-Ask your (children) to describe what they like to do for relaxation. Their responses might include sedentary activities, such as reading or watching television, as well as more active pursuits, such as playing a sport or taking a walk. Afterward, discuss why it isn't always necessary to "take it easy" in order to relax."



The next day is August 16 with the following Birthdays:

August 16, 1845 Gabriel Lippman, French physicist and 
inventor of color photography, was born.

August 16, 1917 Matt Christopher, children's author, was born

Book (1) writes "Favorite games-Most of Matt Christopher's books for children are on sports topics. When Christopher was growing up, his favorite sport was baseball. Despite a lack of equipment, he and his friends played the game in his backyard, which was cement. The boys used broken broom handles and tennis balls instead of bats and baseballs. They used flat rocks to mark the bases. Ask your (children) if they've ever improvised in order to play a favorite game. Then have them interview their parents about favorite games they played as children. Have the kids share their information with the class."


Next are the Events for August 16:

August 16, 1858 Queen Victoria of England and President 
James Buchanan of the United States exchanged greetings 
by means of the New Transatlantic Cable.

August 16, 1861 The federal government Prohibited Trade 
between the States of the Union and the Confederacy.

August 16, 1916 The United States and Canada signed 
a Treaty to Protect Migratory Birds.

Book (1) says in "Birds of a feather-Tell Your (children) that the Arctic tern is the champion migratory bird. This bird travels from one pole to the other, making a round-trip flight of over 20,000 miles. Divide the class into teams, and have each team learn about the migratory pattern of a different bird, such as ducks, geese, and swallows. Compare the number of miles traveled by each species on a class chart."

August 16, 1920 Baseball player Roy Chapman was hit 
in the Head by a Pitched Ball and died the following day.
 He was the only professional ballplayer to die in that manner.

Book (1) points out for Safety Lessens "Sports safety-Do your (children) think sports are safer today than in 1920, when Roy Chapman was fatally injured in a baseball game? List several sports--baseball, football, hockey, soccer--on... . For each sport, have (the children) identify the equipment and rules that help protect players from injury. (There has been some specials on TV concerning the injuries children are getting from playing ball games and if they helmets should be redone.) Have any of your (children) ever been injured playing sports? Ask them to share their experiences. Then ask (them) to suggest a type of equipment, rule change, or other strategy that might have prevented the injury. Afterward, invite a team coach or physical education instructor to discuss sports safety with your (children)."

August 16, 1977 Rock-and roll idol Elvis Presley Died.



The next day of study is August 17 with the following Birthdays:

August 17, 1786 Davy Crockett, American frontiersman, 
soldier, and politician, was born.

Book (1) writes about it in "American folk hero-Frontiersman, scout, soldier, and politician, Davy Crockett was among the more colorful figures of his day. Have your (children) conduct background research about Crockett's life, then prepare a time line showing his varied adventures. What important events in U.S history occurred during Crockett's lifetime? Have students list these events on the time line. (You could either make a raccoon hat or a log cabin or both on a poster or cut them out to paste little papers on. Else list them on a study paper or note cards if space is limited. You can even add them in with your other line papers to hang up.)"

August 17, 1926 Myra Cohn Livingston, children's poet, was born.

Book (1) writes about it in "Enlightening poetry-Read aloud to your (children) from Myra Cohn Livingston's Light and Shadow. Ask the kids to list the places Livingston finds light--a toll bridge, the waves, a sign in a store window. Where does she discover shadows? (In the forest, leaning against a door, across stone walls.) Have (the children) work...to list other places or where they'd find light and shadow. Have them write their own poems about light and shadow on sheets of white construction paper, then mount the sheets on black construction paper. Display their work... ." (Grandma has always felt there should be lessons about shadows, and it can also be tied to studies and experiments about the sun and the moon. Grandma has a game the children can play in which they hide behind a sheet curtain with a light shone on it in a dark room and do different things with their hands and selves for others to guess what or who they are. Another thing they do with children is to shine a light on a dark wall with the shape of their faces showing on a piece of paper taped on it to show their profiles to be drawn out and placed on background paper. You may see if you can do anything in this direction."

August 17,  1943 Robert DeNiro, American actor, was born.

Now for the Events of that day, August 17:

August 17, 1788 The town of Cincinnati (originally named 
Losantville) was founded.

Book (1) gives this activity of "City mapping-Have your (children) find Cincinnati on a map of Ohio. In what part of the state is it located? Which geographic features might have influenced the city's location?"

August 17, 1807 Robert Fulton's steamboat, the Clermont
made its first run up the Hudson River from New York to Albany.

August 17, 1877 American astronomer Asaph Hall sighted 
the second satellite of the planet Mars, naming it Phobos.

August 17, 1896 George Carmack Discovered Gold in 
Klondike Creek in the Yukon Territory of Canada. 

August 17, 1933 New York Yankee Lou Gehrig Broke the
 Record for Most Consecutive Baseball Games Played
 when he appeared in his 1,308th straight game. Gehrig
 eventually stretched his record to 2,130 games.

Book (1) presents "Record setters-How many times in a row can your (children) do something? Have the kids each keep track of the number of consecutive days they complete their homework. Who's the record setter in your (home)?

August 17, 1978 Three American balloonists completed the First Successful Transatlantic Balloon Flight, landing their craft, the Double Eagle, near Paris. They also set an endurance record of 138 hours, 6 minutes in the air.



The next day to use from Book (1) is August 18 with the following Birthdays:

August 18, 1587 Virginia Dare, the first English child born 
in America, was born.

August 18, 1774 Meriwether Lewis, American explorer and 
coleader of the Lewis and Clark expedition, was born.

August 18, 1934 Roberto Clemente, Puerto Rican baseball player, was born.

Book (1) says in "One of baseball's best-In honor of Roberto Clemente's birthday, invite your (children) to bring in their baseball cards. Does anyone have a Roberto Clemente card? If so, have that child share Clemente's statistics with (you). If not, encourage (the children) to use a sports almanac to find out about Clemente's career accomplishments. Then let the kids make a postersized Roberto Clemente baseball card."

August 18, 1937 Robert Redford, American actor, was born. 

August 18, 1944 Paula Danziger, children's author, was born.

August 18, 1954 Patrick Swayze, American actor, was born.


That is it for the birthdays now we will look at the Events for August 18:

August 18, 1856 Gail Borden patented the First Successful 
Milk-Condensing Process.

August 18, 1873 John Lucas, Charles Begole, and A.H.
 Johnson became the First Climbers to Reach the Top of 
Mt. Whitney, the highest peak in the contiguous United States.

Book (1) writes in "Mountains of information-To commemorate the first successful climb of California's highest peak, divide the rest of the states among your (children). Have the kids find out the highest points in their states, their elevations, and if applicaable, when they were first scaled and by whom, then write this information on slips of paper. Make sure the children sign their names on the slips they do. Collect the slips and hold a ..."mountain bee" by reading aloud the information and having the kids guess which sate the high point is in. Afterward, have your (children) record their facts on mountain-shaped sheets of construction paper scaled according to height. Arrange their work on (a wall or poster board) to resemble a mountain range, then label the display "Mountains of Information." (If you do not have a big enough basement or somekind of a wall or have a bulletin board because a poster board I do not feel will be big enough; Grandma feels you could collect them together to form a book or put in a folder (for a book would be the nicest))."

August 18, 1902 Major League Baseball's First Unassisted 
Triple Play was made by Henry O'Hagen.

August 18, 1914 President Woodrow Wilson issued his 
"Proclamation of Neutrality," aimed at keeping the 
United States out of World War I.

August 18, 1919 The Anti-Cigarette League of America was organized.

Book (1) writes "Thumbs down for cigarettes-To mark the anniversary of the founding of the Anti-Cigarette League,have each (child) choose one of the many good reasons not to smoke, think of an appropriate slogan, and create a poster."

August 18, Gerald Ford was Nominated for President on 
the first ballot at the Republican National Convention in 
Kansas City, Mo.



Next day is August 19 with the following Birthdays in the beginning:

August 19, 1646 John Flamsteed, English astronomer, was born.

Book (1) writes about him in "Star man-John Flamsteed, who served as England's first Astronomer Royal, cataloged about 3,000 stars. Challenge (your children) to list as many stars as they can think of --along with the constellations the stars are in, if the (children) know--in 5 minutes. Award one point for each correct star and one point for each correct constellation. ...(Award them with their hard work.)"

August 19, 1871 Orville Wright, American aviation pioneer
 and (coinventer) of the airplane, was born.

August 19, 1902 Ogden Nash, American poet known for
 his humorous verse, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Animal poetry-Celebrate Ogden Nash's birthday by reading aloud his portraits of animals--for example, "The Sea Gull" or "the Turtle." Then have your (children) develop comic-strip versions of the poems or follow Nash's rhyme schemes to develop their own humorous animal poems."

August 19, 1931 Willie Shoemaker, American jockey, was born.

August 19, 1938 Vicki Cobb, children's author, was born.

August 19, Bill Clinton, 42nd president of the United States, was born.


Now for August 19th Events:

August 19, 1692 Six residents of Salem, Mass., were executed 
after being Accused of Practicing Witchcraft.

August 19, 1775 A Horde of Earwigs infested houses and 
gardens in Stroud, England. Residents fled to the surrounding 
countryside.

Book (1) writies "Insect invasion-Show your (children) illustrations or photographs of earwigs. These insects have short, borny forewings, a pair of forceps at the end of the abdomen, and biting mouthparts. Then ask the kids to work ...to develop a horror play titled "Invasion of the Earwigs" or a mock front page for a Stroud newspaper story on the insect invasion."

August 19, 1812 The U.S. frigate Constitution won the nickname 
"Old Ironsides" by defeating the British frigate Guerriere in a War 
of 1812 battle.

August 19, 1971 The Nature Conservancy and the U.S. Forest 
Service announced plans to save the 50 to 60 California 
Condors left in the wild.

August 19, 1991 A group of Communist hardliners led by the 
vice president, defense minister, interior minister, and head 
of the KGB attempted a Coup in the Soviet Union, detaining 
President Mikhail Gorbachev in his dacha in the Crimea and 
dispatching tanks to secure the streets of Moscow.

August 19 is also known as National Aviation Day.



Now for the beginning of August 20th with the Birthdays:

August 20, 1785 Oliver Hazard Perry, U.S. naval officer 
and hero of the War of 1812, was born.

August 20, 1946 Connie Chung, American TV reporter 
and anchor, was born.


Now for the Events of August 20th:

August 20, 1741 Alaska was Discovered by the Danish 
explorer Vitus Bering.

Book (1) writes "Close continents-Vitus Bering was commissioned by Russia to find out whether Asia and North America were connected. When he sailed through the Bering Straight on his first voyage, dense fog obscured his view, and Bering didn't realize how close he was to the North American continent. On his second voyage, in 1741, he spotted Alaska. Have your students locate the Bering Strait on a map and use the map scale to determine the distance separating Asia and North America at the closest point."

August 20, 1857 After being harpooned by the crew of the 
whaling ship Ann Alexander, a Whale Attacked and 
destroyed the vessel.

Book (1) writes about these "Whaling woes-Tell your (children) that during the period the Ann Alexander sailed, whales were hunted primarily for their blubber (a thick layer of fat beneath the skin), which was used to make oil. The oil was used as lamp fuel before the invention of kerosene. List several whale species ... .--for example, blue, finback, right, humpback, and sperm. Have (the children) each investigate the status of one of these species. (All the whales listed above are endangered.) Ask (the children) to draw and color a picture of (different) whales, then attach a paragraph describing (their) size, ... feeding habits, and where (they) can be found."

August 20, 1912 The Plant Quarantine Act went into effect, 
placing restrictions on the entry of plants into the United States.

August 20, 1934 The Comic Strip"Li'l Abner" first appeared.

August 20, 1940 Winston Churchill paid Tribute to the 
Royal Air Force by saying, "Never in the field of Human 
conflict was so much owed by so many to so few."

August 20, 1968 James McAdam, Jr., snagged the 
Largest Sea Bass on Record--563 pounds.

Book (1) says in "A large mass of bass-Can your (children) imagine how huge a 563-pound fish is? To help them visualize this big bass, ask each child how much he or she weighs. Add the weights together until the total reaches (around) 563 pounds. How many children is that?"

August 20, 1977 The unmanned spacecraft Voyager 2 
was launched. Its destinations were Jupiter, Saturn, 
Uranus, and Neptune.

August 20, 1985 The original Xerox Copy Machine was donated to the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.

Book (1) writes "Museum-quality pieces?-Ask your (children) whether they think the first Xerox copy machine deserves a place in the Smithsonian. Why or why not? What kinds of items do they think will be in the Smithsonian 100 years from now? Make a ... list."

(Grandma will finish the rest of August Calendar History very soon.)

Beginning of August Summer Calendar History

Posted on September 17, 2014 at 6:27 AM Comments comments (20)
Here we are moving int the August Calendar History Lessons for Summer at the end of the Year.

The Project of the Month for August is what Book (1) called" American Artists-Celebrate American Arts Appreciation Month by having your (children) learn about American painters, poets, and authors.
  • Show your (children) prints or photographs of paintings by artists such as Andrew Wyeth, Norman Rockwell, James Whistler, Grandma Moses, and Mary Cassatt. Ask the kids to compare and contrast the artists' styles. Do the artists have favorite kinds of subjects? Post pictures your (children) create in a style of their own.
  • Share with the (family) poems by such poets as Robert Frost, Emily Dickinson, Nikki Giovanni, and Jack Prelutsky. What do your (children) like best about the poems and their imagery? Encourage the children to memorize a favorite poem, then recite it to you. (The children ) might also like to illustrate their poems.
  •  Gather copies of books by such authors as Mark Twain, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Louisa May Alcott, and Beverly Cleary. Ask your (children) to read at least one book by an American American writer this month, then prepare a create book report-perhaps a mobile, an interview with the main character, or a version of the story for younger children."
  • Extend this activity by creating an "American Artists Museum" by designing the exhibits, conducting further research about artists, and preparing reports and illustrations. The children can share and teach other children and family members with their museum.

August is the birthday of my other son, one of his sons, and my mom; making both my sons, a grandson, and my mom all Leo's, well enough my brother born in April; no wonder I am so overpowered. They just haven't figured out that Aquarious which is what I am is the water they drink or the knowledge of learning. Enough of that considering many are going to tell me it is all hogwash.

August's Monthly Observances are the following:

American Arts Appreciation Month
National Catfish Month
National Sandwich Month
Romance  Awareness Month(A lot can be done here in teaching children the difference in sexual relationship's and those in true love and what makes good romance. It is what puzzles a boy more than anything and it will teach girls how to make their lives more fullfilled, warning them not to get tied up into  fake romantic words boys or men may play on them. Teach them how to get to know each other and not fall wrong directions with fake romance. Teach them how to know who they are and if they want involved.)
Water Quality Month (Ties the month to the beginning lessons of pollution, etc. and our Earth along with the lesson in June and July.)

Weeklong Events are the following:

National Smile Week(week beginning on the first Monday)
National Clown Week(first full week and ties to the lessons in June on circuses)
Elvis International Tribute Week(week ending with Aug. 16)
National Aviation Week (week that includes Aug. 19 and it could tie Aviation to the study of Space)

Special Days and Celebrations are the following:

American Family Day (first Sunday)
Friendship Day (first Sunday)
Daughter's Day(second Sunday)

The Universe for Space Week in July for Summer

Posted on September 13, 2014 at 10:28 PM Comments comments (30)
This Unit is out of Book (57) and it is also can be infiltrated into the beginning lessons of the year by starting out with lesson about our Earth and its elements of Air, Land, and Water.


                                   "Exploring The Universe by Teddy Meister

The vastness of space and the secrets it holds unfold a little more each time a shuttle is launched or a probe sent into deep space. Our fascination for "what's out there" has existed throughout the ages. As we become more technologically sophisticated, our visions of space stations and interplanetary explorations and travel become more realistic. A study of our own "space environment," planet Earth, and its relationship to other objects in the "space community" (solar system) can provide us with a kindred linking to the cosmos.

Cosmos (from the Greek Kosmos)
Order, harmony, hence the world as an orderly system. "The universe as an embodiment of order and harmony; the system of order and harmony combined in the universe." Webster's New Twentieth Century Dictionary of the English Language, Second Edition.


                       The Cosmic Focus--Galaxies

Our sun is in a vast group of stars called a galaxy. Our galaxy, the great Milky Way, contains tens of billions of stars, some that are two million light-years away. A light-year is the distance light travels in one year, or about 5,880,000,000,000 miles per year! It travels at the rate of 186,000 miles per second. This means that light reaching our eyes from stars in this galaxy left those distant stars about two million years ago. An incredible thought to consider. We are one tiny part of the Milky Way, where 100 billion other stars also exist. If each star had a name, it would probably take 4000 years to say their names if we could say one every second without stopping! Other galaxies are so tremendously far away it is almost impossible to imagine. Some travel as fast as 70,000 miles a second and collectively contain about as many stars as there are gains of sand on all the world's seashores.

Cosmic People--Sir William Herschel (1738-1822)
This English astronomer and his son conducted studies at the end of the 18th century to count stars and observe the shape of the Milky Way. They tried to estimate the approximate size of the system and the relationship of earth withing the system.

Comprehending the Cosmos
  1. Read more about the experiments of Sir William Herschel and his son. What were their conclusions? Were their theories accepted? Explain their findings. Start a card file of "Cosmic People." Add a biography card for each of the people you find in this unit.
  2. In the 1920s, American astronomer Harlow Shapely realized earth was not in the center of the galaxy. He observed a sphere-like halo around a point many thousands of light-years away. Make a sketch of the Milky Way. Can you see the special shape it has? Can you estimate where our solar system is?
  3. The Pleiades, or Seven Sisters, is an example of a galactic cluster of stars within the Milky Way. It has six stars visible to the naked eye. Create a "follow the dots" picture of the Pleiades.
  4. If the sun were closer to the edge of the Milky Way, how might the galaxy appear to us? Explain your opinion and why you think this.
  5. Galaxies are among the most distant objects in space we can study. Quasars are even further away. Find out about these distant "space cousins." How are galaxies and quasars alike? How are they different?
  6. Galaxies are among the most distant objects in space we can study. Quasars are even further away. Find out about these distant "space cousins." How are galaxies and quasars alike? How are they different?
  7. If some type of life form did exist elsewhere in space, what might this life form look like? Draw several sketches of animal life and several of plant life.
  8. Read some science fiction stories. Here is a starter list to select from:
          Bradbury, Ray. The Martian Chronicles
          Burnford, Sheila. The Incredible Journey
          Heinlein, Robert. Have Space Suit, Will Travel
          L'Engle, Madeleine, A Wrinkle in Time
          Lewis, C.S. The Chronicles of Narnia
          Strasser, Todd. The Mall from Outer Space
          Wells, H. G. The War of the Worlds

                                         The Cosmic Focus--The Moon

Our satellite, or moon, is about 2160 miles in diameter. With its lack of air and water, the moon cannot support human life. There is no gravity, but the moon still affects our lives every day through the movement of ocean tides. It exerts a pull on the water on the part of the earth nearest to it. On the opposite side, where the pull is least the water bulges away from the moon. These tides occur at different times of the day and depend on the position of the moon as it travels around earth. High tides are about twelve hours apart; low tides are between each high tide. One of the highest daily tides can be seen between Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in the Bay of Fundy. Many times this tide will rise as much as seventy feet above low tide levels.

Cosmic People--Galileo Galilei (1564-1642)

This Italian astronomer was the first to sight the mountains of the moon, the four largest satelites of Jupiter, the phases of Venus, and the spots on the sun. His theories and principles of the pendulum were applied to regulate clocks and standardize timekeeping.

Comprehending the Cosmos

  1. The moon has different "looks" as it travels around the earth each month. These are called moon phases. Describe the phases of the moon and draw an illustration of each.
  2. A person's weight on the moon is one-sixth what it would be on earth. If you weighed 90 pounds here, you would weigh just fifteen pounds there--a great way to lose weight. Compute your weight and the weight of ten classmates. Display your findings on a graph entitled "Earth Weight, Moon Weight."
  3. An eclipse of the moon, or lunar eclipse, can only occur during a full moon and can be seen everywhere on the side of the earth facing the moon. It lasts about two hours, and the earth's shadow causes it to look reddish. Explain how this differs from an eclipse of the sun, or solar eclipse. Draw and label a diagram to represent your explanation.
  4. NASA's early landings on the moon in the 1960s provided us with tremendous first-hand knowledge. Rilles (canals) and craters were explored and studied in greater detail than ever before. "Seas" were examined and many rock samples brought back to earth. Create a news article that might have appeared in your (family newspaper) about these events. Think up a catchy story headline.
  5. From Earth to the Moon, by Jules Verne, and 2001: A Space Odyssey, by Arthur C. Clarke, are two excellent stories about the moon and space exploration and are quite different in style. Select one to read. When finished, design a new book jacket for it. (Can't get the titles of these books to Italized nor be underlined I am sorry.).
  6. Space technologists and scientists have concluded that if there were "hospital" facilities built on the moon, someday people could go there for medical treatment. You would heal ten times faster from surgery, cuts, and wounds than you do on earth! Lunar explorations of the 1960s also brought about the development of freeze-dried foods. Many benefits for all people have been outgrowths of the space program. Write a speech you could present to a group of legislators who wanted to cut back funding for space programs. What would some of your arguments be to convince them not to do this?
  7. Gather books, articles, and some of the completed activities from this section and organize a "Moon Resource Box" for other classes to use in a study of this kind.
  8. Begin to gather all materials, activities, filmstrips(movies and videos from youtube and of your own), and pictures to organize a "Cosmically Speaking" learning center. Add the work of (the children) and think of how this can be a culminating activity. You might invite (others) to visit.

                                         The Cosmic Focus--Objects in Space

Meteors are small solid masses entering earth's atmosphere at such tremendous speeds that friction is generated when the objects "rub" against earth's air. We see the meteor as a "falling star." Most are as tiny as pins. About one million reach our atmosphere every hour! Larger meteorites can weigh many tons. One of the largest, found in 1920 in southwest Africa, was 9 feet by 8 feet and weighed 66 tons. Among other objects in space are comets, from the Latin word coma, meaning hair, for the great tail of dust and gas streaming from it. When comets are within 100 million miles or so from the sun they are the most distinguishable.

Nebulas appear as great clouds of gas far out in space. Appearing as rings, they glow like distant stars as they are lighted from stars nearby. Another unusual star form in space is a nova, which is a star that has exploded and is thousands of times brighter than before. Black holes have their origins in novas.
In the great mass of the universe, many objects are left to be discovered. Among the millions and billions of galaxies and the space between them, the cosmos gives us a lot to think about (as follows:0
  • The earth travels around the sun at a speed of about 18 miles per second. How fast does it travel per minute? per hour?
  • A telescope called the Hale reflector has a 200-inch mirror and can detect the light of a candle 15,000 miles away. Construct a simple telescope of your own.
  • The largest known asteroid is Ceres, which measures about 620 miles in diameter.
  • Some believe the end of the dinosaurs was due to a meteor crashing to the earth. Find out more about this theory.
  • Besides the sun, planets, and moons, the solar system includes millions of asteroids and trillions of comets and meteoroids.


Cosmic People--Edmund Halley (1656-1742)

Halley's Comet is named for this English astronomer who first observed it in 1682. He was able to calculate the orbit of this comet and predict a return sighting for 1758 and every 75 years after that. He used Newton's theories and was the first to accurately apply the laws of motion to movement of the comet. The most recent sighting was in 1982.(There may have been one closer in time to us than that Grandma is not sure.)

Comprehending the Cosmos

  1. In recent times, the Van Allen belts are using the diagram to communicate your ideas.
  2. Black holes are fascinating objects fro study. Find out about their relationship to novas and prepare a five-minute talk. Use note cards to summarize what you have learned.
  3. The Crab Nebula, a great cloud of gas stretching over 17 billion miles, has been spreading about 684 miles  per second. Get an eyedropper of water and some blotter paper. Squeeze a drop of water onto the blotter and time the spreading speed. Do this several times, recording the speed each time. When it dries, measure the diameter of each drop. This will give you some idea of what the Crab Nebula is doing.
  4. How did Edmund Halley discover the comet named for him? What gave him the idea? Write a brief report about Halley's life and discoveries. Compute the next visit of the comet.
  5. Make an "Object in Space" scrapbook. Illustrate and explain each of the objects shown in bold print on the previous page. Add others as you read and study.
  6. A long time ago people created stories about space objects they observed but didn't understand. Create a story based on one of these objects. Add it to your scrapbook.

                            The Cosmic Focus--Planets

Among all the planets in the solar system, our home on planet earth provides a "friendly" environment for human survival. Curiosity about the rest of the "space neighborhood" has persisted since early times. We have learned much but still have a long way to travel on the road to knowledge.

Cosmic People--Johannes Kepler (1571-1630)

A German astronomer, Kepler's laws describe the motion of planets in their orbits. He stated that planet orbits are ellipses with the sun as a common focus, planets form orbits of equal areas, and planetary revolutions are mathematically proportional. His laws are true today and are still applied by scientists studying the nature of space.

Comprehending the Cosmos

  1. Construct a mobile of the solar system. Use a wire hanger. Think about a scale first so that the sun is the largest and (go to)  the smallest.
  2. On May 4, 1989, the deep-space probe Magellan was launched from space shuttle Atlantis. A special radar system in the probe can figure out the shape and height of a planet's surface features. Recently, more detailed views of Venus were transmitted and released to the public. If you were a NASA scientist, what questions would you want answered about Venus? List four or five questions.
  3. Why is Magellan a good name for this probe? Who was the real Magellan? What did he do? Write and explain what you think.
  4. How are Magellan, Columbus, and the Vikings like our astronauts today? What common traits do they all have? Do all explorers need these same traits? What do you think?
  5. Look at a planetary comparison chart as you research and extend your own space knowledge. Which is the largest in size? Make an ordered list of the planets from largest to smallest. What other comparisons can be made from the chart? Most moons? Coldest? Longest year?

  Planet         

 Distance
from Sun

  Diameter
  in Miles
  Number
 of Moons
    Axis
 Rotation
Sun Rev
 Features

  Mercury






 
     Venus







     Earth
      93
millions miles
   7,900
      1
  24 hours
  365 1/4
     days
3/4 water
  life support

       Mars







   Jupiter







    Saturn







   Uranus







  Neptune













  
          6.  What if interplanetary travel were possible? Create a travel poster to lure tourists to one of
               the planets. Think of special clothing, equipment, and supplies they would need to pack
               for the trip. How long will it take to get there?
          7.  A planet (instead of) Pluto has been discovered! ...write a description for what it might be
               like.(Grandma is not sure on this yet.)

                                      The Cosmic Focus--The Sun

The internet temperature of this ever-burning star is estimated at about 27,000,000° F. This gigantic energy machine uses four million tons of matter per second to produce energy. It is so huge that a million planets the size of earth could fit inside! Ninety-three million miles from us, it takes the sun's light about eight minutes to journey here traveling at 186,000 miles per second. With a diameter of 1,392,00 km, it is "fixed" in position, as are all stars. Great shooting flames (solar prominence) are hundreds of thousands of miles high. As the center of our solar system, it is truly an awesome sight to behold. It is important to every living organism on planet earth.

Cosmic People-- Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543)

Copernicus was a Polish monk who discovered that the sun, not the earth, is the body around which the planets revolve. His research and experiments during the period in which he lived were not popular and were not accepted until much later. (People then believed the earth was the center of the solar system and everything revolved around it.)

Comprehending the Cosmos

  1. Corona and sunspots are related to the sun. What are they? Find an explanation of each and record the definitions.
  2. Sunlight, or white light, is divided into seven colors known as the spectrum. Take a prism and a sheet of paper outside. Squat down so that the sunshine is over your shoulder and behind you. Move the prism in front of you so that the sunlight passes through the prism. Set the sheet of paper on the ground so that when the sunlight is angled just right through the prism, it will pass through the opposite side in a rainbow of colors you can see on the paper.
  3. The same principle of light passing through a prism also applies to a rainbow. When moisture is in the air, it acts as a prism and causes the spectrum, or rainbow, to become visible to the naked eye. The colors will always be in the same order: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet. Create a poem about rainbows. Investigate refraction and diffraction of light.
  4. Earth receives less than 1/2,000,000,000 of the total amount of energy the sun sends out. If this small amount of solar energy performs all the life-sustaining functions for humans, animals, and plants, imagine what could be done by using it more as an alternative source of energy! What new ways could it e used? Can you think of a new solar-powered bicycle? Solar-powered skateboard? Draw a new solar-powered invention.
  5. An eclipse of the sun is called a solar eclipse and can occur only during the new moon. Find out about this special type of eclipse. What special precautions are needed for viewing one? When was the last eclipse of this kind in your area? When will the next one occur?
  6. The distance between the earth and sun is 93,000,000 miles. This number can also be written as 93 x 1,000,000 or 93 x 10 to the 6th. (Can you see the pattern between exponents and number of zeros used?) Wit this method of scientific notation, 10 is the base and 6 is called an exponent. Think of it as 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 x 10 or 1,000,000. Scientists prefer this method (notation) because it is much quicker! Solve the following:
          a. 8 X 10 to the 3rd                b. 10 to the 4            c. (3 X 10 to the 3rd) + (8 X 10 to the 2nd)
       7. Create a set of number problems using scientific notation. Explain and share this method
           with (others).
       8. Select other large numbers you have come across in this study of space and convert them to
           scientific notation. Make a poster showing the new way of writing larger numbers.

(This is all Grandma has on Space for now. She will cover the rest of July tomorrow and do August's Calendar History. There will not be anymore activity units from Book (57) for August.)

          

Beginning of July's Summer Lessons

Posted on September 11, 2014 at 1:15 AM Comments comments (30)
These activities are great if they can be utilized next summer because Grandma had so much trouble getting them to you. However, they can be infiltrated in Lessons now as part of lessons about Summer now and beginning activity to start the new year off.
July's big project for the month is all around the observation of July as Anti-Boredom Month. The children are to make lists with you for things that are in "three categories: fun for one, small-group fun, and large-group fun." Ok! So you ask how can I do that when it is only my children and me. There are things first that they know they like to do alone as some reading. There are things as a family or with a few friends you like to do. Then ways of developing friends and bigger groups is if you have lots of neighbor friends, a church that does a lot together, hospitals (especially for children), orphanages, child care homes or centers, old peoples homes or care places, libraries might be helpful, use your imagination, there used to be home school clubs that did some things together(it is an option). Form a favorite sport together. Help your children with this activity as much as possible. You are suppose to form it into a book. I know you can do it. Just try!

"The Monthlong Observances" from Book (1) besides Anti-Boredom Month for July are as follows:
"Blueberry Month
Hitchhiking Month
National Baked Bean Month
National Hot Dog Month
National Ice Cream Month
Picnic Month
Read an Almanac Month
Recreation and Parks Month

Weeklong Events" are as follows:
"Music for Life Week (first week)
Special Recreation Week (first full week)
Be Nice to New Jersey Week (second week)
Space Week (week including July 20)"

And "Special Days and Celebrations
Independence Day (July 4)
Bastille Day (July 14)
National Ice Cream Day (third Sunday)"
(Look into this one with September's)


July 1 has three birthdays as follows:

July 1, 1872 Louis Bleriot, French aviator who became the
first person to fly an airplane across the English Channel, was born.

July 1, 1961 Diana Spencer, princess of Wales, was born this day.

July 1, 1961 Carl Lewis, American track star, was also born.

Events for July 1 are as follows:

July 1, 1847 The First Official U.S. Postage Stamps were issued.

Book (1) writes in "People on postage-When the first American postage stamps were issued, Benjamin Franklin appeared on the 5-cent stamp and George Washington appeared on the 10-cent stamp.  Why do the children think these people were chosen? If postage stamps were being issued or the first time today, what people or images would your (children) want on the stamps? Have them draw and color their own "first issue" stamps."

July 1, 1862 Congress established the Bureau of Internal Revenue.

July 1, 1863 The Civil War Battle of Gettysburg began.

July 1, 1867 The Dominion of Canada was created.

July 1, 1898 Theodore Roosevelt and His Rough Riders
charged up San Juan Hill during the Spanish American War.

July 1, 1941 The First Television Commercial, sponsored by
Bulova Watch, was broadcast in New York.

Book (1) talks about it in "TV selling-Tell your (children) that the first television ad, broadcast on station WNBT in New York, lasted 10 seconds and cost $9. Ask your (children) how much the sponsor paid per minute. At the time, there were 4,000 TV sets in the New York area. If one person was watching each TV set when the commercial aired, how much did the sponsor pay per viewer? Ask the kids to find out how many people watch their favorite program and how much a minute of commercial time on the program costs. Then have them compare these figures with those from the first commercial."

July 1, 1963 The Five-Digit Zip Code was introduced.

July 1, 1971 The Twenty-Sixth Amendment was ratified,
giving 18-year-olds the right to vote.

July 1, 1990 A treaty unifying the Monetary Systems of
East and West Germany became effective.

July 1 is also Canada Day and National Hot Dog Month is given an activity in Book (1) this day
called "Good doggies-Celebrate National Hot Dog Month with a healthy twist. Have (the children) examine labels to determine the fat content and nutritional value of various brands of hot dogs. Then ask the kids to chart their resuls. Afterward, have them create truth-in-advertising poster guides to healthy hot dog eating (which Grandma does not follow too well, but Grandpa doesn't like hot dogs too often). (You can display you poster wherever you wish, for they are good information and Grandma definitely is for eating good food for yourselves, but costs seem to hold us all back on what is good sometimes.)"


July 2 has four birthdays as follows with two activities:

July 2, 1908 Thurgood Marshall, American jurist who became the
first black Supreme Court justice, was born.

Book (1) says in "Early judicial experiences-Tell your (children) that as a boy, Thurgood Marshall frequently got into trouble at school. Ironically, his punishment was to memorize parts of the U.S. Constitution. Marshall once remarked that he'd learned the entire document by heart by the time he graduated. Ask your (children) to write down the career paths they hope to follow. Then have them speculate on which school experiences might influence their future professions."

July 2, 1919 Jean Craighead George, children's author, was born.

July 2, 1951 Jack Gantos, children's author, was born.

July 2, 1964 Jose Canseco, Cuban-born baseball player who
became the first major-leaguer to hit 40 home runs and steal
40 bases in one season.

Book (1) says "40 is fabulous-Have your (children) celebrate Canseco's "40s feat." For the rest of July, have them keep a journal describing 40 things they did or that happened to them during the month. At month's end, have them each list their 40 things in order of greatest significance. Post the lists on a (poster called "Top 40" to post on the wall somewhere.)"

Events for July 2 are as follows:

July 2, 1776 The Continental Congress approved the
Declaration of Independence.

July 2, 1881 President James Garfield was Shot by
Charles Guiteau, a disgruntled office seeker. The
president died of his wounds 80 days later.

July 2, 1932 Franklin Roosevelt accepted the Democratic Party's
nomination for president, pledging a "New Deal for the American People."

July 2, 1964 President Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
which guaranteed the enforcement of nondiscrimination in public accommodation,
government facilities, education, and employment.

July 2, 1976 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the
Death Penalty was not cruel or unusual punishment.

July was also recognized as National Ice Cream month on July 2 saying in "Flavorful ice cream-During National Ice Cream Month, have your (children) conduct a ...survey..to find out ...(others) favorite ice cream flavors. Ask them to create a pie chart, table, or bar graph to display their findings. What are the three most popular flavors? Afterward, have the kids brainstorm for all the known flavors of ice cream. Then have them suggest some new and unusual ones--For example, jalapeno pepper, mustard and relish, or anchovy pizza. Have them write descriptive sentences telling what these flavors would taste like. Bring in a gallon of vanilla ice cream and a variety of the (children's) suggested flavorings, then let the kids create. How do their new flavors taste?" 

July 3 only has two birthdays:

July 3, 1878 George M Cohan, American playwright and composer, was born.

July 3, 1962 Tom Cruise, American actor, was born.

The events are almost just as sparing:

July 3, 1608 French explorer Samuel De Champlain founded Quebec.

July 3, 1775 George Washington took command of the
Continental Army in Cambridge, Mass.

July 3, 1863 The Battle Gettysburg ended.

Book (1) explains in "Hallowed ground-The Battle of Gettysburg proved to be one of the most decisive battles of the Civil War as well as a defining moment in the history of the nation. After e days of fighting, during which both sides suffered terrible casualties, the Confederate forces were compelled to retreat, with any realistic hope of winning the war dashed. Have your (children) read about the battle, then imagine themselves as one of the participants, whether a famous commander or a common soldier, Ask the kids to write a letter from participant to family members describing the events at Gettysburg."

July 3, 1890 Idaho became the 43rd state.

July 3, 1991 Mount Rushmore was finally officially
dedicated on its 50th anniversary. Ceremonies in 1
941 had been canceled because of World War II.

July 3 is also noted as Complement Your Mirror Day as Book (1) uses "Mirror, mirror, on the wall-Place a mirror in a corner of your (learning area accessible to the children.) Put several strips of blank paper around the mirror, then encourage the kids to write general compliments on the strips--for example, "What a great smile!" or "You look marvelous! The comments are sure to bring smiles whenever the kids look in the mirror."

July 3 is also used for Stay Out of the Sun Day which Book (1) talks about it in "Harmful rays-Ask your (children) to investigate how the sun's rays affect exposed skin. Then have the kids draw posters and create advertisements ... warning others about the dangers of too much sun. Next, invite the children to design protective hats for people to wear outdoors. You could even challenge them to design hats for animals that spend a lot of time in the sun. For example, what type of hat would an elephant wear to protect those big, floppy ears?"


July 4 in Book (1) comes out with three good activities and lots of birthdays as well as events:
The birthdays are as follows with two good activities:

July 4, 1804 Nathaniel Hawthorne, American novelist, was born.

July 4, 1826 Stephen Foster, American composer, was born.

July 4, 1872 Calvin Coolidge, 30th president of the United States, was born.

July 4, 1900 Louis Armstrong, American jazz musician, was born.

Book (1) also points out and gives an activity in "Celebrating "Satchmo-To celebrate Louis Armstrong's birthday, play "It's a Wonderful World" for your (children). Then, with the music playing in the background, have (the children) tape their impressions of why the world is wonderful or how people can work to make it better."

July 4, 1918 Ann Landers and Abigail Van Buren, twin sisters who each wrote a popular newspaper advice column, were born.

Book (1) tells about them in "Advice for kids- Observe the birthdays of advice columnists Abigail Van Buren and Ann Landers by asking each (child) to write a short letter asking for advice about a typical kid problem. Collect the letters, mix them up, with letters from others or your child and you answer them by searching for the answers. ( Grandma wants to start a column as this herself, maybe you would like to start one in your family newspaper.)"

The events are as follows for July 4:

July 4, 1776 The Continental Congress adopted the
Declaration of Independence.

July 4, 1776 The Continental Congress appointed
Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson
to Design a Seal for the United States.

July 4, 1826 John Adams and Thomas Jefferson--the second and third presidents, respectively--died

July 4, 1831 James Monroe, the fifth president , died.

July 4, 1831 The Song "America" was Introduced at a service at
Boston's Park Street Church.

July 4, 1960 The First 50-Star American Flag was raised at Fort McHenry, Md.

July 4, 1980 Pitcher Nolan Ryan recorded his 3,000th Career Strikeout.

July 4, 1986 The 100th Birthday of the Statue of Liberty was celebrated with the largest fireworks display in U.S. history.

July 4 being Independence Day has an activity of its own in Book (1) as follows:
"Independence posters-Have each of your (children) create an "Independence Day Special Event" poster that features at least five local or national events. The posters' titles should incorporate the theme of independence. Ask local business or community organizations to display the finished posters."


July 5 is booming in the following birthdays:

July 5, 1709 Etienne De Silhouette, French finance minister
who created shadow portraits as a hobby, was born.

July 5 1801 David G. Farragut, first admiral of the U.S. Navy, was born.

July 5, 1810 (P.T.)Phineas Taylor Barnum, American
showman and circus promoter, was born.

Book (1) explains it in "Barnum's gullible public-P.T. Barnum once remarked of American audiences: "There's a sucker born every minute." What do your (children) think Barnum meant? As a follow-up, ask them to listen to TV advertising claims. Do these claims promise benefits they don't back up to entice the public Barnum thought was so gullible? Have the kids complile any wild claims into a class notebook as evidence of the truth of Barnum's maxim."

July 5, 1853 Cecil Rhodes, British statesman and founder of the
Rhodes scholarship, was born.

July 5, 1857 Clara Zetkin, German women's rights advocate and
founder of International Women's Day, was born.

July 5, 1958 Bill Watterson, cartoonist and creator of
"Calvin and Hobbes", was born.

Book (1) writes about it in "Classroom cartoonists-To celebrate the birth of cartoonist Bill Watterson, introduce the children to his two main characters--Calvin and Calvin's stuffed tiger, Hobbes. Read a few "Calvin and Hobbes" comic strips to the children, then ask them if they have any toys or pets they "talk to. Give them a chance to share stories about their secret friends. Then pass out blank storyboards and have the children develop their own comic strips about themselves and these friends."

Next are July 5 events:

July 5, 1811 Venezuela proclaimed its independence from Spain.

July 5, 1865 William Booth founded the East London Revival
Society (Salvation Army).

July 5, 1865 The Secret Service was created by Congress.

July 5, 1892 A. Beard patented the Rotary Engine.

July 5, 1946 The Bikini, designer Louis Read's shocking
new bathing suit, was first modeled.

Book (1) explains in "Bold bathing suits-Invite students to
follow in bikini designer Reard's pen lines by drawing and
coloring their own 21st-century bathing suits."

July 5, 1984 The Statue of Liberty's Torch was removed for repairs.

July 5ths Be Nice to New Jersey Week is also brought out in Book (1) through "State studying-During Be Nice to New Jersey Week, encourage your (children) to read up on the Garden State. Then post a sheet titled "Neat things about New Jersey." Each day, invite students to write down something interesting or unusual they learned about the state."


July 6 is just as interesting beginning with some interesting birthday's:

July 6, 1747 John Paul Jones, Revolutionary War hero often
called "the Father of the U.S. Navy", was born.

July 6, 1866 Beatrix Potter, children's author, was born.

Book (1) talks about her in "Thinking and talking animals-All of the animals in Beatrix Potter's stories have anthropomorphic qualities. Have your (children) look up the word anthropomorphic in the dictionary
Then invite them to tell about times when their pets (or other animals) have appeared to act like humans. Afterward, have the children write and illustrate stories about animals imbued with human qualities."

July 6, 1907 Dorothy Clewes, children's author, was born.

Then we are given the events for July 6:

July 6, 1776 The Declaration of Independence was announced
on the front page of the Pennsylvania Gazette.

Book (1) writes in "A dangerous document?-After reading the Declaration of Independence, some people called it a dangerous document. Ask your (children) why people might have felt this way. Next, ask them to imagine that they were living in 1776. Would they have agreed with the sentiments expressed in the Declaration of Independence or remained loyal to the king? Have them write their reactions in their journals (and possibly share them later.)"

July 6, 1885 Louis Pasteur administered the first successful
antirabies inoculation to a boy who'd been bitten by a rabid dog.

July 6, 1919 A British dirigible became the First Airship to Cross the Atlantic.

July 6, 1933 Babe Ruth hit the First Home Run in an All-Star Game.

Book (1) writes in "Making baseball history-Even before he hit the first home run in an All-Star game, Babe Ruth had made baseball history. During the 1927 season, he hit a record 60 home runs. In 1929, his salary climbed to $80,000 a year--more than the president of the United States earned. When Ruth was criticized for making more than the president, he reportedly quipped, "Why not? After all, I had a better year than he did." Have your (children) discuss what this story tells about American society. Then have them debate this question: Does America reward its sports and entertainment stars with too much money and fame? Encourage the kids to use concrete examples to bolster their arguments."

July 6, 1945 Nicaragua became the First Country to Accept
the United Nations Charter.

July 6, 1954 Elvis Presley made his first record.

July 6, 1989 A study was released that found Dangerously High Cholesterol Levels in one-third of American adults.


July 7 gets very busy with events but it only has a few birthdays as follows:

July 7, 1887 Marc Chagall, Russian-French artist noted for
his dreamlike paintings, was born.

July 7, 1906 Satchel Paige, American baseball pitcher, was born.

July 7, 1940 Ringo Starr, English musician and
member of the Beatles, was born.

Now begin the events:

July 7, 1861 The First Torpedo Attack of the Civil War took place.

July 7, 1923 Warren Harding became the First U.S. President to Visit Alaska.

July 7, 1936 Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind was published.

July 7, 1958 President Dwight Eisenhower signed the Alaska Statehood Bill.

July 7, 1972 NASA announced Plans to Collect Solar Energy to be
used as a power source on earth.

Book (1) writes in "Solar Experiment-Tell your (children) that solar heaters typically consist of a black panel containing tubes through which water circulates. The sun heats the water as it moves through the tues, and the hot water provides heat for buildings or homes. Ask your (children) why the panels are black. (Black absorbs heat.) Then have them conduct this simple experiment. Take two empty, same-size tin cans and paint the outside of one can black. Fill both cans halfway with cold water, then place them outside in the sun. Take the temperature of the water in both cans every 15 minutes. Students will find that the water in the black can becomes warmer faster."

July 7, 1985 German tennis star Boris Becker, age 17, became t
he Youngest player to Win the Wimbledon Singles Championship.

July 7, 1986 Charles Stocks played 711 Holes of Golf in 24 hours.

Book (1) writes in "Par for the course-Have your (children) calculate the average number of holes Charles Stocks played per hour, then round that number to the nearest hundredth. Then ask them to figure this out: If a round of golf consists of 18 holes, how many rounds did he play per hour? How does this number compare with the average number of holes played per hour?"

July 7, 1988 Eleven-year-old Christopher Lee Marshall
began his Flight Across the Atlantic. He followed the
course of his hero, Charles Lindbergh.

July 7 is also the day of other happenings as Tanabat in Japan but Video Games Day in which Book (1) explains in "Video hits-Help your (children) practice concise writing by having them each write just one paragraph to explain their favorite video game. Invite them to share their work with (others)."
It is also Fiesta De San Fermin as Book (1) writes in "Spanish stampede-Each year in July, the city of Pamplona, Spain, honors its patron saint, San Fermin, with an 8-day festival.The highlight of the festival comes when adventurous men run through the cobbled streets to the bullring--pursued by a group of bulls. Have your (children) write a short, humorous poem about the running of the bulls."


July 8 has only three birthdays also as follows:

July 8, 1838 Count Ferdinand Von Zeppelin, German pioneer
in lighter-than-air vehicles and the first builder of dirigibles.

Book (1) writes in "Airships and ads-Tell your (children) that dirigibles are also known as airships, blimps, or zeppelins (in honor of Count von Zeppelin). These vehicles have been used for passenger travel, scientific exploration, and warfare. For example, during World War II, Germany used zeppelins in air raids against Great Britain. Do your (children) know what dirigibles are commonly used for today? (Blimps are often used for advertising.) Ask your (children) to imagine they could advertise their favorite book on a blimp. What would their slogans say? Have the kids write their slogans on construction-paper blimps, then hang the blimps from the ceiling of the (house)."

July 8, 1918 Irwin Hasen, American cartoonist who created the
Green Hornet and the Green Lantern, was born.

Book (1) writes in "Green Hornet spin-offs-To celebrate Irwin Hasen's birthday, invite your (children) to create a cartoon using a colorful insect of their choice as the main character. Students can create either comic strips or a single-box cartoon and use balloons for dialogue."

July 8, 1932 Russell Everett Erickson, children's author, was born.

July 8 has several events as follows:

July 8, 1497 Portuguese navigator Vasco da Gama set sail from
Lisbon. His journey established a Sea Route to India via the
southern tip of Africa.

July 8, 1629 King Phillip IV of Spain sent King Charles I of England a Gift of Five Camels and One Elephant.(Now Grandma would do some things with this one as write about the Elephant and other gifts kings might have given each other.)

July 8, 1776 The Liberty Bell Rang Out in Philadelphia to
announce the adoption of the Declaration of Independence.

July 8, 1776 The Declaration of Independence was Read
to the Public for the First Time at Philadelphia's Independence Square. 

July 8, 1835 The Liberty Bell Cracked while being tolled during the
funeral procession of Supreme Court Justice John Marshall.

July 8, 1911 Nan Jane Aspinwall became the First Woman to
Cross the United States on Horseback. She covered
4,500 miles in 301 days.

Book (1) writes in "A long time in the saddle-To mark the day Nan Jane Aspin wall completed her horseback crossing of the United States, give your (children) some Math problems based on this equine odyssey. If Aspinwall rode 4,500 miles in 301 days, how many miles per day did she average? At the same pace, how long would it have taken her to ride 5,000 miles? How far would she have gone if she had ridden for a full year?"

July 8, 1976 Gerald Ford, who had assumed the presidency upon
the resignation of Richard Nixon, announced his plans to seek reelection.


July 9th has only one birthday:

July 9, 1819 Elias Howe, American inventor of a
lockstitiching sewing machine, was born.

The events are as follows:

July 9, 1755 General Edward Braddock was Fatally Wounded
during an attack in the French and Indian War. His aide,
George Washington, escaped injury.

July 9, 1776 General George Washington summoned his troops
to New York for a Reading of the Declaration of Independence.

July 9, 1816 Argentina declared its independence from Spain.

Book (1) writes in "Where in the world?-Have your (children) find Argentina and Spain on a world map. Then ask: In which hemispheres--and on which continents--are these two countries located? What body of water separates them? What is the capital of each country? How far is it from capital to capital?"

July 9, 1850 President Zachary Taylor Died while in office.

July 9, 1872 The Donut Cutter was patented by J.F. Blondel.

July 9, 1877 America's First Telephone Company,
Bell Telephone Company, was founded.

July 9, 1893 Surgeon Daniel Hale Williams performed the
First Successful Surgical Closure of a Heart Wound.

July 9, 1979 Voyager 2 passed Jupiter, returning photographs and scientific data.

Book (1) writes in "Mother Earth's music-Tell your (children) that Voyager 2 is one of two U.S. space probes that were launched in 1977. (The other probe is Voyager 1.) Besides their scientific instruments, both probes were equipeed with special records called "Sounds of Earth"-- in case of discovery by another civilization. ...make a list of the kinds of sounds your (children) would include on such a record. What would these sounds tell others about the earth and its inhabitants? Are there any particular sounds your students would not want to include? Why?"

July being Picnic Month Book (1) set it up for this day to present the following activity called "Pretend picnic-One day this month, plan an imaginary picnic for the characters in a book your (children) have recently read. Encourage the kids to consider the characters' likely tastes in food, attire, and games. The children may also want to develop a "guest list" including compatible characters from other books. Assemble their ideas into a booklet."
(Grandma suggests planning at least one picnic as a family and doing as much adventuring of the outside as possible. Do as much research as you can of the area you pick.)


July 10 is another full day starting with the following birthdays:

July 10, 1834 James Abbot McNeil Whistler, American painter, was born.

July 10, 1875 Mary McLeod Bethune, American educator, was born.

July 10, 1882 Ima Hogg, American philanthropist, was born.

July 10, 1885 Mary O'hara, children's author, was born.

July 10, 1916 Martin Provensen, children's author and illustrator, was born.

July 10, 1926 Fred Gwynne, actor and children's author, was born.


Book (1) writes in "Playing with words-Besides writing and illustrating children's books, Fred Gwynne is an award-winning stage, film and television actor. (Your (children) may recall on of his TV roles--Herman in "The Munsters.") Gwynne's most popular children's books are those on wordplay. In The King Who Rained, he illustrates the humorous results of using the wrong homophone or homonym. Have students look up the meanings of homophone and homonym. Then ...collect as many homophones or homonyms as possible in a week. At week's end, have the (children) create a silly (illustrations) depicting the literal meaning of (sentences) that misuses (some of these) words. Post the illustrations on (a poster.)"

July 10, 1943 Arthur Ashe, American tennis player, was born.

Now for the events of July 10:

July 10, 1220 London Bridge was damaged by fire and fell down.

July 10, 1853 Vice President Millard Fillmore assumed the
presidency upon the death of Zachary Taylor.

July 10, 1890 Wyoming became the 44th state.

Book (1) says in "What's in Wyoming-Wyoming, the 44th state, may have been among the last states to join the Union, but it has experienced more than its share of firsts. For example, Wyoming is home to our nation's first national park, Yellowstone, and to the first national monument, Devils Tower, Have your (children) locate Wyoming on a map, then find its capital, Cheyenne. In what part of the state is this city located? Next, ask the kids to use compass directions to describe the location of Yellowstone Park and Devils Tower in relation to Cheyenne and in relation to each other."

July 10, 1913 Death Valley, Calif., reached a temperature
of 134º F in the Shade--the highest ever recorded in the United States. 

July 10, 1929 Congress made official the current Size of U.S. Paper Money.

July 10, 1962 Telstar 1, the first satellite to relay TV and
telephone signals, was launched.

July 10, 1973 The Bahamas gained its Independence from Britain.

July 10, 1991 Boris Yeltsin was Inaugurated as president of Russia.


Next is July 11

Birthdays:

July 11, 1767 John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States, was born.

July 11, 1838 John Wanamaker, American merchant, was born.

July 11, 1899 E.B White, American essayist and children's author, was born.

Book (1) says in "Creating characters-Tell your (children) that a dream inspired author E.B. White to create his famous mouse character, Stuart Little. Then ask each child to create an animal character to be born or adopted into the child's own family. Next, have the kids write stories involving the reaction of their new family member to home life. Feature the stories at a (family) read-aloud."

July 11, 1929 James Stevenson, children's author, was born.

Events:

July 11, 1798 The U.S. Marine Corps was created by an act of Congress.

July 11, 1804 Vice President AAron Burr Fatally Wounded
Alexander Hamilton, the former Treasury secretary, in a pistol duel.

July 11, 1892 The U.S. Patent Office decided that J.W. Swan,
not Thomas Edison, was the Inventor of The Electric-Light
Carbon for the incandescent lamp.

July 11, 1934 Franklin Roosevelt became the First
President to go through the Panama Canal.

July 11,1955 The New Air Force Academy was dedicated at
Lowry Air Force Base in Colorado.

July 11, 1975 Chinese archaeologists announced the discovery,
in Shensi Province, of a 2,000-year-old burial mound containing
6,000 Life-Size Clay Statues of Warriors.

July 11, 1977 Kitty O'Neil set a Women's Power Boat Speed Record--275 mph.

July 11, 1984 The U.S. Department of Transportation ruled
that Air Bags or Automatic Seat Belts would be mandatory
on all American-made cars by 1989.

July 11, 1985 Pitcher Nolan Ryan recorded his 4,000th Career Strikeout.

For National Cheer Up the Lonely Day, Book (1) writes under "Only the lonely-Involve your (children) in National Cheer Up the Lonely Day. First, ask them to name individuals or groups of people who may be lonely, such as senior citizens, widows, widowers, disabled people, and hospital patients. Next, have the children brainstorm for ways to cheer these people up. For example, the children might suggest giving flowers or cards to hospital patients, delivering meals to elderly shut-ins, or organizing a sing-along at a local senior citizen enter. (Form) into "Children's cheer Squad," and have each ...select a "mission" from the list of ideas. Enlist ...volunteers (if you can) to help. Your (children) will not only be involved in a worthy project, they'll also derive great pride in being part of a caring community."

Then under World Population Day Book (1) says under "Population study-On World Population Day, have your (children) look up the meaning of the word demography. Then have them conduct a brief demographic study of (children) in their grade level. How many boys and girls are there? What are their ages? What ethnic backgrounds do they represent? Graph the results."

(Grandma is going to have to stop here.She will type some more tomorrow.)









Rest of June for Summer

Posted on September 8, 2014 at 6:22 AM Comments comments (32)
Grandma is ready to finish June's Summer Calendar History as follows:

June 18th Birthdays begin as follows:

June 18, 1942 Roger Ebert, movie critic, was born.

Book (1) gives an activity here called "Picks and pans-Have your (children) discuss the kinds of things critics like Roger Ebert talk about when reviewing a movie--for example, plot development, acting, musical score, originality, humor, suspense. Then have the kids read several movie reviews in the local newspaper. Afterward, show a film and ask each (child) to critique it, either orally or in writing."

June 18, 1942 Paul McCartney, English musician, singer, and songwriter who was a member of the Beatles, was born.

June 18, 1949 Chris Van Allsburg, children's author and illustrator, was born.

The activity Book (1) has for this person is called "Author's special signature-Have your (children) look through Chris Van Allsburg's books to find Fritz, a bull terrier that appears somewhere in most of the author-illustrator's works. Ask your (children) why they think Van Allsburg includes Fritz. (The dog is his personal signature.) In what unique ways can your students personalize their projects? Invite the children to create their own "personal signatures" on 3x5-inch cards, then use these on future writing and art projects."


Now we have the events for the day as follows:

June 18, 1812 Congress Declared War on England, marking the
beginning of the War of 1812.

June 18, 1823 British Soldiers began wearing trousers rather than breeches.

June 18, 1889 William Richardson of Baltimore patented The Baby Carriage.

June 18, 1945 An estimated 1 million people turned out to give returning
World War II general Dwight Eisenhower a hero's welcome in
Washington, D.C.

June 18, 1983 Sally Ride became the First American Woman in Space.

June 18, 1989 Golfer Curtis Strange became the first man in
nearly 40 years to win Back-To-Back U.S. Open Titles.

June 18 is also Dragon Boat Festival day in China and International Picnic Day

Book (1) gives this activity "Foods from around the world-For International Picnic Day, have your (children) create a picnic menu with dishes from around the world. (Children) can work (with you) to select a country, then research its typical foods. If possible, have (them) prepare their chosen dishes and share them with (the family or friends)."


June 19th Birthday's are as follows:

June 19, 1903 Lou Gehrig, American baseball player, was born.

June 19, 1962 Paula Abdul, American singer, was born.

June 19, 1978 Garfield, comic-strip cat, was born.

an activity in Book (1) is called "Cartoon cat-To celebrate Garfield's birthday, give your (children) some background on his beginnings. Garfield's creator was cartoonist Jim Davis, who grew up on a farm with 25 cats. Davis decided to make his famous cartoon cat when he noticed there weren't any feline characters in animal comic strips. Garfield is named after Davis's grandfather. Encourage your (children) to (find) their favorite Garfield cartoons as well as newspaper, magazine, and pet-product pictures of cats. Also tell them to be on the lookout for descriptions of cats in literature, and to copy down ones that strike their fancy. Use the materials to make a "catty" bulletin board (or poster). ( Forever how you see it, Grandma sees Garfield as a grandpa so maybe Davis imitated his grandfather in Garfield also. Some research might answer that question for Grandma.)"

Now Grandma will give the events for June 19 as follows:

June 19, 1586 English Colonists set sail from Roanoke Island
(now part of North Carolina) after failing to establish the first
permanent English colony in America.

June 19, 1787 The members of the Constitutional Convention
decided not to simply amend the Articles of Confederation but
rather to conceive of an entirely New Plan for a National Government.

June 19, 1846 The First Formal Nine Inning Baseball Game was
played between the New York Knickerbockers and the
New Yorks at the Elysian Fields in Hoboken, N.J.

June 19, 1885 The Statue of Liberty arrived in New York Harbor.

June 19, 1910 The First observance of Father's Day took
place in Spokane, Wash.

An activity in Book (1) to go with Fathers Day is called "Honoring fathers-Tell your (children) that the mayor of Spokane, Wash., proclaimed the first Father's Day on the third Sunday in June, 1910. In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge asked that Father's Day be celebrated nationwide, but a presidential proclamation recognizing the day wasn't signed until 1966. A 1972 law made Father's Day a national holiday. If your (children) could name a new holiday, what would it be? Explain that when a member of Congress proposes a new holiday to the House of Representatives, he or she must get a majority of the members (218?) to cosponsor the bill before it can be considered by the appropriate committee. Representatives typically make speeches to generate support for their bills, so invite your (children) to present arguments to the family of their holidays. Take a vote to see which holidays win a majority."

June 19, 1976 The U.S. spacecraft Viking 1 went into orbit around Mars.

June 19, 1989 Federal officials announced the creation of a
30,000-Acre Refuge for the Florida Panther.

June 19 is also the celebration in Louisiana and Texas of the Thirteenth Amendment, which outlawed slavery called "Juneteenth."


Following is June 20th birthdays:

June 20, 1915 Walter Farley, children's author who wrote the
Black Stallion books, was born.

An activity in Book (1) called "Horse lover-As a child, Walter Farley wanted a horse. But his family lived in the city, and he couldn't convince his parents to let him keep a horse in the garage. His uncle--a horse trainer--encouraged him to visit stables and keep notes about his experiences. Farley used his notes years later when he wrote his first book, The Black Stallion. Ask your (children) to name an animal they'd like to own but can't for some reason. Then hae them read at least two books (fiction or nonfiction) about the animal. Whan they've completed their reading, have them write stories in which they, through a fictional character, come to own the animal of their dreams."

June 20,1924 Audie Murphy, actor and soldier who was the most
decorated American war hero in World War II, was born.

The events for June 20th are as follows:

June 20, 1782 The Bald Eagle became the official symbol of the United States.

June 20, 1782 "E Pluribus Unum" became the slogan for the
Great Seal of the United States.

June 20, 1815 Residents of Plymouth, Mass., reported sighting a Sea Serpent.

Book (1) talks about this event in "Reporting on sea serpents- Ask your (children) to discuss how various segments of today's media might cover reports of a sea serpent sighting. Then have the (children) work (together with you) to prepare stories for the different media/ For example, they could develop sensational tabloid features, serious science articles, broadcast news stories, or human interest features."

June 20, 1819 The SS Savannah became the
First American Steamship to Cross the Atlantic.

June 20, 1840 Samuel F.B. Morse received a patent for the Telegraph.

June 20, 1863 West Virginia became the 35th state.

June 20, 1963 The United States and the Soviet Union
agreed to set up a White house-Kremlin Hot Line.

June 20, 1977 The Trans-Alaskan Oil Pipeline opened.

June 20, 1984 The Motion Picture Association of America
instituted the PG-13 Rating, which stated that children
under 13 must be accompanied by an adult.

June 20 is also Midsommar for Sweden; on the summer solstice.

Book (1) has the following to say about Midsommar with the Title "Dancing around the maypole-Tell your (children) that in Sweden, people celebrate midsummer by holding a daylong festival. They decorate houses, buildings, cars, trains, and buses with flowers and birch twigs. In addition, almost all the towns decorate their own maypoles. At night, the residents gather around the maypole to dance. Invite your (children) to decorate (your home or somewhere) to celebrate midsummer. They can even create a maypole from cardboard wrapping-paper tubes. On festival day, let them dance around the maypole to music."


June 21 has only two birthdays as follows:

June 21, 1731 Martha Washington, America's first First Lady.

An activity for Martha's birthday is as follows in "A First Lady's role-Tell your (children) that Martha Washington apparently didn't like the role of First Lady. She complained that it made her feel like a prisoner. Ask your (children) to speculate on why Mrs Washington might have felt restricted as First Lady. How is the current First Lady handling her role? Encourage your (children) to research how contemporary first ladies have approached their jobs--for example, Lady Bird Johnson campaigned to beautify America, Nancy Reagan crusaded against drug abuse, and Barbara Bush promoted literacy. Then ask your (children) what they think is the proper role for a First Lady. Have them debate their ideas."

June 21, 1982 Prince William, son of Prince Charles and
Princess Diana and first in line after Charles for the British throne.

Following are the events for June 21st:

June 21, 1788 New Hampshire became the ninth state.

Book (1) has an activity for New Hampshire in "Border states- Have your (children) find New Hampshire on a U.S. map. What states are located on its eastern, southern, and western borders? What country is located on its northwestern border? What states border your (children's state)?

June 21, 1834 Cyrus H. McCormick was awarded a
patent for the Reaping Machine.

June 21, 1948 The First Long-playing Phonograph Record
was demonstrated by Peter Goldmark. 

June 21, 1961 The First Seawater Conversion Plant
was dedicated, in Freeport, Tex.

June 21, 1963 Bob Hayes ran the Fastest 100-Yard Dash Ever--9.1 seconds.

June 21 1988 The Ruby Slippers from the movie
The Wizard of Oz sold for $165,000 at a movie
memorabilla auction.

June 21, 1991 School 29 in Yonkers became New York's
First School Designated as an Urban Wildlife Sanctuary. 

June 21 is also the beginning of Vagabond Week(thiird week in June) as Book (1) points out in "Wondering ways-Ask Your (children) to share the images conjured up by the word vagabond. Then explain that a vagabond is someone who moves from place to place without a fixed home. Tell them that American poet Vachel Lindsay was known as "the Vagabond Poet" because he wandered throughout the United States, reciting his verse in exchange for food and lodging. Invite your (children) to list the pros and cons of leading a life like Lindsay's Then have them write stories about where they'd go and what they'd do if they lived as vagabonds for a week."

Next we move on to June 22 as follows with the 3 birthdays first:

June 22, 1757 George Vancouver, British explorer for
whom Vancouver, Canada, was named, was born.  

June 22, 1767 Karl Von Humboldt, German naturalist, was born.

June 22, 1906 Anne Morrow Lindbergh, American Poet and essayist, was born.

An activity is listed in Book(1) for Lindbergh's birthday in "Childhood writings-Anne Morrow Lindbergh kept a diary of her thoughts as a 10-year-old. She wrote about what she could see from her favorite spot-the window seat in her room. She continued to write throughout her life, publishing 13 books--some about her aviation adventures with her husband, Charles Lindbergh, others based on her diaries and letters. Ask your (children) to keep a diary for the rest of the month. At the end of the month, survey the (children) to see how many (of them) plan to continue writing in their diary."

Now for the events of June 22:

June 22, 1772 Slavery was Abolished in Great Britain.

June 22, 1846 Adolphe Sax patented the Saxophone.

June 22, 1868 Arkansas was Readmitted to the Union after the Civil War.

June 22, 1870 Congress established the Department of Justice.

June 22, 1910 Zeppelin Air Service began.

June 22, 1939 The First National Waterskiing tournament took place.

June 22, 1944 The G.I. Bill of Rights, providing World War II
veterans with job, housing, and education benefits, was passed.

June 22, 1970 The Voting Age in the United States changed from
21 to 18.

Book (1) has an activity called "Younger voters-In 1970, President Nixon signed a bill lowering the voting age to 18 from 21. Ask your (children) if they've ever voted in an election (for instance, for student council, club, or team leaders). What qualities did they judge the candidates on? Would they consider those same things if they were voting for local, state, or national officials? Ask the kids if they think voting is a right, a privilege, or a duty. Then have them each write a paragraph defending their opinion."


June 22, 1990 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
declared the Northern Spotted Owl a threatened species.

Book (1) says in "Jobs vs. birds?-The decision to list the northern spotted owl as a threatened species meant that thousands of acres of public forests in the Pacific Northwest would be off limits to logging. Environmentalists hailed the move as the only way to save the owl from extinction. Loggers and the timber industry assailed it, saying that it would cost thousands of jobs in an already-depressed region. Organize a (group) debate on the issue of which should take precedence: saving wildlife species or saving jobs. Are the principles absolute, or would the decision depend on the number of jobs affected and the species in question? Is compromise always possible or even desirable?"

June 23rd has three birthdays as follows:

June 23, 1903 George Orwell(real name: Eric Blair),
English novelist, was born.

June 23, 1940 Wilma Rudolph, American track star, was born.

Book (1) says in this activity called "Special champs-Wilma Rudolph roved she was a champion long before winning three gold medals at the 1960 Summer Olympics. When she was 4 years old, polio crippled her left leg, and doctors believed she would never again walk without a brace. But with determination and help from her family, she proved the doctors wrong.
Have your (children) find out about other sports heroes who have overcome difficulties, such as baseball pitchers Jim Abbott (one hand) and Monty Stratton (one Leg), hockey player Bobby Clarke (diabetes), football placekicker Tom Dempsey (handless right arm and only half a right foot), and track star Jackie Joyner-Kersee (asthma)"

June 23, 1948 Clarence Thomas, associate justice of the
U.S. Supreme Court, was born.

Now for the following events of June 23rd:

June 23, 1683 William Penn signed a Treaty of Peace
and Friendship with the Leni-Lenape Indians.

June 23, 1836 A $28 Million Surplus in the U.S. Treasury
was divided among the 26 states.

June 23, 1860 The U.S. Government Printing Office was established.

June 23, 1868 Christopher Latham Sholes received a patent
for an improved Typewriter with a more efficiently arranged
keyboard. The same keyboard arrangement is still in use today.

June 23, 1926 The First National Lip Reading Tournament
took place in Philadelphia, Pa.

June 23, 1961 An international treaty was signed pledging
scientific cooperation on, and peaceful use of Antarctica.

Book (1) gives an activity as follows:
It is called "Water from the bottom of the world-Antarctica, earth's coldest continent, has an area of about 5 1/2 million square miles and is covered by an ice cap that averages more than 1 mile in thickness. About 75% of the fresh water in the entire world is contained in ice and snow on this continent. Some people have suggested towing icebergs from Antarctic waters to other parts of the world to alleviate freshwater shortages. Tell your (children) that in the waters that surround Antarctica, icebergs the size of Connecticut (about 5,000 square miles) often break loose from the ice shelves. Antarctic icebergs to, say, Los Angeles. What strategies could be used to minimize melting in warm waters? Would the need for speed dictate that smaller icebergs be towed rather than larger ones? Or test their ideas with ice cubes and a dishpan of water."

June 23, 1976 Toronto's Canadian National Tower,
The World's Tallest Free-Standing, Self-Supporting
Structure, opened. It's 1,821 feet high.

June 23, 1988 Temperatures in 45 U.S. cities reached 100º For Higher.

June 23 is also National Columnist Day and National Cheeseburger Month.

Book (1) gives the activity called "Cheeseburger campaign-For National Cheeseburger Month, have your (children) create an add campaign promoting this all-American food."


There are four birthdays for June 24th as follows:

June 24, 1771 E.I. Dupont, French-American Industrialist, was born.

June 24, 1916 John Ciardi, poet and children's author, was born.

June 24, 1944 Kathryn Lasky, children's author, was born.

June 24, 1949 Nadine Bernard Westcott, children's author, was born.

Now the events for June 24th are as follows:

June 24, 1497 Italian explorers John and Sebastian Cabot
landed on the Labrador peninsula in northeastern North America.

June 24, 1541 Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto sighted
the Mississippi River.

June 24, 1647 Margaret Brent appeared before the
all-male Maryland Assembly and Demanded Voting Rights.

June 24, 1930 Radar was First Used to detect airplanes.

Following is an activity to do with this called "Acronym names-After telling your (children) what an acronym is, explain that radar stands for "radio detecting and ranging." Your (children) might e familiar with other acronyms: AWOL,NASA, NATO, SWAT, VISTA. scuba. sonar. Challenge the kids to make up acronym phrases from the letters in their first names, your names, or the word June or summer."

June 24, 1947 The sighting of Flying Saucers was
first reported, near Mt. Rainier, Wash.

June 24,  1964 Commercial Picturephone service began.

June 24, 1968 Professional baseball player Jim Northrup
hit Back-to-Back Grand Slam Home Runs.

Book (1) says in "Honoring young heroes-As a 6th grader, John Kevin HIll piloted his own aircraft on a cross-country flight. Have your (children) review newspapers, magazines, and television news shows to find out about other young people who've accomplished great feats, than share their findings with the class. Next, invite the children to survey classmates and students throughout the school about their accomplishments--no matter how modest. Have them design a Hall of Fame bulletin board (or poster) to celebrate these accomplishments."

June 24, 1987 Sixth-grader and pilot John Kevin Hill left
Los Angeles on a 2,400mile, Cross Country Airplane flight.

June 24, 1990 The first Currency for the Newly Reunified Germany was issued.

An activity in Book (1) says in "Currency calculations-Introduce your (children) to the differences among currencies. Yo begin, tell them the value of the German deutsche mark relative to the U.S. dollar. Then have them calculate how many deutsche marks it would take to equal $100 U.S. dollars. ... give each group a supermarket circular. Have (them) select 20 items to buy. Then have them calculate their grocery bills in deutsche marks. For more practice, tell your (children) the relative values of other currencies, such as the British pound, the French franc, the Greek drachma, or the Israeli shekel, and have them calculate their grocery bills in those foreign currencies."


June 25 birthdays are as follows:

June 25, 1929 Eric Carle, children's author and illustrator, was born.

June 25, 1937 Jane Sarnoff, children's author, was born.

Now for the events of June 25th:

June 25, 1630 The Fork was Introduced in America by
John Winthrop, governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.

An activity is used in Book (1) to explain "Table manners-Tell your (children) that when John Winthrop left England to become the Massachusetts Bay Colony's first governor, he took his fork with him. (Even in Europe, travelers packed their forks because most inns didn't provide utensils.) For a while, Governor Winthrop had the only fork in the New World. Have your (children) list advantages and disadvantages of using a fork to eat. Then have (the children) make three lists: foods that are easiest to eat with a fork, foods that are easiest to eat with a spoon, and foods that are easiest to eat with fingers. Ask your students if they've ever eaten with chopsticks. If someone has, set up a demonstration and let your (children) try it."

June 25, 1678 Elena Cornaro of Venice became the First Woman
in the World to Graduate from a University, the University of Padua.

June 25, 1788 Virginia became the 10th state.

June 25, 1876 General George Custer and 225 men from the
7th U.S. Cavalry Regiment under his direct command were
defeated and killed by a force of Sioux and Cheyenne Indians
led by Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, and Gall at the
Battle of Little Bighorn in Montana.

June 25, 1950 The Korean War began.

June 25, 1951 CBS television presented the First Commercial Color Broadcast.

June 25, 1977 Ted St. Martin sank 2,036 Consecutive Free Throws, the most ever.

June 25, 1989 Chinese painter Wang Yani, age 14, became
the Youngest Artist ever to have a One-Person Show at the Smithsonian.

Book (1) gives an activity about Wang Yani in "Youthful painter-While scribbling over one of her father's paintings at age 2 1/2 Wang Yani said, "Daddy, I just want to paint," Her father soon recognized her potential, and by age 4, Yani had had her first show in Shanghai. A few years later, one of her paintings was reproduced on a postage stamp. Her works now number over 10,000. Yani's painting style is called xieyi (pronounced see-air-ee), which means "ideas writing." She mixes ink and pigment to paint her favorite subjects--monkeys, trees, birds, and flowers.
 She often depicts herself as a monkey in her paintings. Ask your (children) to draw the animal they would select to represent themselves, then include it in a picture of themselves doing something they like."

Next is June 26th birthdays as follows:

June 26, 1892 Pearl S. Buck, American novelist, was born.

An activity in Book (1) is called "Mothers near and far-Encourage older (children) to read Pearl S. Buck's The Good Earth. Then have them compare and contrast the character of the Chinese wife and mother with their own mother or grandmother. What values do they share? In what ways do their respective societies influence or dictate their roles?"

June 26, 1914 Mildred Ella "Babe" Didrikson Zaharias,
American athlete, was born.

Book (1) brings out the importance of women in sports throughout "Outstanding women athletes-In honor of Babe Didrikson Zaharias, one of the greatest women athletes in history, have your (children) research other famous female athletes. Then have them make a list of outstanding female athletes ... in their community. Finally, have them design and mail certificates of recognition to these talented competitors."

June 26, 1915 Charlotte Zolotow, children's author, was born.

June 26, 1937 Thomas Locker, children's author and illustrator, was born.

June 26, 1961 Greg Lemond, professional bicycle racer, was born.

Next are the following events for June 26th:

June 26, 1284 According to legend, The Pied Piper of Hamelin
lured the children of the German village to a mountain,
where they all disappeared.

An activity in Book (1) says it this way in "From sad to glad legends-Invite your (children) to write a happy ending to an originally sad legend. Tell them the story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin, who rid the German village of Hamelin of its rats. After he'd completed the task, the villagers refused to pay him the sack of gold they'd offered as a reward. So he lured all their children to a mountain, whee they disappeared. Next, ...(work with the children to) brainstorm for as many happy endings as they can think of. Have them share their ideas with (others). Then ask each (child) to draw or write a happy-ending legend. Compile the students' work into a booklet entitled "The Pied Piper of Hamelin Revisited--A Happy Endings Collection." Use this booklet as a model for transforming other legends."

June 26, 1614 The First Lottery in America was held by the Virginia Company.

June 26, 1844 John Tyler became the First President to Marry While in Office.

June 26, 1870 The World's First Boardwalk was completed in Atlantic City, N.J.

June 26, 1945 The United Nations Charter was signed in
San Francisco by 50 nations.

June 26, 1959 The St. Lawrence Seaway was dedicated.

June 26, 1990 Mary Alice, the First Test-Tube Tiger to Survive, made he debut at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C.

June 26 is also International Day Against Drug Abuse and Book (1) has an activity named "Fighting drug abuse-On International Day Against Drug Abuse, invite a local substance-abuse counselor to share information with your (children). Then have the kids work (with you) to role-play ways they can say no to drugs."

It is also Madagascar Independence Day and Shrimp Festival in (Belgium).

Next the birthdays for June 27th are as follows:

June 27, 1859 Mildred Hill, composer of the song
"Happy Birthday to You", was born.

Given an activity in Book (1) with the title "Making merry melodies-In honor of Mildred Hill--composer of "Happy Birthday to You"--invite your (children) to compose songs for other festive occasions, such as anniversaries, weddings, graduations, and holidays. Younger children can set their lyrics to familiar tunes. Older (children) can try making up music as well as lyrics."

June 27, 1872 Paul Laurence Dunbar, American poet, was born.

June 27, 1880 Helen Keller, American author and lecturer, was born.

Book (1) Discusses how good she was and gives an activity in "Sense-itive insights-Tell your (children) that an illness left Helen Keller deaf and blind when she was 19 months old. Before the illness, she'd been learning how to talk. But afterward, when she could no longer hear words, she lost her ability to speak and became completely cut off from the world. To help your (children) understand the importance of hearing and sight, have (each) write skits and perform them in pantomime. Can you tell what each (child) is portraying? Next, have (each) wear blindfolds as they try to identify items through touch, smell, or (if appropriate) taste."

June 27, 1927 Captain Kangaroo (real name: Bob Keeshan),
American television personality, was born.

June 27, 1949 Lionel Richie, American singer, was born.

Now we are given the events for June 27 as follows:

June 27, 1652 The New World's First Traffic Law was passed
in New Amsterdam, (New York City).

Book (1) has an activity called "Rules of the road-The first traffic law applied to wagons, carts, sleighs, and other horse-drawn vehicles--prohibiting any galloping. Ask your (children) to speculate about why traffic laws were instituted well before the advent of automobiles and superhighways. What kinds of laws do they think might have been needed? Make a (family) list, then encourage the children to illustrate one of the ideas."

June 27, 1922 The First Newberry Medal for excellence in children's
literature was awarded to Henrik Van Leon for the Story of Mankind.

June 27, 1923 Midair Refueling was first accomplished.

June 27, 1978 The First Erasable Ballpoint Pen was patented.

June 27, 1988 Habitat for Humanity Volunteers began building
20 homes in Atlanta, Ga.

June 27 is also Eid Al-Fitr (3-day Islamic celebration of the end of Ramadan)

Next is the birthdays for June 28 as follows:

June 28, 1577 Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish painter, was born.

June 28, 1891 Esther Forbes, children's author, was born.

June 28, 1960 John Elway, professional football quarterback, was born.

Next are the events for the day as follows:

June 28, 1778 Mary Ludwig Hays, better known as Molly Pitcher,
took her wounded husband's place of a cannon at the
Revolutionary War battle of Monmouth, N.J.

An activity to go along with Molly Pitcher is called "Patriotic Pitcher-Mary Ludwig Hays earned the nickname Molly Pitcher by carrying pitchers of water to Continental soldiers on the battlefield. During the Revolutionary War battle of Monmouth, N.J., where her husband was fighting, she displayed rare bravery. When she realized the men were retreating--on orders from General Lee--Hays raced to the cannon where her husband had just fallen, and began firing it. General Washington arrived on the battlefield a short time later and ended the retreat. The next day, Washington gave Hays the rank of sergeant in the Continental Army. Ask your (children) to write newspaper stories chronicling Molly Pitcher's heroics."

June 28, 1859 The First Dog Show was held in New Castle, England.

June 28, 1894 Congress made Labor Day a holiday for
federal employees and the District of Columbia and
established its date as the first Monday in September.

June 28, 1904 Helen Keller graduated with honors from Radcliffe College.

June 28, 1914 Archduke Francis Ferdinand, heir to the
throne of Austria-Hungary, was assassinated by a Serbian
nationalist in Sarajevo. The event precipitated World War I.

June 28, 1919 The Treaty of Versailles was signed, officially ending World War I.

June 28, 1938 Pennsylvania began selling Hard-boiled
Eggs from slot machines throughout the state to help
end an egg surplus.

Book (1) says in an activity saying "Fixing a food glut-Ask your (children) to imagine that their home state had a surplus of peanut butter, grape juice, and pizza. How would they eliminate the surplus? Encourage them to dream up wacky ways of selling or freely distributing the extra food statewide. Then have them illustrate their ideas."

June 28,1990 The TV show "Reading Rainbow" received an
Emmy for the best children's series..

Book (1) gives the activity with the title as "Award-winning Tv shows-Make a (family) list of the qualities found in a good TV program. Based on this list, which three programs would your class nominate for an Emmy award? Write the names of these programs on the chalkboard, (vote for the best one.)

Next is June 29th birthdays as follows:

June 29, 1858 George Washington Goethals, American army
officer and chief engineer of the Panama Canal.

June 29, 1861 William Mayo, American surgeon, was born.

June 29, 1868 George Ellery Hale, American astronomer, was born.

The events for June 29 are as follows:

June 29, 1620 Parliament Prohibited the Growing of
Tobacco in England.

June 29, 1776 The Virginia State Constitution was adopted,
and Patrick Henry was made governor.

June 25, 1880 A young Englishman completed a 1,000-mile walk in 1,000 hours.

Book (1) gives the activity through Book (1) in "Walk this way-Challenge your (children) to calculate the number of meters and kilometers covered by the Englishwoman who walked 1,000 miles in 1,000 miles. On average, how many meters per hour and kilometers per hour did she walk? Have each of your (children) walk a measured times. Have the students calculate the number of hours  it would take them--if they walked continuously--to walk the same distance as the young Englishwoman."

June 28, 1906 Congress established Mesa Verde, National Park
in Colorado. It contains prehistoric  cliff dwellings.

June 28, 1956 Charles Dumas became the First Person to Clear
7 feet in the high jump.

Book (1) gives an activity to go along with called "A 7-fot feat-To help your (children appreciate Charles Dumas's athletic feat, measure 7 feet up on a classroom wall and mark it with masking tape. Next , give each of your students a self-sticking yellow note and have them take turns jumping up and sticking yellow note on the wall. Which student was able to reach the highest: How many kids were able to reach above the 7-foot mark? Remind the children that Dumas got his entire body above 7 feet."

June 29, 1985 Bob Brown of Boston set the yo-yo
Endurance Record at 121 hours 10 minutes.

June 29, 1987 Scientists from the New England Aquarium released
three pilot whales after nursing them back to health.

June 29, 1990 The Chicago White Sox played their last game
at the old Comiskey Park.


June 29 is also Bawming the Thorn Day in England.

Book (1) has a last activity for June 29 called "Trimming the tree-Tell your (children) that in Appleton, England, Bawming the Thorn Day has been celebrated since 1125. On this day, Appleton residents decorate the large hawthorn tree located in the town center with ribbons, flags, and flowers. Afterward, the children of the town dance around the tree. Make a construction-paper hawthorn tree and post it on a (wall), bulletin board, (or poster). Then have the (children) decorate it. Play some background music as the children work. then invite them to dance around the (room) when they're finished."

Last we have the two birthdays for June 30th as follows:

June 30, 1917 Lena Horne, American singer, was born.

June 30, 1940 David McPhail, children's author and illustrator, was born

Book (1) gives the activity "Exploring books- David McPhail's first book was The Bear's Toothache, which was published in 1972. Afterward he wrote or illustrated over 40 books. Gather a collection of McPhail's books for your classroom reading corner. Invite your (children) to compare and contrast McPhail's more recent books with his earlier ones. Make a ... list of similarities and differences among story themes and characters."

Now we can move onto the events for that day in Book (1) starting with the following:

June 30, 1775 Benjamin Franklin was elected U.S. postmaster general.

Book (1) explains in the activity "Friendly postcards-In honor of Ben Franklin's appointment as postmaster general, have your (children) make a large postcard for a friend. Give each child a 4x4-inch plain white card. On one side, have the kids draw and color a picture. On the other side, have them make sections for the address and message. When they finish writing their messages and addressing their postcards, invite the kids to design their own postage stamps. Finally, have them deliver their postcards." 

June 30, 1859 The French tightrope walker Charles Emile Blondin made the First Tightrope Crossing of Niagara Falls.

Book (1) has the activity in "Tricky tightrope walker-Tell your (children) that the Frenchman Charles Emile Blondin crossed Niagara Falls on a tightrope in just 5 minutes. Later, he repeated his feat several times, but always with a twist. For instance, at various times he crossed blindfolded, on stilts, in a sack, and while carrying a man on this back. Have your (children) look up the definition of "daredevil" in the dictionary. Then have them list other people who might be considered daredevils. Their responses might include bungee jumpers, cliff divers, race car drivers, or trapeze artists."

June 30, 1888 Arturo Toscanini, age 19, conducted his first orchestra.

June 30, 1906 The U.S. Pure Food and Drug Act was passed.

June 30, 1908 The Biggest Explosion ever Recorded on earth took
place when a meteor struck a distant part of Siberia.

June 30, 1940 The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was established.

June 30, 1948 Bell laboratories announced the development of
the Transistor as a substitute for radio tubes.

June 30, 1968 Race Car Driver Bobby Unser drove to the top of
Pikes Peak in a record-setting 11 minutes 54.9 seconds in
the 46th running of the Pikes Peak Auto Hill Climb.

June 30, 1985 A New Basketball Hall of Fame opened in Springfield, Mass.


That is all for June folks! Have fun!


Play Ball

Posted on August 29, 2014 at 11:42 PM Comments comments (35)
Grandma is writing when Nebraska will be playing their first football game for the year this weekend. However, she has decided that since much of the work she has given you has been so late at getting there she wants you to understand that much of it can be carried on into September and throughout the year. Whatever it takes to add to the learning. Various sports is one of the lessons Grandma begins with so this could be used as an introductory to that lesson. The history you will receive for the summer months can just be given as that and added to what you have and you can start out again with the beginning of time and move onto each time in history, placing a little bit of the Bible at a time on the line as you cover it.
Grandma has worked very hard to make connection today with the interference of the storms. She kept loosing her wireless router connection today as well as a problem with making InternetInternet connection again. The gal sent out some signals and the rain that had just came down as well as another push on the plug-in to the modem possibly did it finally; after my husband just had to spend $35 on new cords a guy the other day said it might be making part of the problem.
Therefore, Grandma is going to give the rest of the unit in Book (57) on the baseball games she gave some information to you last night from. It is as follows except for the Bibliography I will give you later:

"Take Me Out to the Ball Game!

Whole Group Introductory Activities

Showing a film such as Field of Dreams, The Rookie, Babe, or Rookie of the Year is an excellent way to introduce this unit.(A League of Their Own; which is a movie about women first playing softball or baseball is showing on This ,a movie channel in Omaha, NE, this weekend.) Viewing a televised game, attending a live game, or holding a (group) baseball game are other suitable introductory activities . Before beginning, establish rules for working at the centers and a routine for moving from center to center. (A center is an area of a home or school with each of subjects such as math, social studies, history, language and reading, writing, art, science, and health or physical education. Grandma has area in her home for each of these subjects some are named different things as a work area, Disney area, play House area, Play store, and even another additional area for Media as movies, comedy as jokes, riddles, comics etc. Some things still need some more organization and some things are done at the table still for art, writing, etc.It is getting better and better. Because of my knees I have actually failed to do my gardening totally outside because I cannot stand long at all now, which SSI is not allowing me to call it a disability and want me to go out to a job making phone calls. My husband knows I cannot even do that since I can hardly get about very fast he says. I know I could reach my grandson in danger fast enough a while back though. However, each area can be called simply what it is for either reading, language, social studies, history, writing, art, science, health or physical education even besides the physical games or dances you may preform. Someone stated they felt bowling and golf were not a physical activity. They are very wrong there. I have totally forgotten the teaching of music and that is really one of my favorite subjects to teach and use as a tool for learning. For by the way you can use many things as tools for learning as dolls, decorating rooms, posters, films or making videos, pretending things is even a tool, acting out things or role playing, puppets. Anything you can think to help get the concept through the same as blocks to build with or colored pencils or things drawn on paper; anything to help.) You may wish to set up all centers at the same time and have (the children) rotate through the complete cycle in their cooperative groups, or you may choose to have (the children) complete half the centers and then set up the other half. Another option is to have the (children) complete half the activities in cooperative (work with others) and then allow (the children) to select individually from the remaining activities. You might have students complete some of the activities as individual contracts. (Each unit of topic like baseball to a country to fairy tales might be handled different than even an ongoing subject as all the continents and countries to art and math or an interchange of a play store used as part of math but maybe math in another area or all the individual other areas or centers as well as by itself somewhere. History and the time line might even be handled with only a part of history in an area or an area of study rather than all of it together along with the Bible study on the line as well with many books included for them to read.)

Small Group Activities
Where It All Began

There are several conflicting theories about how baseball began. Some contend it was adapted from cricket.Others state that Abner Doubleday invented the game in Cooperstown, New York, in 1839. (Football grew out of the game we call Soccer, but in Mexico they call Soccer Futbol.) At this center, have students work in cooperative groups to brainstorm possible origins of baseball. Have them select their most original idea and write a myth or legend telling how baseball originated, and then perform a reader's theater version of their story for (others). (Now Grandma might set this up in what she calls the children's work area where they can dress-up to go to work at a desk where there is a pretend computer or real one to use and pretend they are doing it for work then come home to their house area when done and pretend they are working in a restaurant and fixing a meal or go to the store and buy food. Else she may set it up to be done at a play school desk to be done as an assignment in a separate writing area. If she thought of it as a history lesson or social study lesson she may assign it to be done close to those areas. If after a movie she might assign it to be done in another room of the house. This is how it works.)

The Playing Field
Baseball is played on an area divided into an infield of definite measurement and an outfield that varies from ballpark to ballpark. The infield is a square with 90' (27.4 m) sides. The corner farthest from the outfield fence is home plate, and the other bases run counterclockwise. The pitcher's mound is an 18' (5.5 m) circle inclining toward a small rectangular rubber slab in the center. It lies inside the square, 60' 6" (18 m) from home plate. The outfield ends at an outer fence, and its distance from home plate varies with the shape of the field. The fence is usually about 250' to 450' (76 to 137 m) from home plate.
Provide (the children) with the above information, and have them work ...to sketch a blueprint of their "ideal" ballpark (at the work desk as mine, an art table, little school desk, the health, physical education area, reading and language area, math area, history area, newspaper writing area, or the social study area if not where they watched a movie with you.) Have them create a scale model of the park. Encourage (the children) to consider dugouts, dressing rooms, concession booths, parking, washrooms, press box, handicapped accessibility, and anything else that is necessary to their plans. When (the children) have completed their models, have them "sell" their ideas to (you or others).

How Many Miles?
At this center, provide students with the formula for calculating area, perimeter, and circumference. Have them create ballpark problems involving running the bases, outlining the base path, and edging the pitcher's mound. Ask (the children) to include realistic problems in which the calculation of area, perimeter, and circumference is necessary. Have each ...write its problems so that (another person) at the center (if their could be a friend, relative, etc.) can solve them and add problems of their own. When all (children) have completed the practice area, perimeter, volume, circumference, and so on. I would use a separate math area or where the movie or maybe the work area for this unless it was near the history area.)

The Great Baseball Machine

Several machines have been invented to use in ballparks. These are machines that provide easy maintenance of the ballpark, line the field, sell tickets and record sales, provide music and other special effects in the stadium, and assist ball players with their practices. There are even machines that measure the speed of a pitch, computers that record statistics, and pitching machines. (Think of even the things they have in video games now.) At this center, have (the children) brainstorm possible technological advances which might occur in the future of baseball. Have (the children) select their best ideas and draw sketches or create models of them to "sell" to (others).

Let's Hear It for the Team!
At this center provide lists of baseball teams currently in the American and National Leagues. ... Also provide (the children) with a list of Baseball Hall of Famers (which Grandma already provided you with.) Have the (children) reach a consensus on a perfect ball team. Invite (the children) to create their own "dream teams" by selecting members  from any present or past baseball team for each of the nine positions, designated hitter, and coach. Have (the children) share their line-ups with (others as yourself or the person they are learning with), indicating the player in each position. Ask (the children) to justify their choices by using player statistics. Have them name their new teams and create uniforms for the newest additions to the league!

Shoeless Joe
W.P Kinsella is a modern North American writer who has won great acclaim for his tales of baseball in the Midwest. Perhaps the best known of these is Shoeless Joe, from which the movie "Field of Dreams" was adapted. At the center, provide book excerpts and a selection of novels about baseball. Have the (children) read selections and attempt to write their own baseball stories in which local characters are brought to life. (From what I have told you, I will let you decide where the best place for this would be-maybe use it as a homework assignment-to give them plenty of time for it.)

ERAs and RBIs
At this center, provide baseball cards and other sources that identify player statistics. Have the (children) examine the statistics of ten players and create charts or graphs comparing the players. In their presentation to (you or others), have (the children) share why they selected their ten players. Have the (children) create mathematical problems involving average (mean), median, and mode statistics using the information from player cards. Have (the children) submit these problems for later use in mathematics. ... .(This is a third thing that could be used in a math center by itself. They could be given one a day.)

Casey at Bat
At this center, provide students with a copy of "Casey at Bat" and any other appropriate baseball poetry.  Have the (children) use the ideas to create sequels telling what happened to Casey, write their own original baseball ballads, or write prose playscript selections of Casey's batting incident for presentation as plays.

Take Me Out to the Ball Game
At this center, provide a recording of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" or any other baseball songs. Have the (children) create baseball rally songs for their favorite teams and teach them to the (you and others)!
(Now Grandma would do this in her Music area which is also in the living room with much of the reading and Social Studies.)

Baseball Trivia
At this center, provide baseball cards, trivia books (see bibliography), and Trivial Pursuit™ or another trivia game. Have (the children) work cooperatively to create their own baseball trivia cards. Have each (child) at the center read the cards that are already there and add their own original cards to the cooperative ...game. They can use friends or family members to help them with this lesson.

Baseball Bibliography
Have (the children) examine the bibliography provided at the end of this unit. Have them use baseball books, card catalogs, electronic encyclopedias,and other sources to create their own annotated bibliographies with at least twelve books, pamphlets, audio-visual resources, journals, and resource people.Show (the children) a sample style for an annotated bibliography.
(I Grandmother does not or cannot provide you with this Bibliography as she will try wait 'till she can for this or obtain what you can from the library.)

Baseball Hall of Fame Greats
At this center, provide pictures of famous ball players. Have (the children) use pen and ink, charcoal, or paint to create their own portraits of present or future Hall of Fame players. (Guess what center Grandma would use here.)

Cricket/Baseball Controversy
For decades, the controversy has raged over which is the better sport--baseball or cricket. Have the students examine material explaining how each game is played and prepare charts showing similarities and differences between the two sports. Have them consider such things as: rules, cost, equipment, playing fields, officials, number of players, and skills required. Have them prepare a statement defending one of the games as the greater sport and providing supporting reasons for their choice. (A good assignment for your newspapers.)(If you had not finished out your yearbook, it would be a good time to now also.)

I'm Conducting a Survey
At this center, have (the children) prepare questions examining preferences for games watched and games played. Encourage them to include both males and females of different age groups, levels of education, occupations, and socioeconomic levels as they conduct their surveys. Invite (the children) to include as many sports as they wish, but have everyone include baseball as one of the choices. Have (the children) conduct their survey with relatives, neighbors, school friends, and so on. Then have them compile their data individually and (together with others) and analyze the results. Have them prepare charts and graphs to share their data with (you and others).(Maybe this would be best as homework but as part of a math center and the newspaper area.)

Baseball Food(Remember fruits and vegetables are part of June's monthly project and that of food is important in lessons for September.)
For years, hot dogs, soda, and pretzels have been considered ballpark food. Have (the children) brainstorm other foods they could sell at their new ballparks. Have them select and prepare marketing campaigns to "sell" their new ballpark food to (you and others).

The Quiet Hero
Provide biographical information of famous ball players, past and present. Have each (child) select a player and use the "Bio-Poem" format (Grandma is providing below) to create a bio-poem for that player. Have (the children) create pencil sketches of these players to illustrate their poems. Display completed editions of the poems and sketches, then mount them in a book for the (family, friends, and others). (This part even though it has parts of art which could be part of the newspaper or yearbook areas, but Grandma still would probably make it part of the language area. However, language could be part of the newspaper or yearbook area vice versus.)
Bio-Poem Pattern
Line one: Poem title (Person)
Line two: Three adjectives to describe the person.
Line three: A significant accomplishment.
Line four: A detail of early family life.
Line five: An early career/school accomplishment.
Line six: Something for which you will remember this person. The reason you picked (them).
Line seven: A word, phrase, or saying synonymous with this person's name.
                   (Example: The "Say Hey" kid.)

The Great American Pastime
It has been said that baseball is woven into the fiber of American life--that within the game, all the lessons of life can be learned. Have (the children) work (you or friends) to brainstorm the lessons about life that can be learned on the ball field.

Indoor Baseball
Have (the children) consider how baseball could be played in a living room or recreation room (or as a board game or video game) with young children. Have them rewrite the rules and redesign the equipment to adapt the game to the change in setting and age group. Have them demonstrate the new game with a group of primary children in a gym, library, or classroom.

Great Moments in Baseball
Provide biographical materials about Baseball Hall of Famers. Have (the children) select members of the Baseball Hall of Fame listed and what might be added since the time of Book (57) in the 1990's. Have each (child) prepare a one-page biographical sketch of a player's great moment in the sport. The data should include: stats, position played, teams played for, family life, date of birth and death, and any other interesting facts. Have (each child) check their chosen players off the list so that the next (child) does not select the same player. Completed pages may be bound, illustrated, and placed in the (house or a special place).

What Makes a Great Coach?
Have (the children) brainstorm the characteristics of a good coach. When the (children) have made a long list, have each (child) create an extended simile. Provide the following examples: a good coach is like a parent; a good coach is like a guardian angel; a good coach is like a good sandwich. When each (child) has written a simile, have them complete their comparisons using data from their list of characteristics.(Another good project for the newspaper, yearbook, or language center or area. By the way folks the newspaper and yearbook could be a part of the language area or center. Else the language a part of the newspaper and yearbook area or center. Art could be a part of it all also.)

Baseball in a Box
Have (the children) use the rules of baseball to create a baseball board game for 8 to 10 year olds. Have them write the rules and package the game attractively.

Cartoon Capers
Have (the children) examine comic strip sequences of the Charlie Brown baseball series. Have them create their own cartoon characters with baseball as the topic for four-frame comic strips.(use your own judgement here of where to do it)

The San Diego Chicken
Many major  league teams have a mascot. The Toronto Blue Jays have the blue jay, the St. Louis Cardinals have a cardinal, the Detroit Tigers have the tiger, and the San Diego Padres have the famous chicken. Have the students create team mascots for their local or created baseball teams. Then encourage them to design costumes and routines for these mascots. (This gave Grandma a great addition to this unit of using puppets to play out games or act them out themselves.)

Field of Dreams
Artists like Ken Danby have captured the magic of a sport in their art. Invite (the children) to work cooperatively (with you or group of friends, etc.) on a mural that captures the magic of baseball. Before beginning, have (the children) discuss how to represent their ideas in a mural. It would be helpful to provide pictures relating to baseball at this center. This mural can be on paper, a poster, or a wall if wish.

Whole Group Concluding Activities
The main purpose of the concluding activities is to share the products of the various centers and to celebrate the learning that has taken place. Any or all of the following activities would constitute a fitting finale for this unit.
  • Share products of the centers through displays, presentations, newspaper coverage, an open house, an assembly, and so on.
  • Go to a live ball game.
  • Have "Baseball Day" in which each (child) wears team apparel, has baseball food for lunch, sings baseball songs, and plays a school baseball game or tournament.
  • View a film, such as The Rookie, Field of Dreams, Babe, or Rookie of the Year.


Non-Fiction Bibliography
Angel, R. Once More Around the Park, 1991.
Allen, E. Baseball: Play and Strategy, (3rd ed.), 1983.
Appeal, M. and Goldblatt, B. Baseball's Best: The Hall of Fame Gallery, (rev. ed.), 1989.
______, Baseball Encyclopedia, (6th ed.), 1985.
Child, M. How to Play Baseball, 1951.
Einstein, C. The Pitcher's Story, 1967.
Honig, D. When the Grass Was Real, 1975.
James, B. Historical Baseball Abstract, (rev.ed.), 1988.
___, The Baseball Book, 1990.
Kahn, R. Good Enough to Dream, 1985.
Laird, A. W. Ranking Baseball's Elite: An Analysis Derived from Player Statistics 1893-1987,1990.
Levine, P. Spalding and the Rise of Baseball: The Promise of the American Sport, 1985.
Mantle, M. The Quality of Courage, 1964.
Mays, W. My Secrets of Playing Baseball, 1967.
Petersen, R. Only the Ball Was White, 1985.
Reichler, J. The Baseball Encyclopedia. (6th ed.), 1985.
Ritter, L. The Glory of Their Times, 1984.
Robertson, J. OK! OK! Blue Jays, 1983.
Seymour, H. Baseball: The Early Years, 1960.
____, Baseball: The Golden Age, 1971.
____, Baseball: The People's Games, 1991.
Smith, R. World Series: The Game and the Players, 1967.


Fiction Bibliography
Archibald, J. Bonus Kid, 1959.
____, Shortstop on Wheels, 1962.
Brossman, J. Pennant Race, 1962.
Gelner, S. Baseball Bonus Kid, 1961.
Jackson, C. Hillbilly Pitcher, 1956.
Kinsella, W. P. Shoeless Joe, 1982.
____, Box Socials, 1989.
____, The Iowa Baseball Confederacy, 1979.
____, The Dixon Cornbelt League, 1992.
Porter, M. Winning Pitcher, 1960.
Russell, P. Going, Going, Gone, 1967.
Scholefield, E. Tiger Rookie, 1966.
Scholtz, J. Base Burglar, 1955.
____, Center Fielder Jinx. 1961.
Tunis, J. Highpockets, 1948.
____, Keystone Kids, 1945.
____, Rookie of the Year, 1944.
____, The Kid from Tompkinsville, 1940.
____, World Series, 1941.
____, Wells, B. Five Yard Fuller of the New York Giants, 1967.
Wallop, D. The Year of the Yankees' Pennant, 1964.
Zanger, J. Baseball Spark Plug, 1963.

last part of Fishes

Posted on August 28, 2014 at 1:37 AM Comments comments (29)
Grandma had this started last week upon returning from Mexico and her computer system did not want to cooperate. I was set up for a repairman from Hughes Net on September 8th. They called me Monday and said they were coming this Wednesday. What a relief, I was setting up for the library again. The repairman worked in the afternoon and then I called the Hughes Net technicians again and they decided it may also mean it was a bad connection wire which after some signals from him and a switch on wires it began to pick up Internet. I can finally finish the summer work for you. I looked back and classes for my homeschooling did not start till September 8 and the Unit in Book (57) on Oceans would be good to start the lessons again this fall. I will be checking my lessons this year, adding material, and making corrections. I will also add any product I can and work with more people that might help us carry further.
Grandma will finish the unit in Book (57) right now and move back into Book (1) for more Calendar History Line material and activities for June covering Clowns in Book (57). Then Grandma will move into Book (1) with July Calendar History for the Line covering a unit of the Universe in Book (57) and the Calendar History of August. I will work very hard with some long days. The Unit on Oceans in Book (57) should tie us right into the next learning year of Home Schooling.
I will also be giving that book list soon and the material I want to give you from Patricia Gallagher. There are four more activity pages in the Unit on Fishes in Book (57) as follows:
 
"Something Fishy
 
Some fish have interesting names. Choose one of the fish below. On a separate piece of paper, draw a picture of an imaginary fish that fits the name. Below the picture, draw a fictional account describing the creature's features and habits. Then do some research on the fish you've chosen. On a second piece of paper, draw a picture of what the fish really looks like. Below the picture, write factual information about it. Display the papers side by side, or make a booklet by putting your contributions together with those of your (family). Have a contest to design a cover for this unusual "Picture Fishionary." (Some of these fish may have a seperation in the name from the part of the word "fish" to find them.)
 
clown fish                 oarfish                   filefish                  crocodile fish                  hatchet fish
flashlight fish             needle fish             trumpet fish          turkey fish                      batfish
cookie cutter shark    balloonfish            lantern fish            boxfish                           sailfish
hammerhead shark    goosefish              dogfish                 catfish                            sea horse
porcupine fish            sawfish                 jewel fish              stonefish                         lionfish
squirrel fish                butterfly fish          angelfish               tiger shark                      striped drum
parrot fish                  nurse shark           pipefish                 guitarfish                        carpet shark
 
Coral Challenge
 
                                                                                                              Yes              No
Coral formations are made up of many tiny       brain                                     G                P
animals called Coral polyps. Most of a coral     beadlet                                  U                R
formation is made up of the skeletons of          star                                       E                O
these creatures, but the outside of the             staghorn                                A                S
formation is covered with living coral polyps.     goosefoot                               N                T
The polyps have tentacles that are used to
poison small creatures and then push them     whelk                                     C                B
through the mouth into the stomach. Since      elkhorn                                   A                L
each coral formation can be made up of           organ-pipe                               R               A
millions of polyps, it is staggering to think of    Venus's flower basket              M               R
the number of creatures it would take to form   snakelocks                             O                I
a reef more than 1200 miles long. Such a        abalone                                  A                E
reef does exist. To find out the name of this     lettuce                                    R                S
reef, look at the creatures listed. If the
creature is a kind of coral, circle the letter        flower                                      R                H
under the "yes" column. If it is not a kind         crown-of-thorns                        O                E
of coral, circle the letter under the "no"            mushroom                               E                L
column. You will have to use reference            crumb-of-bread                         L                F
materials and maybe even guess at some
of the answers, but keep working on this         What is the mystery place? ___________________
activity until you get an answer that makes
sense.
 
 
 
 
(second page)
 
 
 
Fishy Crafts
 
Balloonfish: Blow up a balloon of any size and shape desired. Tape on paper fins, eyes, etc. Add details with markers. Try changing another balloon into a sea creature other than a fish.
 
Stonefish: Paint a smooth, clean stone to look like the body of any fish desired. Glue on additional
paper parts if desired.
 
Cookie cutter shark: Use cookie cutters shaped like sharks of other sea creatures to make animals from modeling clay or dough.
 
Jewel fish: Mix 1/2 cup flour, 1/4 cup salt, and 1/6 cup water together in a bowl. Knead the dough with your hands. Add a little flour if the mixture is too sticky or a little water if the mixture is too dry. Then
use the dough to mold a shark medallion, sea horse necklace, clown fish charm, etc. Be sure to poke holes in jewelry to which you will add string or cord when dry. (Grandma suggests adding jewels to it if you wish. The picture shows it looking like a shaped piece of diamond or cut jewel. I suggest trying some food coloring if you wish.)
 
Boxfish: Cut a fish shape out of a piece of paper. Place a dab of tempera paint on the inside corners of a box lid. Put your fish shape in the center of the box lid. Place a marble in the box lid and tilt the box lid back and forth so the marble moves around and paints a design on your fish.
 
(pictures on these two pages are as follows: The first page has a scene of coral a fish, star fish, sponge, and a sea anemone on the bottom of the sea; the second page shows pictures of the jewel fish, balloon fish, a needle fish, a guitar fish, and a saw fish. The rest of the second page follows:)
 
Underwater Scene
 
The sea is filled with colorful sponges, sea anemones, corals, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and sea lilies. In places where they are found, the sea bottom looks like a beautiful underwater garden. The flower-like appearance of these individuals, however, is deceiving. Though many have names like Venus's flower basket and rose coral, they are not plants. They are animals.
Make a diorama of an underwater scene, or better yet, transform your (learning area or home) into an undersea world. Use crepe-paper streamers for seaweed, inverted paper cups with thin strips of tissue paper for sea anemones, and painted paper sea creatures hanging from the ceiling. Add some seashells, clay snails, and starfish to the floor in areas where they won't be stepped on. Be sure to display some of the activity sheets and projects from this unit.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Following is page 3 of the rest of the end of the unit:)
 
 
 
 
Vocabulary of the Sea
 
Use any reference materials available to help you complete this activity. Color the spaces according to the color code.
 
        fish-yellow                  mammals-green        mollusks-blue         all others-red
 
walrus             
humpback
whale
sea otter
flounder
lobster
sea
urchin
bottlenose
dolphin
halibut
clown
fish
swallower
coral
angler
dugong
manatee
narwhal
grunion
shrimp
sea
anemone
sole
hammerhead
shark
sea lion
whale
shark
barnacle
sturgeon
death
 puffer
sea
horse
clam
barracuda
snail
 
killer
whale
seal
harbor
porpoise
stonefish
Portuguese
man-of-war
 
turtle
starfish
tuna
mussel
moray
eel
conch
sponge
 
snapper
oyster
cockle
limpet
 
sailfish
bass
abalone
stingray
squid
 
 
jellyfish
manta
ray
sea slug
octopus
scallop
  
 
 
  1. Make up as many words as you can from the letters in stonefish. Then choose any of the animals above and make up as many words as you can from its name. Have a contest to see whose choice yields the most words.
  2. Make rebus puzzles out of five of the creatures above. Give them to other (friends) to solve. Your puzzles can use clues that look like parts of the answer or they can yield the exact spelling. Some examples are given. (It shows rebus puzzles as different small pictures of things with plus or  minus signs in between giving the names of the pictures together to form a name. For instance they used a bottle, plus a nose, plus a doll, plus an arrow showing the fin of a fish to make the word bottlenose dolphin; then they used a corn on the cob, plus a chain minus rain to make the word conch.)
  3. List the mammals in alphabetical order. As a super challenge, list all the creatures in alphabetical order.
  4. Scramble the letters in ten of the words. Exchange your ten words with those of a classmate. Without looking at the words given in the chart, unscramble as many of the exchanged words as you can in ten minutes. Score one point for each correctly-spelled word. The winner is the one with the most points.
  5. Cut out the squares in the chart and place them in a fish bowl or other container. Play this game with one other player. Without looking, choose a square. Read the creature's name to the other player. If he or she can spell it correctly, the player may keep the square. If he or she cannot spell it correctly, the player may look at the correct spelling, then put the square back into the bowl. Take turns choosing words for one another to spell. The winner is the one with the most word squares at the end of ten minutes or when the container is empty.
  6. Choose five of the creatures in the chart. Write sentences with words beginning with the letter in the creature's name. These can serve as a mnemonic device for helping you to remember how to spell the words.
 
 
 
 
 
(Following is the fourth and last activity page of the fish unit:)
 
 
 
 
 
Math and More Creature Feature
 
Solve the problems to fill in some of the blanks. Use the following words to fill in the other blanks: sea wasp, coelacanth, giant squid, megamouth, narwhal, sunstar, and sea otter.
 
  1. The ___________________wraps itself in kelp to keep from floating away while it naps. It likes to eat mollusks and cracks them open by banging them against a stone which it rests on its chest. Hunted for its fur, it became extremely rare at one time. An international agreement  in ___________________(784 + 849 + 278), however, helped to save this creature from extinction. (Extra: Make a list of water creatures that are endangered. Write a report about one of them.)
  2. The __________________is a jellyfish with ________________(225 + 15) tentacles, each of which may be more than __________(2 x 3 x 5) feet in length. Its sting is almost always  lethal to humans. (Extra: This creature's name is misleading. The horseshoe crab, the sea spider, the cuttlefish, and the crab-eater seal also have misleading names. Find out why their names do not correctly describe them. Then make a list of other misleading sea creatures' names.)
  3. Oceanographers first learned of the existence of the shark called _______________________in _______________________(892 + 196 + 888) when it was caught by accident and hauled aboard a US Navy vessel. The inside of its mouth glows in the dark, possibly to attract the small animals it feeds upon. (Extra: Pretend you are a newscaster. Give a one-minute account of the discovery.)
  4. Scientists thought the __________________had been extinct for more than___________________(12 x 5) million years until one was caught off the coast of South Africa in ____________________(2020 - 82). (Extra: Write a headline and newspaper article about this catch.)
  5. With a diameter of ________(104 + 63 + 203) cm, the eye of the _______________is the largest of any animal. In comparison, a human eye is only about _____(24 ÷ 8) cm in diameter. The creature can be _________(10 x 5)feet in total length and can weigh _________(36 ÷ 18) tons. (Extra: Find out interesting facts about the eyes of the following: octopus, flounder, and horseshoe crab.)
  6. Of all the whales, the _______________can be found the farthest north. This whale has only _________________(301 - 299) teeth. In the male, one of the teeth pierces the upper lip and grows outward to form a tusk that reaches a length of about ______________(72 ÷ 8) feet. (... brainstorm a list of possible uses for the tusk.)
  7. Many people think starfish, or sea stars, always have __________________(60 ÷ 12) arms, but the number of arms varies among different species and sometimes even among individuals in a species. A ______________________ for example, may have _____________________(2 x 2 x 2) to ___________________________(600 - 587) arms. When a starfish loses an arm, it can grow a new one as long as its central disk is still intact. (Extra: Show friends and relatives a picture of a basket start and ask them what it is. Share some of the funniest guesses ... .)
 
 
 
(that's it till tomorrow folks--thanks for your patience)

Summer Introduction

Posted on July 13, 2014 at 1:17 AM Comments comments (42)
Dear Folks:
     Here are the beginning of the summer lessons I promised you. I am sorry it has taken me so long to get them started. I am having my share of problems this summer. Grandma is at the point she felt you better be told straight that she feels the public schools would have been better to have left the classes running later into June and start after Labor Day. She feels these kinds of things are easier on the children. That it does not make sense and makes things stressful. She also feels it is easier on the parents. Therefore, she is going to be giving her lessons in that pattern. We will run these summer classes till the 1st of September and she will make sure her winter or fall classes start that way or do.
She will also still be giving you her books and finish Patricia Gallagher's helpful hints. I will also have an additional topic of etiquette to cover this summer also. I want to give more ideas on real estate and decorating also. I will also give the rest of the calendar history and famous people (7 to 8 days at a time). I hope you have started to review or started before July the American History, at least the revolution by starting the time line again, for the 4th of July. Else you may want to start it now.
I will be on vacation in August so you may not be able to reach Grandma during that time. I am sorry.
Grandma is also trying to get into more products. As I mentioned before I am always open for suggestions. I hope to get some more things going.
Learning for the summer should evolve around the Earth elements of Water, Air, and Land. Be sure to involve words, letters(for younger children), math with objects, crosswords, mazes, etc.Involve reading and researching, writing, art, and physical activity. Explain the elements of the Earth to the children and what can be in each. Then learn about each as the Air: What it is made of and what is effecting it right now as pollutants or bad chemicals. Learn how it effects our land and ourselves. Cover the same with the Land. Learn how it all effects the Land. Work into the plants and animals of the land including the insects and plants. Talk about what is in it. Talk about what is happening to our insects. Research about Monsanto, GMO;s pollutants, and organic planting. Flowers and other plants, forests, etc. Then learn about the water, animals and plants in it also. Learn about safety in the water, in our homes, and out and about.
Review the history through the time line and collect the rest Grandma will be providing. Decorate a room and learn measurements. Cooking teaches a lot.
Learn how to start sewing by first learning the tools used, materials, and parts of the machine. Practice by sewing two strips of material together.
Learn how to do rag rugs, sew pot holders together, aprons, curtains, pillow cases, quilts, doll clothes, covers for tables, and bibs.
Plant plants if you do not have a garden already. Plant seeds in pots. Beans and cantaloupe grow fast and work well for starters.
Have fun and enjoy what there is for summer. Grandma will try to give all she can. Must go for tonight. I will give more tomorrow night.

Day 167

Posted on May 22, 2014 at 1:05 AM Comments comments (11)
Hello Folks! Grandma has two last books on South America to cover with you. The second one has Arpilleras to make and I obtained a film about them. So link to Arpilleras Information and make one yourself if you wish.
 
The first book to read is called LLama and the Great Flood: A Folktale From Peru by Ellen Alexander,New York: Thomas Y Crowell, 1989 about the country Peru.
"Summary:
The llama warns his master of a forthcoming flood and saves the family by taking them to a high peak in the Andes Mountains.
 
Activities
  1. Find out more about the llama. List at least five ways this animal is useful to the Indians who live in the Andes Mountains.
  2. The Inca Indians, as pictured in the book, produced beautiful crafts. Most of these crafts were used in their day-to-day life. Make an example of an Inca craft and tell how the Incas would have used it.(Cardboard looms can be used for weaving.)
  3. The Andes Mountains are the longest chain of mountains above sea level in the world. They include many land forms, natural resources, and animals. Travel through the mountains is often difficult. Research one of the following topics as it relates to the Andes and write a short paragraph. Make a ... booklet about the Andes Mountains.
                               a. glaciers
                               b. lakes
                               c. rivers
                               d. natural resources
                               e. types of transportation
                               f. alpaca
                               g. chinchilla
                               h. condor
                               i. huemul
                               j. llama
 4.   The Incas tied colorful yarn containing special herbs to the ears of the llama. They believed that
       this would keep the animal healthy and protect its owner. Although there is no written record of
       this, perhaps the ties were also used for identification. List animals on which we place markings of
       identification. Describe the methods used to mark the animals.
  5.   Read more Indians of Peru. Compare them to their ancestors.
 
 
The next story is about Arpilleras which I have given you a link up above, but Book (6) that this story came out of showed a simple Arpillera with a quilted felt tree and stump with leaves and a puffed flower are made for it. You can do this simple Arpilleras if you wish or you can do any of the ones the film shows.The book is called Tonight is Carnaval by Arthur Dorros (Dutton Children's Books, 1991, 24 pp.)
 
This upbeat book, about a Peruvian child anxiously awaiting Carnaval, is warmly illustrated with a series of folk-art quilts known as arpilleras. The story line introduces young readers to a slice of life in the Andes Mountains. An overview of a typically difficult work day is softened by the optimism of the colorful arpilleras--and by the promise of the Carnaval celebration to come!
 
Before Reading Tonight is Carnaval
  • Locate Peru on a topographical map. Help the children notice that much of Peru is located in the Andes Mountains. Use an encyclopedia to share pictures of Peru and the Andes with the class. Tell the (children) that they are going to hear a story that tells of a typical day for the Peruvians who live in the mountains-and of a special celebration that the people are looking forward to.
 
After Reading Tonight is Carnaval
  • Ask the children to describe, in their own words, what life in the Andes must be like. Explain that Carnaval is one of the few celebrations that these hard-working people take part in. Ask the children if any of them would trade their lives for the way of life described in the story. Do the (children)believe that the people of Peru would want to change places with them? Why or why not? (Remind (the children) that, despite the amount of work he is expected to do, the young narrator of the book does not sound unhappy about his life.)
 
Follow-up Activities
Appreciate Arpilleras
The quilts known as arpilleras, which are used to illustrate Carnaval, help readers understand the Peruvian way of life by offering a look at a popular regional folk-art form. Have children look at the photographs of the arpillera-makers quilting the wall-hangings together. Have them notice the modest workroom where the quilters are working, as well as the photograph of the woman working with her baby slung on her back. Read the photo captions to the class. Then, take a second look at each of the arpilleras used to illustrate the book. List all of the elements in each of the illustrations that tell us a bit about life in Peru (e.g., type of animals, work, instruments, terrain, vehicles, plants, etc.). Remind the children that any art form draws from the experience of the artists. Since arpilleras are popular decorating items, it may be possible to locate a real arpillera to share with the (children). (Try borrowing one from a parent, a colleague, or a local shop).
 
Explore Folk Instruments
The narrator of the book looks forward to playing his quena (a reed flute) in the Carnaval band. ...(See if you can obtain a visit somewhere to see such instruments as a reed instrument, a wind instrument and a percussion instrument). Why do the children believe the folk instruments of Peru are made of different materials than the instruments we are most familiar with? Your local record store may be able to help you select recordings of traditional Peruvian music you can (listen to).
 
Till tomorrow-Grandma is going to bed.

Day 162

Posted on May 19, 2014 at 11:56 PM Comments comments (32)
Another Day! Grandma is going to give you lessons out of Grandma's book(4) for a Book called The Gift of the Sacred Day by Paul Gable (Macmillan 1980).
 
"Summary: This is a legendary telling of how the nomadic buffalo-hunters of the Great Plains acquired horses. According to the legend, the people were suffering because they couldn't travel fast enough to hunt down the buffalo herds, on which they depended for food. They had only dogs to pull their travoises, and in times of drought and famine even the dogs gave out. A young boy, determined to help his people, travels to a lonely place, prays to the Great Spirit, and has a visionary dream in which "sacred dogs" (actually horses) of great speed and strength come to his people's aid. The dream comes true. The people give thanks and promise to take good care of the horses forever.
 
Preparation:
  1. Point out the Great plains region on a United States map. Explain that millions of buffalo used to live in the region and that Native Americans depended on them as a source of food.
  2. As (the children) discuss the cover, explain that "sacred" means "holy," or "something to be respected." Suggest that (the children) listen to find out why a horse is called a sacred dog.
 
As you Read
Guide comprehension by discussing why the people in the story at first think that horses are a kind of larger, swifter dog. Invite (the children) to complete a Venn diagram that shows the differences and likenesses."( A Venn Diagram is two circle connecting the Likenesses or connections between two things or ideas with each of the differences on the other two sides of the middle inside each of the circles.) Below shows the results of the answers.without the circles around connected around them.
 
                    Dogs                                                                       Horses
 
               Eat meat                                                                    Eat plants
               Cannot pull                                                                 Can pull
                 heavy loads                                                                 heavy loads
               Don't run                       Likenesses                            
                 as fast                                                                      Run swiftly
                 as horses                     Four legs
                                                   Are mammals
               smaller than                   Can be tamed                         very big
                 horses and                    by people                              whinny,
                 eat less                         and directed                           neighs
                Has more                       Dedicated                              Takes time to
                litter to eat                                                                   train more.
 
"To help students respond to the young hero's adventure, invite volunteers to tell about times they have tried to help their friends or family What special things did they decide to do? What was difficult and what was rewarding about their undertaking? In the story, what difficult things does the boy experience? (he goes off on his own; he has a scary dream) What is his reward? (knowing that his people can now hunt the buffalo).
As you read the last pages of the story, suggest that students listen and look at the illustrations to find clues about how the people in the story feel about Earth's resources and how they act as a result."
 
Extending Geography Skills:
Animal Resources
Invite the children to research ways in which other animals besides the dogs and horses contribute to our world. "Malamutes in the North still do pull loads for people." A cat saved a boy from a dog shown on the news the other day. Some ideas are reptiles, spiders, snakes in the garden,oxen,monkeys, rats and mice, cats, cattle, sheep, deer, rabbits, birds, praying mantis, Bees, wasps, and butterflies,bats, elephants,  etc.You can keep recording this information in the collection of animals you have now as you think of things.
 
"Making Connections
 
Literature:
Being a Story Character  Invite students to imagine that they are one of the following story characters and to tell about the hero from that character's point of view: a dog who must pull a travois; a buffalo-dancer; the magic rider in the boy's dream; a "sacred dog," a buffalo. Students can write and illustrate their responses, or work with a small group to make a tape recording in which the different characters speak. After the finished products have been shared with (you or some people) discuss how the boy's actions affect different characters in different ways. What might have happened if the boy had not taken on the responsibility of helping his people? Invite volunteers to tell how carrying out a chore or another responsibility of their own affects the total environment.
 
Science:
Caring for Animals  Review how the boy's people felt responsible for the animals and plants around them. Discuss the idea of stewardship with the (children); the concept that because human beings are powerful enough to change the environment in radical ways, they are also responsible for taking care of the plants and animals in that environment. If possible, organize a field trip to a nature center local wildlife and how young people can help fill these needs. Examples are building bird nesting boxes; designing, making, and maintaining bird feeders, working with a local environmental group to green-up an area with wildlife plantings to provide food and shelter for small animals. Invite interested students to form groups to plan and carry out one of these or another stewardship project. Encourage groups to give up-date reports to (you) and then to describe their progress and what they are learning."
 
Creative Writing:
Poems of Praise (Grandma is changing this a little--for she want you to write about some special animals in your heart and what makes them so special. These can be displayed when they are finished.)
 
There is two activity sheets that can be done. One is a picture of a herd of horses you and write at least three things to be thankful for. It can be cut out and placed on cardboard to hang somewhere.
The other sheet has tickets with various animals on it and you can put how each of these animals are helpful to mankind and they can be traded with friends or family members.
It is 10:30 at night and Grandma can't keep going I will have to finish early before I go to the doctors and get back to enter more information to you. It was just so demanding today for Grandma.
 
 
 

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