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Ants as Insects

Posted on September 2, 2014 at 3:25 AM Comments comments (43)
Grandma is making this section separate because there was quite a bit on the Insect part and there is quite a bit here. The part on ants is as follows:


                            " Those Amazing Ants! by Becky Daniel and Jo Jo Cavalline

Did you know that there are more than 10,000 different kinds of ants?

I may be hard to believe, but some ants can lift more than fifty times their own weight.
How much do you weigh? Multiply your weight by fifty. Think of something that weighs about the same as fifty times your weight. Draw a picture of this object.
If you were built like an ant, you could pick up that heavy object. put it above your head, and run with it. Amazing, isn't it?
Draw a cartoon of yourself lifting the object that is fifty times your weight.

Ants have a keen sense of smell and can find food my following a scent trail.
You, too, can follow a scent trail. Using an old bottle of perfume, have (someone) make a scent trail by dripping perfume on (something above the ground level ). Blindfolded, and on your hands and knees, try to reach the end of the trail by using your sense of smell.

Ants have compound eyes. Compound eyes allow them to precisely determine the angle of the sun's rays. This awareness of the sun's angle allows ants to navigate over unknown territory and return with food to their nest.
Draw a map of the way (to your home). Be sure to show north, south, east, and west. Could someone unfamiliar with your neighborhood use your map to find your house? How do compass directions help humans find their way?
Why do you think ants don't venture out at night to search for food?

Some ants milk an insect called an aphid, much like a farmer milks a cow. The ants stroke the bug's sides gently and wait for the sweet honeydew to appear.
Draw a cartoon of an ant milking an aphid.

The nurse ants care for the ant eggs. They watch the eggs from the egg stage, through the larve stage, until the young ants emerge. Some larvae can signal the nurse ants when they need them. When new ants leave the nest to search for food they sometimes get lost. Older workers will find these lost ants and carry them back to the nest.
Make a list of babies that are dependent on their mothers at birth. Make another list of babies that do not need their mothers when they are born.

Some ants raise mushrooms inside their nests. The ants cut and carry leaves to the nest to provide fertile soil for their mushrooms. Have you ever tasted a raw mushroom?

                            Mushroom Dip
1 package cream cheese                  1 Tablespoon minced green onion
1/2 cup sour cream                           1/4 pound finely chopped mushrooms
1 teaspoon salt

Mix together and chill. Serve with corn chips or crackers.

Some ants make slaves of other ants. They attack and steal young ants from other hives, take them back to their own hives, and make them do all their work.
Write a story that tells how you would feel if you were kidnapped and made to be a slave. Tell about how you might escape your captors.

Ants have suits of "armor" on the outside of their bodies, rather than skeletons.
Draw a picture of what you might look like if your skeleton was on the outside of your skin. Or, make a list of other animals that wear their skeletons on the outside.

Soldier ants are stationed at the entrance to the nest. They guard the nest and keep enemies away. These ants are larger than the workers. Cover a bulletin board with brown butcher paper. Draw an ant colony. You may want to include:
  • interlocking tunnels
  • soldier ants at the entrance
  • nurse ants attending the eggs
  • ants working in their mushroom garden
  • ants milking aphids
  • harvest ants making bread
  • slave ants
  • the queen ant


Ant Crafts

(On one page is a drawn big ant to put a paper face, hands, and shoes on.)

The Easter ant can arrive the day before vacation and leave a treat for all your (children). Treats are made from (a) small ant pattern. A black jelly bean is attached by a thumbtack to the body of the ant. Use tape to fasten them to (children's') clothes. Have fun with your ant treats. Try balancing them on your head or shoulder as you play dead ant. If they fall off, you are out. Let this ant become your pet ant. You then assume total responsibility for your ant. It must be with you at all times. If you leave your ant to wander, it becomes public property. Any other (person) gets to claim it and add it to their pet collection. Finders keepers, loosers weepers.

Halloween is a great time for ant masks. Be a hungry ant and make a fork and spoon to carry in each hand. Several (people) together may enjoy doing an ant play with their ant masks.

Have you been a good ant or a naughty ant? Because Anta Claus is coming to town. Make a Christmas list of an ant. Make Mr. and Mrs. Anta Claus.

Many more ideas will flow as you enter antland. It can so easily be applied to many different subject areas. Save all these ideas and new ones for another time!


                               Finding the Antswers to Questiants

All species of ants belong to the formicidae family. Using the basic ant pattern, invite each child to make his or her own ant and label or identify all its parts.

Questiant:Where do ants live?
Antswer: In colonies, the thirteen original perhaps.
Ants are social insects because they live together in "colonies." Using the thirteen original colonies, start a nation of ants. Draw the shape of the colony and the citizens of Massachusants, Rhode Islants, Pennsylvaniants, and so on. Draw a crown on the antennae of the governor of each state.

Questiant: What should do you do with an ant? Squish it?
Antswer: No, collect ants and study their personality. If you should find they need some, give them some of yours.
To collect ants, use a piece of white paper, plastic bottles with lids, and a piece of cardboard. Search outdoors under rocks for ant colonies. You will see many of the little harmless black and gray ants running around under rocks. Lay a bottle on its side and use the cardboard to guide the ants in. Scoop up some soil and spread it out on white paper. If you see an ant larger than the other ants, it is probably the queen. Take some extra soil with you in another bottle. You will need it for the ants' new home.
To build an ant nest, you will need a wide-mouthed glass jar; an empty tall, thin can; a sponge; black paper; and rubber bands. Place the can inside the jar. Pour the ants" soil between the two. Wet the sponge and place it across the top of the can. Place the ants on the soil and secure the lid. Wrap the jar with black paper and secure with rubber bands.

Questiant: Why the black paper?
Antswer: Ants like the dark and will build their tunnels close to the glass if it is dark there.
Place your jar in a shallow pan of water on a piece of wood. Place it in a warm place away from direct sunlight. Feed the ants with bread crumbs, bits of meat, drops of honey, sugar, and dead insects. After a few days, remove the black paper and find the antswers to any questiants you might have.
  1. What do the ants do?
  2. How do they communicate with each other?
  3. Do they know it is feeding time? Why?
  4. Why do they build tunnels?
(the bottom of this page shows to cartoon ants talking to each other)

During your observations be sure to sing the rhyming songs: "The Ants Go Marching One by One, Hurrah, Hurrah!"

"Our Antcestor"
Trace the basic ant pattern on black paper and cut it out. You may want to enlarge the pattern. Using scraps of paper, yarn, tissue paper, and whatever materials are available, dress your ant appropriately for your particular antcestor. If you are teaching social studies, make Abraham Lincant, George Washingtant, Benjamin Franklant, Ant Betsy Ross, Florence Nightantgale, and so on.

"Our Antimals"
Draw the face of an animal or cut out a picture from a magazine. Trace and cut out the basic ant pattern. Paste the animal face to the ant body. You may discover stegosaurant or Leo the liant. Put all your animals behind bars and display on a (wall) zoo.

"Dead Ant"
Choose two (children) to be the killer ants. They are "it." The chosen killer ants try to tag the other (children). The only way the (children) can be safe from them is to "freeze" with their antennae (arms) up in the air and say "dead ant." When a killer ant tags someone who wasn't fast enough to be a dead ant, that ant is captured and taken off to the ant prison (which is a certain spot in the room).


Activities
  • Declare National Ant Day: Take your ant to lunch and buy her a "MacAnt Sandwich."
  • Michael Jacksant, famous recording ant, is in dire need of material for his songs. Help him write a song and give it a hit title. This new hit could become your "family anthem."
  • Write tongue twisters incorporating the word "ant" in regular words: Indianta Jones is awfully antsome.
  • Write a recipe for "ant soup."
  • Write a conversation between two ants.
  • Pretend you are an ant that somehow got caught in a marching parade. How will you ever get out alive?
  • Make a board game to play with an ant theme.



(This next page has five jars that lists words of parts of the sentences: Nouns, Verbs, Pronouns, Adjectives, Adverbs

Directions:
Write the bold word in the correct jar.

One pretty day in the month of May
My friends and I went out to play.
We walked so slowly to the park;
There children laugh and puppies bark.
Hot dogs were toasting on the grill,
We smelled them as we climbed the hill.
The table setting by the stream
Was sure to be any picnicker's dream.
We found some cakes, salads, chips, pies,
They looked so glorious to our hungry eyes.
I discovered the chef asleep on a stool,
The grown-ups and kids took a swim in the pool.
We climbed on the table and just took a bite,
But one led to another, then oh! What a sight!
We ate such a feast, crumbs fell to the ground.
Not one of us noticed the approaching sound
Of the chef coming swiftly, his feet doing a dance,
The look on his face when he saw us--Black Ants!
We looked like an army, so quickly retreating,
Our bellies were full after all of that eating.
We marched to our colony, burrowed inside,
Until the next picnic--we'll stay here and hide.

(There are a list for eight Nouns; eight Verbs; six Pronouns; eight Adjectives; and seven Adverbs--maybe you can make more.

                                           "Ant"onyms

Read each sentence below. In the blank write the opposite of the word you see in parentheses.

  1. The bus left (early)___________________________for the school picnic.
  2. It was the (last)_______________________time we had gone to Holly Park.
  3. The children were (sad)___________________about going.
  4. (Few)_________________________boys and girls were singing songs.
  5. This was going to be a (short)_________________bus ride.
  6. Most of the seats on the bus were (empty)________________________.
  7. (None)______________of the children were glad it was Saturday.
  8. When the bus stopped, it was time to get (on)_____________________.
  9. The children (walked)______________to the picnic tables to eat.
  10. They ate their lunches (slowly)____________________.
  11. Ants crawled on the table where the (grown-ups)_________________ate.
  12. (Girls)_____________began to throw Frisbees.
  13. One girl tried to (throw)______________________it.
  14. (Before)____________________ they ate, it was time for a visit to the zoo.
  15. Most of the animals were (inside)_____________________________.
  16. The monkeys were the (quietest)________________________of all the animals.
  17. Later the kids (sold)________________________souvenirs.
  18. Several boys got on the (right)__________________bus.
  19. It was (morning)_____________________ when the children go back to school.
  20. The sky was beginning to get (light)___________________.

Circle the word in each row that is the opposite of the first word.

  1. messy                          sloppy, neat, dirty
  2. soft                               mushy, weak, hard
  3. pretty                            ugly, beautiful, lovely
  4. old                                worn, used, new
  5. smooth                          level, rough, flat
 

Insects lesson

Posted on September 2, 2014 at 1:14 AM Comments comments (40)
Grandma is giving you a lesson for Insects from Book (57). There is something I want parents to understand. While you are starting your children with a new year of lessons, the public schools are having to test their children to see what level of learning they are at during this time. That gives you one advantage.

The Unit on Insects is as follows:

                                    "Bub Bonanza by Mary Ellen Switzer

Introduction
Turn your (children) into excited young entomologists with this motivating array of insect activities. (Grandma has one book that invites children to belong to what they call a bug club, there is also in another what they call a plant club. At the end of this insect unit in book (57) are awards for insect collecting and doing. Take advantage of awards any time you can because kids really love them as much as they love little stickers.) They will be "buzzing" with excitement as they plan an insect trivia game, use "Bug-a-Rama Drama" script starters to create plays, and work on the Bug Bonanza activity page. (Another important activity for children to do is collect all kinds of bugs, spiders, butterflies, flies, ants, etc.; This time of year they are abundant because they have had all summer to develop. It is a great time to do some fishing and hunt for big worms after a rain.Save insects in plastic cover with netted covers or jars for a short time and then released.)

The Bug Jar Trivia Game
Send your (children) on an insect "trivia hunt" to help make a (family) trivia game. They may use encyclopedias and other reference books to research their information.
Divide your class into small teams and ask each group to write questions (with answers) on 3" x 5" cards on their assigned subject. Suggested categories include ants, butterflies, bees, crickets, grasshoppers, flies, and beetles. Have a brainstorming session with your (family and friends) to add more to the list.
Place the completed trivia question cards in a large glass jar labeled "The Bug Jar," and play a round or two during those extra minutes of the day.
To further extend this activity, trivia teams can write mini reports on their assigned insects to be presented to the (family and friends). Suggestions include making poster reports (with pictures and facts), creating a television game show or news program that features insects facts, and an imaginary interview with an entomologist.

Fabulous Fables
It's fable time! Read students some of Aesop's delightful fables that feature insect characters. Suggestions are "The Grasshopper and the Ant," "The Ant and the Dove," and "The Fox and the Cicada." Next have the children write and illustrate their own fables using insects as main characters.
Celebrate at the end of this project by having an "Aesop's Fable Party." Have your children read their fables to the class. Serve animal cookies, since so many of Aesop's characters were animals!

Mother Goose Fun
Read the familiar "Little Miss Muffet" Mother Goose rhyme to your (children). Ask the (children) to create a comic strip about the rhyme from the spider's point of view. (This is a good introductory unit to Mother Goose but Grandma usually likes to use it in the month of May because of everything starting with the letter M for May. However, Grandma likes to use the story of the Moose eating a cookie and the Mouse eating something else Grandma can't remember because of the mice at Christmas time, cookies for Halloween, forest stories in the fall because of the harvests and changing of the trees. They all seem to fit that way for Grandma thought of learning. You have to plan things comfortably for yourselves. If you did cover the Mother Goose rhymes in the spring or for last year, this definitely fills the position as a review and with the introduction of comics as well as the restart of the newspaper.)

Invention Fun
Be an inventor! Create a new state-of-the-art and farm. Label the parts of your new ant farm. Draw your design on another sheet of paper. Tell the world about your invention. Write an advertisement about the ant farm. (Use another insect if you wish.)

Let's Write a Story
Write a story about a bug. Here are some story starter ideas:
Hello, my name is Gary Grasshopper. My life as a grasshopper is very exciting! Let me tell you about one of my days...
One warm summer day, a curious ant named Andy decided to visit a picnic. It turned into an adventure that he would never forget! here's what happened...

Bug-a-Rama Drama
Delight your (children) with these motivating script-writing activities. ...give each ...a script starter. Ask each...to create a script, practice it, and then share their skits with (you and/or others).

Amazing Insects
Setting: television newsroom
Characters: Announcer and any number of reporters
Script-Starter: Announcer: "Welcome to our program Amazing Insects. Our reporters are here today with some interesting information on insects. Here's our first reporter with some great information." (Reporters 1, 2, 3, etc., give their reports on various insects.) (Puppets can be use or dolls in place of other reporters only your child or children are do the talking. )

The Unhappy Ladybug
Setting: grassy meadow
Characters: Laura Ladybug, Buzzy Bee, Cassie Cricket, Andy Ant, Bernie Butterfly, and any number of insect characters
Plot: Laura Ladybug sits sadly under a mushroom. It's her birthday today, and all her friends have forgotten. Write a script telling how her friends come to the rescue to make it a happy birthday she'll never forget.

The Case of the Missing Caterpillar
Setting: office of Sam E. Spider, Detective
Characters: Detective Sam E Spider, his helper Florence Fly, C. H. Caterpillar, Charlie Butterfly, and any number of insect suspects
Plot: Detective Sam E. Spider needs your help. C.H. Caterpillar has been missing for two days, and everyone is worried. Write a script telling what happened to C.H.

Fred E. Firefly Saves the Day
Setting: grassy field
Characters: Fred E. Firefly, Betty Butterfly, and any number of insect characters
Plot:One rainy day a Monarch butterfly named Betty got separated from her family. They searched all day with the help of their insect friends but couldn't find Betty anywhere. It was getting dark--what could they do now? Write a script about how Fred E. Firefly comes to their aid.

Insect Book Nook
Dorros, Arthur, Ant Cities, New York: Harper & Row, 1987
Johnson, Sylvia Water Insects. Minneapolis, Lerner Publications Co., 1989
Mound, Laurence. Insect Eyewitness Books, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1990
Parker, Nancy Winslow, and Wright, Joan Richards. Bugs. New York: Greenwillow Books, 1987.
Parker, Steve. Insects Eyewitness Explorers. New York: Dorling Kindersley, Inc., 1992.
Porter, Keith. Discovering Crickets and Grasshoppers. New York: The Bookwright Press, 1986.
---. Discovering Butterflies and Moths. New York: Gloucester Press, 1987.
Petty, Kate. Bees and Wasps. New York: Gloucester Press, 1987.
Pringle, Laurence. The Golden Book of Insects and Spiders. Racine, Wisconsin: Western Publishing Co., 1990.
Still, John. Amazing Beetles Eyewitness Juniors. New York: Alfred A. Knopt, 1991.
Watts, Barrie. Keeping Minibeasts: Ladybugs. New York: Franklin Watts, 1990.





                                                           Bug Bonanza Trivia

Attention all Junior entomologists! Grab your pencils and test your knowledge of the insect world.

_________________________1.   Name the three parts of an insect.

_________________________2.   How many legs does an insect have?

_________________________3.   The legs and wings are attached to what part of the insect?

_________________________4.   Beware! This insect "attacks"  wood.

_________________________5.   True or false. Insects live long lives.

_________________________6.   What do ladybugs like to eat?

_________________________7.    Name the insect that looks like a twig.

_________________________8.    How many legs does a spider have?

_________________________9.    Are insects cold-blooded animals?

________________________10.   What is the hard outer covering of an insect called?

________________________11.   What is the larva of a butterfly called?

________________________12.   Watch out! These bugs give off a bad odor when disturbed.

________________________13.   What insects are sometimes called "armored tanks" of the bug
                                                  world?
________________________14.   Ants live in groups called ____________________________.

________________________15.   True or False. There are over a million species of insects.

________________________16.   Name the heaviest insect.

________________________17.   Are insects vertebrates or invertebrates?

________________________18.   Bees make honey from _____________________________.

________________________19.   These beetles can shoot a hot liquid from their abdomens.

________________________20. What is the longest insect?







                                           Bug Bonanza Activity Sheet

Attention kids! Get your paper, pencils, and crayons ready and let's begin! We hope you enjoy the activities below__ all about insects.

  1. What is your favorite insect? Tell why.
  2. Draw and label the parts of an insect. Remember the three body parts--head, thorax, and abdomen. Then add six legs, antennae, and wings.
  3. Make a list of all the ways insects can help us.
  4. Extra! Extra! Read all about it! Your trip to the tropical rain forest was a big success! You have discovered a new insect. Write a newspaper article to tell the world about your discovery. Remember to include the five Ws: Who? What? Where? When? and Why? Think of a catchy headline for your story.
  5. Design a bookmark for your favorite insect book character.
  6. Make a list of all the insects you can think of. Make a game, such as a word scramble list or word search. You may also use words pertaining to insects, such as body parts.
  7. Be a reporter! Create a one-page newspaper called "The Grasshopper Gazette." Write news articles and stories about grasshoppers. Include pictures with your articles or stories. Use an encyclopedia or reference book to find out more about grasshoppers.
  8. Write a riddle about any insect. You should have at least three clues written in complete sentences. Try to stump a friend!
  9. How many words can you make using the letters in "praying mantis"?
  10. Be a butterfly detective. Look up information about butterflies in a reference book. Cut out a big shape and include at least one picture in your report.

Circle (and draw) an insect on this page for every activity you complete."




                                     "Butterflies by Florence Rives

Objective: This unit proposes to enlighten us about the beauty and worth of the butterfly by developing an increased appreciation and awareness of the part that butterflies play in the world.

  1. Why are butterflies called butterflies? What are some legends and theories about this?
  2. Describe a butterfly's wings.
  3. Why do you suppose many butterflies are spoken of as "winged flowers?"
  4. Explain what caterpillars are.
  5. How can you tell butterflies from moths?
  6. What are the body parts of a butterfly or any other true insect called?
  7. Write a short paragraph explaining how the butterfly uses its antennae.
  8. 8. What are butterfly wings made of?
  9. What are the purposes of the scents which the butterfly gives off?
  10. List the four stages of life through which the butterfly and the moth go. Draw a sketch of each stage.
  11. Explain what a compound eye is.
  12. List some of the enemies of butterflies. How are butterflies and caterpillars equipped to escape their enemies?
  13. What is molting? How many times does a caterpillar molt before it becomes an adult butterfly?
  14. How long do some butterflies live?
  15. About how many kinds or groups of butterflies are known by scientists?
  16. Describe the butterfly's proboscis. How does the butterfly use it? Write two sentences about it.
  17. Find out about camouflage, or protective coloration, of the butterfly and moth.
  18. What can you find out about the "eyespots" on a butterfly's wings? Why are they there? How do the eyespots help the butterfly?
  19. What do butterflies feed upon? What do caterpillars feed upon? Why do you suppose certain butterflies and caterpillars prefer to eat certain foods?
  20. How do butterflies help people?
  21. Define metamorphosis.
  22. Find out about the migration of certain butterflies. Why do they do this?
  23. How is a "brush-footed" butterfly different from other butterflies?
  24. What United States butterfly is the largest?
  25. If you wanted to have a butterfly haven in your yard, what are some of the plants you would grow?
  26. Research in depth one or two of the following. Write a paper to share with your classmates.
          a.   Tiger Swallowtail                                     b.   Monarch
          c.   Common Sulphur                                    d.   Painted Lady
          e.   Giant Swallowtail                                    f.    Viceroy
          g.   Red Admiral                                           h.   other
    27.  Why do you think some butterflies may be on the endangered list? Discuss.


Things to Do and Think About
  1. Use a large magnifying glass to examine caterpillars when you find them. Do the same for any chrysalis you find.
  2. Go to a museum where collections of butterflies are kept to see different kinds, body and wing markings, etc.
  3. Enjoy looking at many pictures of butterflies in books, magazines, filmstrips, or wherever you find them. By studying their pictures you will be more apt to identify them when you see the real ones. You might also carefully observe the caterpillar pictures in order to match or associate them with the butterflies they will become.
  4. Sketch a butterfly to show its body parts. Label each part.
  5. Use butterflies as motifs to design wallpaper, a bedspread, a bathroom curtain, etc. Select the colors to blend with those of the butterflies.
  6. Selma, Alabama, has been declared the butterfly capital of the state. This was achieved by the efforts of a group of garden clubs, beautification and tourism councils, and Girl and Boy Scouts. It was a conservation effort. In 1985 the Alabama Senate designated April 16 as the annual "Save the Butterfly Day" in Alabama. What do you suppose you might do to have your state and/or city declared a butterfly haven?
  7. Make a set of flashcards using pictures of butterflies. Write the names of butterflies on the back of each card. Study the pictures, and then have a flashcard contest with a (friend or parent).
  8. Sketch and color a desk-size butterfly on cardboard. Cut it into ten or twelve pieces to make a puzzle. See if your (friends or family) can put the puzzle together.
  9. Make a short crossword puzzle with words you have learned during your study of butterflies.
  10. As a (family), choose a favorite butterfly and form a (group) to make a butterfly flag for your (home) or (somewhere).
  11. Select a late spring or early summer month and make a butterfly calendar for that month. Decorate the date squares with colorful butterflies. Make the calendar big enough to be seen easily from the back of the room.
  12. Compile all of your accumulated pictures, clippings, sketches, notes, writings,etc. into a (family) booklet. Add drawings, stories, lists, puzzles, and poems."

References
Bring, Ruth Butterflies Are Beautiful. Minneapolis: Lerner, 1984.
Brouillette, Jeanne S. Butterflies. Chicago: Follett, 1961.
Fischer, Heiderose and Andreas Nagel. Life of the Butterfly, Minneapolis: Carolrhoda Books, Inc., 1987.
Mitchell, Robert T. and Herbert Zim. A Golden Guide to Butterflies and Moths. New York: Golden Press, 1964.
National Wildlife Federation. National Wildlife. Vienna, VA. Aug./Sept. 1988: pp. 4-11.
Porter, Keith. Discovering Butterflies and Moths. New York: The Bookwrite Press, 1986.
Sammis, Kathy. Butterflies. New York: MacMillan Co., 1965.

Zoos

Posted on August 31, 2014 at 9:28 PM Comments comments (47)
Grandma left off in Book (57) when she came upon an event of June 15 about Congress creating the National Zoological Park in 1889. Grandma felt it was best to introduce some Units in Book (57) as part of the lessons. She gave you some information about a couple of National Parks which she will finish in November. Then she will now cover a Unit in Book (57) on Zoos which will tie to the animal study we started which she will end with another animal Unit from Book (57) that will end the year studies. Next she will cover Insects study for the summer and on into September.
Grandma will also do some more of June's Calendar History for the time line, cover circus's, do some of the July Calendar History and go into study about space before she finishes July and gives you August. All these will tie into the studies for September. Now for the following:

"Zoos by Liz Hagner

Which Continent Does the Animal Live ON?
Zoos often display animals according to the continents on which the animals live--Africa, South America, North America, Europe, Asia, Antarctica, or Australia. They may use regions of the world too, such as the rain forest or the Arctic.
When you visit the zoo, notice which continents various animals come from. Does your zoo specialize in any one geographical area? Use reference books to study the species that live in each area of the world. Remember that continents are large areas. The animals of northern Canada are not the same ones that live in southern Florida.

Activities
  1. As a class activity, attach a world map in the center of a bulletin board. Place photos or drawings of animals around the edges of the bulletin board and draw a line to the continents on which they live.
  2. Choose the animals of one continent to research. Work with (each other) or (others) that have chosen the same continent (or want to work with the child.) Make a bulletin board display (or a poster) of your continent and its animals. Find information about the animals and write a report about them. Place the report and a photo or drawing of the animals on the bulletin board (or poster) or you might want to make a booklet about them instead.
  3. With your continent group, make one card for each of the major animals of your continent. On one side of the card, write the name of the continent on which the animal lives. On the other side, place a drawing or photo and a few facts about the animal. Be sure to include its particular habitat--rain forest, desert, and so on. Join with class groups studying other continents and shuffle your cards together. Divide the class into teams to identify the continent that matches each animal card displayed.
  4. Make a bulletin board parade of the animals of your continent. Arrange photos of them from the smallest to the largest. You might choose only the mammals, the birds, the snakes, or the butterflies. Perhaps you can do this in the hallway of your school.

Getting Started on Research
  1. One of the best places to start is with an encyclopedia (The computer usually holds a free one.) This will provide you with an overview of all the animals. You might look up Animals, Mammals, Australia, Africa, Americas, Arctic, Antarctica, Asia, Europe, North America, South America, or Zoos.
  2. Use a reference book written specifically about animals. Libraries have a variety of these.
  3. Look through magazines such as National Geographic, National Geographic World, International Wildlife, National Wildlife, Audubon, or Ranger Rick for ideas.

Choosing One Animal to Study
  1. When you have decided on a particular animal to study, use the card catalog or computer in your library. This will direct you to books on your animal or to books that include more than one animal. You may also need to look under headings, such as Animals, Mammals, or Reptiles. What Dewey Decimal System call numbers do you find that most nonfiction animal books have?
  2. Ask your librarian for help in using the Reader's Guide to Periodical Literature. Check the guide to find magazine articles about your animal.
  3. Don't overlook fiction books about your animal. Most animal fiction stories contain a great deal of information about animals.
  4. If a zoo is nearby, visit it to study your animal. Often zoos and museums have special books about their animals.
  5. What information will you include?
           a. Introduction
               Think: Who, what when, where, why, and how. (These are the 6 basic questions all
               scientists ask about everything.)Tell your reader the basics about the animal--what
               it looks like, where it lives, its most interesting characteristics.
           b. Physical appearance: Provide details.
           c. Habitat: This is vitally important in these days of diminishing habitat. Which continent?
               Which part of that continent? What specific requirements does the animal have for its 
               home.
           d. What does it eat?
           e. Who are its enemies? How does it defend itself?
           f. Reproduction: How does it raise its young?
           g. Status: Endangered? Threatened?
           h. What is special about the animal?
     6.   How will you present your information?
           a. Read, take notes, and write a report in your own works.
           b. Make some drawings. No one is expecting perfection. Certainly you can show stripes
               versus spots! You can probably draw a bear's head so it looks like either a polar bear 
               or a black bear. Observe, then draw. (We have been doing a lot of tracing ourselves in
               Mexico.) Collect some photographs, if possible.
            c. Make a bulletin board display (or poster).
            d. Dress up as your animal.
            e. Give an oral report to (others).
             f. Present your report to a younger (group of children or older).

Similar, But Different
Think about doing a report about animals that are similar, but different. You'd plan your research just the way you would for one animal, but you'd be presenting a report on more than one animal with the emphasis on comparing the animals. Here are some suggestions:
  1. rhea, ostrich, emu, cassowary
  2. porcupine, hedgehog
  3. Bactrian camel, Dromedary camel
  4. Indian rhinoceros, African rhinoceros
  5. Asian elephant, African elephant
  6. Alligator, crocodile

All in the Family
You might choose one family of animals to study: primates (a huge subject--enough for (a big class), reptiles--or break that one down into snakes, lizards, turtles, and so on.
Perhaps you'd like to pick just one group, such as bears, deer, rabbits, big cats, monkeys, sheep, or cranes. For example, list the bears that live on a specific continent. What continents do bears not live on? Can you draw pictures or find photographs of them? What kinds of displays or enclosures would be necessary in a zoo? Are they endangered or threatened? What special breeding programs exist for them in zoos?

Study an Animal That is Different
Everyone knows what an elephant, giraffe, and kangaroo look like, but what about these?

South America: coati, tapir, cavy, capybara, yapok, vicuna, guanaco, alpaca

Africa: aoudad, okapi, serval, gnu, aardvark, eland, fennec, ibis, gazelle

Australia: dugong, cuscus, Tasmanian devil, wombat, bandicoot, echidna, emu, super glider, dingo

Asia: karakul, yak, mongoose, oryx, tarsier, anoa, gaur

Choose one animal to report on. When you visit the zoo, see if the zoo has that animal in its collection. Describe what the animal looks like. Is it similar to a more familiar animal? Where does it live? What does it eat? What interesting facts can you discover about it? Can you make a poster or a bulletin board?

Special Research Projects
  1. Look in magazines for the latest news on zoos, endangered species, or reintroduction into the wild. Use Audubon, Ranger Rick, Zoo Books, National Wildlife, International Wildlife, Science News, and others. Ask your librarian for help in using the Reader's Guide to Periodic Literature, looking up subjects such as Zoos, Animals, and Endangered Species to locate articles in magazines.
  2. Read about the black-footed ferret. What happened to it? What are zoos and other organizations doing to keep the ferret from becoming extinct?
  3. Read about the California condor and efforts by the Los Angeles Zoo to save it from extinction and return it to the wild.
  4. Read about the owl in western forests and the debate between conservationists and the lumbering industry on the west coast. Again, use the Reader's Guide and a newspaper index.
  5. You, your family, or( a group you learn with) might want to join a large zoo in order to receive their publications about their own animals, animals of other zoos, and endangered species. Some zoo memberships allow free visits  to zoos across the country, as well as their own zoos. (Don't forget to utilize your family newspaper with information you find.) Report to the (group) on the cost of a membership and the zoo's publications. You might consider the San Diego Zoo, the Bronx Zoo, the Brookfield Zoo, the Cincinnati Zoo, or others. Does your library subscribe to Zoo Books, a publication of the San Diego Zoo? 
  6. Read the Just So Stories of Rudyard Kipling to find out how the elephant got its trunk and other tales. You might want to read one aloud to a (group).
  7. Present a report to a kindergarten or first grade class ...(maybe even a preschool or old folks home) about children's zoos (or and animal in a zoo). Have plenty of drawings and photographs. Include information about the animals that are usually housed in a children's zoo, What baby animals might be there, special exhibits (such as the plastic bubbles for viewing prairie dogs at the Roger Williams Zoo in Providence, Rhode Island), what animals the children could pet, and local children's zoo so you can tell the children about the layout. Are there special educational demonstrations for the children? Consider assisting the kindergarten class with a visit to the zoo.
  8. Make a zoo map for your (home). You might enlarge the map of a zoo your (family) has visited, or you could design a map of your own imaginary zoo. Be sure to tell what continents and types of regions are represented, where the demonstrations are held, and so on.
  9. Do you think you live in the middle of nowhere? Is there no zoo anywhere near you? Well, not every animal lives in a zoo, you know. What other opportunities for seeing animals are available to you? Find out where the nearest National Wildlife Refuge is located. What kind of animals or birds does it protect? Is there a visitor center? Falcon Press, a publisher in Montana, markets books describing where to view the wildlife of Montana and other states. See if your state offices provide a similar publication. Do you live near a national park where you might see wildlife? Does your state have a state fish hatchery? Find out when you can visit. Some states have built fish ladders next to dams so fish can get upstream to spawn. What about aquariums?
  10.  Are you a photographer? Plan to take photographs on your zoo visit.
  11. Would you like to go on a safari to Kenya? How far away is Kenya? How much would it cost to fly there? Check with a travel agent for that figure and to find out the cost of various safaris. What animals would you see there?
  12. Do a report on zoo exhibits. Include the various "cageless" exhibits, such as moats; temperature barriers; oneway glass enclosures; safari-type areas; planting of real trees and bushes, both native and exotic; fake trees and rocks; horticultural exhibits; indoor exhibits; special butterfly and bird exhibits; and nocturnal exhibits.
  13. Research zoo careers--zoologists, veterinarians, keepers, educational personnel, groundskeepers and landscapers, administrators, and food-preparation workers. What other zoo careers are there?
  14. Find out about volunteer opportunities at a zoo near you. How old do you have to be to volunteer? What volunteer programs does your zoo have for teenagers? What are docents? In what ways do you think volunteers could help at a zoo?
  15. Find out about "Adopt an Animal" programs at various zoos. You might want to do this with another (group of people). How could your (family) earn money to adopt a zoo animal? What benefits, besides the obvious one of contributing money to the zoo, do these programs offer?
  16. Investigate special educational programs at a zoo near you. Besides school visits, look into after-school programs, weekend workshops for students and families, and school vacation and summer zoo camps.
  17. Watch the special animal programs on television. Borrow videotapes about animals from your library.

Creative Writing Ideas
  1. Write a mystery about an animal tat disappears from the zoo. Include a school class, their teacher, a parent, a circus performer, a mayor from another city, and anyone else you need as characters in your mystery.
  2. Write a fantasy about a hippopotamus who thought he was a kangaroo.
  3. Write a tune and words for a song about the dance of a rhinoceros, a hippopotamus, or an elephant.
  4. Pretend you're an elephant that shrank to the size of a beaver. What adventures might you have?
  5. Pretend that your parents will not let you visit the zoo. You don't know the reason, and you're trying to find out. It has something to do with an uncle that disappeared, a large dog that your parents once owned, phone calls from Australia, and a rug in your family room. Write the story that you unravel from the clues.
  6. Write an imaginary conversation between a giraffe and a rattlesnake.
  7. If you could be any animal in the zoo, which animal would you choose to be? What would be the best things about being that animal? the worst things? Which animal in the zoo would you least like to be? Why? What animals do you know of that do not live in any zoo? Why don't they?
  8. Write a paper telling why you think it is important for people to support zoos.
  9. Write a paper explaining the important role that zoos play in preserving threatened and endangered species.
  10. Write a history of zoos in the United States or Canada. Where were the first zoos and what where they like?

Plan a Zoo Trip
  1. Make reservations for the zoo visit and special programs during the visit. ... . Does anyone need special help?
  2. What will you take? (lunch; money for admission; snacks; books; souvenirs; clothing for humid rain forest exhibits, unexpected cold or rainy weather; ...individual name tags (if necessary); etc.)
  3. What should you know about the zoo ahead of time? Write or call for a map to study before you go. What are the feeding times for various animals? What is the schedule for special demonstrations?
  4. What else is at the zoo besides the animals? Many zoos are called zoological gardens. What is special about the garden at your zoo? What kinds of bushes, flowers, and trees are there?
  5. Define rules for (all going); buddy system, staying together as a ..., small (group). Will you have specific assignments to complete at the zoo?
  6. What are typical rules at the zoo? Why are there rules like no feeding the animals, no radios, no bikes, no skates, no skateboards, no littering, no dogs or other pets, no running, no loud noises or yelling at animals, no tapping on glass cages, no balloons?
  7. Read before you go. Ask for information about the zoo so you'll know what's going on right now. what's new, what's special. Read about your special animal before you see it at the zoo.
  8. After your zoo visit, talk about it. What did you learn? What did you see that you didn't expect? What will you look for next time?
  9. Write thank-you letters to adults who went with you to the zoo and any special people at the zoo.




                                                                 Zoomath

  1. The operating budget for one zoo is $2,976,118, which it receives from the following sources:
         52% public and government support                                                                 
         37% self-generated
         11% donations
         a. How much money does the zoo receive from each of these sources?
         b. How would a zoo generate income?

      2.  The zoo pays 63% of its budget for wages. How much money is that?
      3.  Animal feed costs $232, 396. What percentage of the total budget is that? Round off your        
          answers to the nearest dollar or percentage. What percentage of its budget does your family
          spend for food?
       4. If the zoo contains 1,300 inhabitants, how much does it cost to feed each animal? Why would
           that figure be a very rough estimate?
       5.  During a five-year period. the following amounts were spent for purchasing new animals:
                     1989--$5,928                    1990--86,773                      1991--25,738
                     1992--14,725                     1993--9,156
           a. What is the total amount spent in the five years for purchase of animals?
           b. What is the average yearly amount spent for the five-year period?
           c. Think of several reasons to explain why the amount varies so much from year to year.
      6.  If this zoo is located on 23 acres, how much room does each animal have? Why is that a VERY
           rough average?
      7.  The following list shows the size of some zoos in the United States:
                    Philadelphia                            42 acres
                    San Diego
                        Balboa Park                       100 acres
                        Wild Animal Park             1,800 acres
                    Bronx                                     265 acres
                    Brookfield                               204 acres
                    Minnesota                              480 acres
            a. What is the average size of these zoos?
            b. A measurement that is often more meaningful than the average is the median. The median is
                found by locating the middle number of the total. The median of the above figures would be
                halfway between 204 and 265 acres. What would that figure be? How does that differ from
                the average?
            c. How many acres does the zoo nearest you have?
       8.  In 1990, one zoo had 870 mammals, 595 birds, and about 1,274 reptiles, amphibians, and fish.
            a. What is the total number of animals?
            b. What percentage of the animals are mammals?
       9.  The food for these animals costs $563,942.
            a. What is the average cost of feeding each animal?
            b. How does that figure compare with the feeding cost of the first zoo in Number 3
                on the preceding page?
      10.  This zoo has the following number of permanent staff members:
                     Animal care                            91
                     Maintenance                           55
                     Visitor Services and Security    24
                     Administration and Support       72
             a. What is the total number of employees?
             b. What percentage of employees are involved in animal care?
       11.  A zoo charges $5.00 for admission.
             a. If 103,241 visitors paid admission, how much revenue did that provide for the zoo?
             b. Would that amount pay a feed bill of $587,000?
             c. If no, where else would the zoo get money to buy the food?
             d. What other expenses does a zoo have besides feed?
       12.  Look at the following list showing the number of animals and species at various zoos:
                                                        Vertebrate Animals                   Species
              Toronto                                         2,739                                481
              Dallas                                          1,456                                 321
              Toledo                                          2,000                                 400
              Los Angeles                                 2,000                                  500
              Philadelphia                                 1,700                                   550
              a. Make a graph to show both numbers for each zoo.
              b. Roughly, what would be the average number of species that the zoos have?
              c. If you could find the average for a species, do you think the number would be meaningful?
                  Why or why not?
 
 

More of June Calendar for Summer Lessons

Posted on August 31, 2014 at 10:56 AM Comments comments (48)
I am so pleased with all the answers I am receiving about the blogs and some of the material. It is very flustering when one is trying to get material to people and the machines just don't get the message that it is important. I do appreciate people being so patient with me.
There are a few more events to me added to June 12 history line from Book (1) as follows:

June 12, 1956 The Official Flag of the U.S. Army was adopted.

June 12,  1974 Little League was opened to girls.

June 12, 1979 Bryan Allen became the First Person to Fly a
Human Powered Aircraft across the English Channel.
He supplied the power of pedaling.


June 13 has two birthdays as follows:

June 13, 1786 Winfield Scott, American army general, was born.

June 13, 1865 William Butler Yeats, Irish poet, was born.

The events are as follows:

June 13, 1789 Mrs. Alexander Hamilton served ice cream for
dessert at a Dinner Party for George Washington.

June 13, 1893 Thomas Stewart patented the MOP.

June 13, 1927 New York City honored Charles Lindbergh
with a ticker-tape parade.

June 13, 1956 British Troops Withdrew from the Suez Canal,
turning over the waterway's operation to Egypt.

Book (1) has got this to say: "Canal mapping-Have your (children) locate the Suez Canal on a world map and name the two major bodies of water it connects. Then ask them to name the major canal in the Americas and locate it on the world map. Which  two bodies of water does it link? Why are canals important?

June 13, 1966 The Supreme Court handed down the Miranda Ruling,
which required that crime suspects in police custody be informed of their rights.

Book (1) says in "Supreme powers-Tell your (children) that President Lyndon Johnson nominated Thurgood Marshall for the U.S. Supreme Court. Then have them use an almanac to find out the nine current Supreme Court Justices and the presidents who nominated each of them. Some people believe a president's greatest power is the ability to nominate Supreme Court justices. Ask your students why this might be true."

June 13, 1983 Pioneer 10 became the First Man-Made
Object to Leave the Solar System.

Book (1) says in "Spectacular space missions-When Pioneer 10 left the solar system in 1983, it was a landmark event in aerospace history. Ask you (children) to imagine the kinds of space missions that might occur over the next 50 years. Have them make a list of their ideas. Then have them draw a futuristic space vehicle and describe its first-of-a-kind mission."


June 14 is full of history starting with the birthdays as follows:

June 14, 1811 Harriet Beecher Stowe, American author who wrote
Uncle Tom's Cabin, was born.

June 14, 1945 Bruce Degan, children's illustrator, was born.

June 14, 1948 Laurence Yep, children's author, was born.

June 14, 1958 Eric Heiden, American speed skater who won
five gold medals at the 1980 Winter Olympics
at Lake Placid, N.Y., was born.

June 14, 1969 Steffi Graf, German Tennis star, was born.

Then there is also all the events for that day as follows:

June 14, 1777 The Continental Congress adopted the
Stars and Stripes as The Official American Flag.

Book (1) gives an activity for the children for this event under "National symbol-On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress adopted this brief resolution: "That the Flag of the United States be 13 stripes alternate red and white, and that the Union be 13 stars white in a blue field representing a new constellation." But Congress didn't make a sketch of the new flag, so people weren't sure how big the field of blue should be, how to arrange the stars, how many points the stars should have, or how wide the stripes should be. Ask your (children) to design their own flags based on the original resolution. Your (family) will be surprised by all the possible variations. Today, the size, color, and placement of each star and stripe is stipulated by executive order."

June 14, 1834 The First Practical Diving Suit was patented.

June 14, 1834 Sandpaper was patented.

June 14, 1846 Settlers in Sonoma, Calif., proclaimed California a republic.

June 14, 1900 The Hawaiian Islands became U.S. territory.

June 14, 1919 The First Nonstop Transatlantic Flight was
completed after 16 hours.

Book (1) gives the following activity with the title "Flying heroes-Tell your (children) that pilot John Alcock and navigator Arthur Brown flew nonstop from Newfoundland to Clifden, Ireland, despite numerous in-flight problems. For instance, an overheated exhaust pipe turned to liquid and blew away. A snowstorm caused ice to form on the airplane's instruments, and Brown had to climb out onto the wings to chip it away. And a dense fog so disoriented the men that they nearly crashed into the Atlantic Ocean. (The fog lifted suddenly, allowing Alcock to pull up after seeing he was just 100 feet above the ocean.) Challenge your (children) to uncover more details about this historic flight. Then encourage them to create front-page stories or television news reports about these men. (The children)  might also like to role-play Alcock and Brown and answer (others') questions about their adventure."

June 14, 1922 Warren G. Harding became the First U.S. President
to Make a Presidential Radio Broadcast.

June 14, 1938 The Caldecott Medal, for the Most distinguished
American picture book for children, was awarded for the first time.

June 14, 1951 Univac I, The First Commercially Built Computer,
went into operation at the Census Bureau in Philadelphia.

June 14, 1991 The National Video Game and Coin-op
Museum opened in St. Louis, Mo.

June 14 is also Flag Day and Hug Pledge Day


June 15 is just as eventful but has only the following two birthdays:

June 15, 1954 Jim Belushi, American actor, was born.

June 15, 1958 Wade Boggs, baseball star, was born.

Following are the events for June 15:

June 15, 1752 Ben Franklin Flew a Kite during a lightning storm
and proved that lightning is an electrical charge.

Book (1) makes an activity of this most famous event in "High-flying adventures-To mark the day that Ben Franklin used a kite to prove that lightning is an electrical charge, bring in a kite and suspend it from the ...ceiling. Then share Tom Moran's Kite Flying Is for Me with your (children). Next, ask the kids to write and illustrate poems about Franklin's electrifying experiment."

June 15, 1775 George Washington was appointed
Commander in Chief of the Continental Army.

June 15, 1836 Arkansas became the 25th state.

June 15, 1844 Charles Goodyear patented a process for vulcanizing rubber.

June 15, 1854 The First Ice Cream Factory opened.

June 15, 1864 Arlington National Cemetery was established.

June 15, 1877 Henry O. Flipper became the First Black Graduate of West Point.

June 15, 1889 Congress created the National Zoological Park.

Grandma thought there might me a more appropriate spot for the Following Units in Book (57), but as she looks at things this has to be the best spot to start lessons on these following topics:

The first mention here is of National Parks and considering summer is a great time to visit or go to National Parks. A couple of these Grandma will write about and give activities for. She will finish them in November. Consider there is mention of Mountains in these parks Grandma wants you to know also that she has plans to cover that in November if she hasn't already.
The next mention in this event is that of the Zoos. Book (57) has a Unit also to tie with the study of the animals which I feel is best to start here and move these on into September then begin them again in May.
Then it opens the door for the study of insects throughout the summer and into September then picks up again in the spring when butterflies, Ants, and Bees begin to be seen again. Book (57) not only has a section on Butterflies, but a big one on Ants. Grandma feels there should be as much study on bees as well because as one book Grandma has points out there is becoming a problem of many bees dying unexpectedly lately as well as the production of butterflies. Many people believe it is due to the production of Monsanto and other types of pesticides we are developing in our plants for protection. They are contaminating our own water and the cattle's. How can we expect the birds and bees to survive it, as well as the butterflies. Do some research on that in the next few weeks and see what you discover.

"The National Parks" by Pat O'Brien from Book (57) and Grandma will finish it up in November starts out with the following information:

"Four parks, a monument, and a seashore have been selected for study here. They represent areas in the United States national park system that have been set aside for the protection off natural wonders and the enjoyment of the people. Hopefully the information, questions, and wonders that are a part of the nation's heritage.

Grand Canyon National Park
For many years nature has been at work carving a masterpiece. Mountains formed and eroded. Seas covered the area and dried up, leaving layers of sediment. Running water, heat, frost, wind, gravity, uplifting, and faulting have combined to determine the formations of the Grand Canyon. (It is famously visited by many people.)

Vocabulary
Define the following terms: bluff, batte, plateau, mountain, canyon, and gorge.

History
For centuries, Native Americans had made the canyon their home. Most early explorers were looking for land to settle and riches to mine. From their point of view the canyon was awe=inspiring, but not practical.
The first white men to view the Grand Canyon in 1540 were conquistadors in search of gold. John Wesley Powell explored the canyon by boat in 1869. He and his party risked their lives running the white water rapids. As dangerous as it was, he believed it was worth a  great deal to see it. Theodore Roosevelt became aware of the need to preserve the beauty for generations to come. As President in 1908, he declared the Grand Canyon a national monument. It was to become a national park in 1919.
Imagine what these explorers might have said when they first saw the canyon. Make a list of quotes.

Special Study: Rocks (This is where Grandma's families greatest interests are.)
The Grand Canyon is composed of many elaborate rock formations. There are three main classes of rock, igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic. They are classified by how they are formed.
  1. Collect and identify rocks. Where in nature would you find each type? 
  2. Read to find out how each type is formed, Compile the information into a booklet entitled All About Rocks.
  3. Make rock rubbings. Use them to create a collage.
  4. Compile a glossary to describe the rocks .... .

What to See
Because of the varied elevations throughout the park, There are different climates. Deep in the canyon it is hot and dry. There, desert plants and animals may be seen.
The North Rim features a cool mountain climate. The North Rim is the only place in the world where the Kaibab squirrel may be found.
High desert and mountain climates combine along the lower South Rim. Chipmunks and deer live among the piñon and juniper forests there.

What to Do
There are hiking trails for viewing the various formations and wildlife in the park. In the summer, hiking into canyon is difficult because of the hot, dry climate. Mules also take riders into the canyon. Another view is from the river looking up.
Would you want to see the Grand Canyon by walking along the rim, hiking or riding a mule down into the canyon, flying overhead, or rafting on the Colorado? Survey members of your class to find out which they would prefer. Graph the results.


Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
Within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park there are two active volcanoes: Mauna Loa and Kilauea. These volcanoes are seldom explosive. The magma is fluid and low in gas, producing shield volcanoes, gently sloping volcanic mountains resembling a warrior's shield.
  1. Draw a map of the island of Hawaii. Show the two volcanoes.
     2.  Plan a tour of the area. What other places of interest could you visit?

Birth of an Island
A hot spot, an immense reservoir of molten rock below the surface of the Pacific. Plate, is responsible for building the Hawaiian Islands. Magma is forced up between the cracks of the plate. After contless eruptions of lava, a new volcano grows for thousands of years until it rises above the surface of the sea to form an Island.
  1. If the island of Hawaii "grew" out of the ocean, where did the plants and animals come from?
  2. Use a series of illustrations to show how an island is formed. Write a label for each picture.

Special Study: Volcanoes
The three main types of volcanoes are shield, cinder cone, and composite. Compare the three kinds of discover how they are alike and different.

Something to Do
  1. Organize the information you have collected into a book titled, All About Volcanoes.(Tie this to the unit learned about Disasters I will be finishing this year from Book (57) also.)
  2. Make a diagram showing the inside of a volcano. Include the conduit, vent, crater, magma, steam, and lava flow.

In the Beginning
The early Hawaiians made up stories to explain volcanic eruptions. They believed that Pele, the goddess of fire, showed her displeasure with them by causing eruptions that sent flaming lava down to destroy their homes. Create your own myth to explain how volcanoes are formed. Write and illustrate the story.
Today scientists better understand how volcanoes erupt. They use delicate instruments to predict volcanic activity. They usually know where the eruption will occur but not how powerful it will be."
(That is all Grandma will give about National  Parks for now. Next will be about Zoos and then Grandma will move into Units on Insects.)


Play Ball

Posted on August 29, 2014 at 11:42 PM Comments comments (35)
Grandma is writing when Nebraska will be playing their first football game for the year this weekend. However, she has decided that since much of the work she has given you has been so late at getting there she wants you to understand that much of it can be carried on into September and throughout the year. Whatever it takes to add to the learning. Various sports is one of the lessons Grandma begins with so this could be used as an introductory to that lesson. The history you will receive for the summer months can just be given as that and added to what you have and you can start out again with the beginning of time and move onto each time in history, placing a little bit of the Bible at a time on the line as you cover it.
Grandma has worked very hard to make connection today with the interference of the storms. She kept loosing her wireless router connection today as well as a problem with making InternetInternet connection again. The gal sent out some signals and the rain that had just came down as well as another push on the plug-in to the modem possibly did it finally; after my husband just had to spend $35 on new cords a guy the other day said it might be making part of the problem.
Therefore, Grandma is going to give the rest of the unit in Book (57) on the baseball games she gave some information to you last night from. It is as follows except for the Bibliography I will give you later:

"Take Me Out to the Ball Game!

Whole Group Introductory Activities

Showing a film such as Field of Dreams, The Rookie, Babe, or Rookie of the Year is an excellent way to introduce this unit.(A League of Their Own; which is a movie about women first playing softball or baseball is showing on This ,a movie channel in Omaha, NE, this weekend.) Viewing a televised game, attending a live game, or holding a (group) baseball game are other suitable introductory activities . Before beginning, establish rules for working at the centers and a routine for moving from center to center. (A center is an area of a home or school with each of subjects such as math, social studies, history, language and reading, writing, art, science, and health or physical education. Grandma has area in her home for each of these subjects some are named different things as a work area, Disney area, play House area, Play store, and even another additional area for Media as movies, comedy as jokes, riddles, comics etc. Some things still need some more organization and some things are done at the table still for art, writing, etc.It is getting better and better. Because of my knees I have actually failed to do my gardening totally outside because I cannot stand long at all now, which SSI is not allowing me to call it a disability and want me to go out to a job making phone calls. My husband knows I cannot even do that since I can hardly get about very fast he says. I know I could reach my grandson in danger fast enough a while back though. However, each area can be called simply what it is for either reading, language, social studies, history, writing, art, science, health or physical education even besides the physical games or dances you may preform. Someone stated they felt bowling and golf were not a physical activity. They are very wrong there. I have totally forgotten the teaching of music and that is really one of my favorite subjects to teach and use as a tool for learning. For by the way you can use many things as tools for learning as dolls, decorating rooms, posters, films or making videos, pretending things is even a tool, acting out things or role playing, puppets. Anything you can think to help get the concept through the same as blocks to build with or colored pencils or things drawn on paper; anything to help.) You may wish to set up all centers at the same time and have (the children) rotate through the complete cycle in their cooperative groups, or you may choose to have (the children) complete half the centers and then set up the other half. Another option is to have the (children) complete half the activities in cooperative (work with others) and then allow (the children) to select individually from the remaining activities. You might have students complete some of the activities as individual contracts. (Each unit of topic like baseball to a country to fairy tales might be handled different than even an ongoing subject as all the continents and countries to art and math or an interchange of a play store used as part of math but maybe math in another area or all the individual other areas or centers as well as by itself somewhere. History and the time line might even be handled with only a part of history in an area or an area of study rather than all of it together along with the Bible study on the line as well with many books included for them to read.)

Small Group Activities
Where It All Began

There are several conflicting theories about how baseball began. Some contend it was adapted from cricket.Others state that Abner Doubleday invented the game in Cooperstown, New York, in 1839. (Football grew out of the game we call Soccer, but in Mexico they call Soccer Futbol.) At this center, have students work in cooperative groups to brainstorm possible origins of baseball. Have them select their most original idea and write a myth or legend telling how baseball originated, and then perform a reader's theater version of their story for (others). (Now Grandma might set this up in what she calls the children's work area where they can dress-up to go to work at a desk where there is a pretend computer or real one to use and pretend they are doing it for work then come home to their house area when done and pretend they are working in a restaurant and fixing a meal or go to the store and buy food. Else she may set it up to be done at a play school desk to be done as an assignment in a separate writing area. If she thought of it as a history lesson or social study lesson she may assign it to be done close to those areas. If after a movie she might assign it to be done in another room of the house. This is how it works.)

The Playing Field
Baseball is played on an area divided into an infield of definite measurement and an outfield that varies from ballpark to ballpark. The infield is a square with 90' (27.4 m) sides. The corner farthest from the outfield fence is home plate, and the other bases run counterclockwise. The pitcher's mound is an 18' (5.5 m) circle inclining toward a small rectangular rubber slab in the center. It lies inside the square, 60' 6" (18 m) from home plate. The outfield ends at an outer fence, and its distance from home plate varies with the shape of the field. The fence is usually about 250' to 450' (76 to 137 m) from home plate.
Provide (the children) with the above information, and have them work ...to sketch a blueprint of their "ideal" ballpark (at the work desk as mine, an art table, little school desk, the health, physical education area, reading and language area, math area, history area, newspaper writing area, or the social study area if not where they watched a movie with you.) Have them create a scale model of the park. Encourage (the children) to consider dugouts, dressing rooms, concession booths, parking, washrooms, press box, handicapped accessibility, and anything else that is necessary to their plans. When (the children) have completed their models, have them "sell" their ideas to (you or others).

How Many Miles?
At this center, provide students with the formula for calculating area, perimeter, and circumference. Have them create ballpark problems involving running the bases, outlining the base path, and edging the pitcher's mound. Ask (the children) to include realistic problems in which the calculation of area, perimeter, and circumference is necessary. Have each ...write its problems so that (another person) at the center (if their could be a friend, relative, etc.) can solve them and add problems of their own. When all (children) have completed the practice area, perimeter, volume, circumference, and so on. I would use a separate math area or where the movie or maybe the work area for this unless it was near the history area.)

The Great Baseball Machine

Several machines have been invented to use in ballparks. These are machines that provide easy maintenance of the ballpark, line the field, sell tickets and record sales, provide music and other special effects in the stadium, and assist ball players with their practices. There are even machines that measure the speed of a pitch, computers that record statistics, and pitching machines. (Think of even the things they have in video games now.) At this center, have (the children) brainstorm possible technological advances which might occur in the future of baseball. Have (the children) select their best ideas and draw sketches or create models of them to "sell" to (others).

Let's Hear It for the Team!
At this center provide lists of baseball teams currently in the American and National Leagues. ... Also provide (the children) with a list of Baseball Hall of Famers (which Grandma already provided you with.) Have the (children) reach a consensus on a perfect ball team. Invite (the children) to create their own "dream teams" by selecting members  from any present or past baseball team for each of the nine positions, designated hitter, and coach. Have (the children) share their line-ups with (others as yourself or the person they are learning with), indicating the player in each position. Ask (the children) to justify their choices by using player statistics. Have them name their new teams and create uniforms for the newest additions to the league!

Shoeless Joe
W.P Kinsella is a modern North American writer who has won great acclaim for his tales of baseball in the Midwest. Perhaps the best known of these is Shoeless Joe, from which the movie "Field of Dreams" was adapted. At the center, provide book excerpts and a selection of novels about baseball. Have the (children) read selections and attempt to write their own baseball stories in which local characters are brought to life. (From what I have told you, I will let you decide where the best place for this would be-maybe use it as a homework assignment-to give them plenty of time for it.)

ERAs and RBIs
At this center, provide baseball cards and other sources that identify player statistics. Have the (children) examine the statistics of ten players and create charts or graphs comparing the players. In their presentation to (you or others), have (the children) share why they selected their ten players. Have the (children) create mathematical problems involving average (mean), median, and mode statistics using the information from player cards. Have (the children) submit these problems for later use in mathematics. ... .(This is a third thing that could be used in a math center by itself. They could be given one a day.)

Casey at Bat
At this center, provide students with a copy of "Casey at Bat" and any other appropriate baseball poetry.  Have the (children) use the ideas to create sequels telling what happened to Casey, write their own original baseball ballads, or write prose playscript selections of Casey's batting incident for presentation as plays.

Take Me Out to the Ball Game
At this center, provide a recording of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" or any other baseball songs. Have the (children) create baseball rally songs for their favorite teams and teach them to the (you and others)!
(Now Grandma would do this in her Music area which is also in the living room with much of the reading and Social Studies.)

Baseball Trivia
At this center, provide baseball cards, trivia books (see bibliography), and Trivial Pursuit™ or another trivia game. Have (the children) work cooperatively to create their own baseball trivia cards. Have each (child) at the center read the cards that are already there and add their own original cards to the cooperative ...game. They can use friends or family members to help them with this lesson.

Baseball Bibliography
Have (the children) examine the bibliography provided at the end of this unit. Have them use baseball books, card catalogs, electronic encyclopedias,and other sources to create their own annotated bibliographies with at least twelve books, pamphlets, audio-visual resources, journals, and resource people.Show (the children) a sample style for an annotated bibliography.
(I Grandmother does not or cannot provide you with this Bibliography as she will try wait 'till she can for this or obtain what you can from the library.)

Baseball Hall of Fame Greats
At this center, provide pictures of famous ball players. Have (the children) use pen and ink, charcoal, or paint to create their own portraits of present or future Hall of Fame players. (Guess what center Grandma would use here.)

Cricket/Baseball Controversy
For decades, the controversy has raged over which is the better sport--baseball or cricket. Have the students examine material explaining how each game is played and prepare charts showing similarities and differences between the two sports. Have them consider such things as: rules, cost, equipment, playing fields, officials, number of players, and skills required. Have them prepare a statement defending one of the games as the greater sport and providing supporting reasons for their choice. (A good assignment for your newspapers.)(If you had not finished out your yearbook, it would be a good time to now also.)

I'm Conducting a Survey
At this center, have (the children) prepare questions examining preferences for games watched and games played. Encourage them to include both males and females of different age groups, levels of education, occupations, and socioeconomic levels as they conduct their surveys. Invite (the children) to include as many sports as they wish, but have everyone include baseball as one of the choices. Have (the children) conduct their survey with relatives, neighbors, school friends, and so on. Then have them compile their data individually and (together with others) and analyze the results. Have them prepare charts and graphs to share their data with (you and others).(Maybe this would be best as homework but as part of a math center and the newspaper area.)

Baseball Food(Remember fruits and vegetables are part of June's monthly project and that of food is important in lessons for September.)
For years, hot dogs, soda, and pretzels have been considered ballpark food. Have (the children) brainstorm other foods they could sell at their new ballparks. Have them select and prepare marketing campaigns to "sell" their new ballpark food to (you and others).

The Quiet Hero
Provide biographical information of famous ball players, past and present. Have each (child) select a player and use the "Bio-Poem" format (Grandma is providing below) to create a bio-poem for that player. Have (the children) create pencil sketches of these players to illustrate their poems. Display completed editions of the poems and sketches, then mount them in a book for the (family, friends, and others). (This part even though it has parts of art which could be part of the newspaper or yearbook areas, but Grandma still would probably make it part of the language area. However, language could be part of the newspaper or yearbook area vice versus.)
Bio-Poem Pattern
Line one: Poem title (Person)
Line two: Three adjectives to describe the person.
Line three: A significant accomplishment.
Line four: A detail of early family life.
Line five: An early career/school accomplishment.
Line six: Something for which you will remember this person. The reason you picked (them).
Line seven: A word, phrase, or saying synonymous with this person's name.
                   (Example: The "Say Hey" kid.)

The Great American Pastime
It has been said that baseball is woven into the fiber of American life--that within the game, all the lessons of life can be learned. Have (the children) work (you or friends) to brainstorm the lessons about life that can be learned on the ball field.

Indoor Baseball
Have (the children) consider how baseball could be played in a living room or recreation room (or as a board game or video game) with young children. Have them rewrite the rules and redesign the equipment to adapt the game to the change in setting and age group. Have them demonstrate the new game with a group of primary children in a gym, library, or classroom.

Great Moments in Baseball
Provide biographical materials about Baseball Hall of Famers. Have (the children) select members of the Baseball Hall of Fame listed and what might be added since the time of Book (57) in the 1990's. Have each (child) prepare a one-page biographical sketch of a player's great moment in the sport. The data should include: stats, position played, teams played for, family life, date of birth and death, and any other interesting facts. Have (each child) check their chosen players off the list so that the next (child) does not select the same player. Completed pages may be bound, illustrated, and placed in the (house or a special place).

What Makes a Great Coach?
Have (the children) brainstorm the characteristics of a good coach. When the (children) have made a long list, have each (child) create an extended simile. Provide the following examples: a good coach is like a parent; a good coach is like a guardian angel; a good coach is like a good sandwich. When each (child) has written a simile, have them complete their comparisons using data from their list of characteristics.(Another good project for the newspaper, yearbook, or language center or area. By the way folks the newspaper and yearbook could be a part of the language area or center. Else the language a part of the newspaper and yearbook area or center. Art could be a part of it all also.)

Baseball in a Box
Have (the children) use the rules of baseball to create a baseball board game for 8 to 10 year olds. Have them write the rules and package the game attractively.

Cartoon Capers
Have (the children) examine comic strip sequences of the Charlie Brown baseball series. Have them create their own cartoon characters with baseball as the topic for four-frame comic strips.(use your own judgement here of where to do it)

The San Diego Chicken
Many major  league teams have a mascot. The Toronto Blue Jays have the blue jay, the St. Louis Cardinals have a cardinal, the Detroit Tigers have the tiger, and the San Diego Padres have the famous chicken. Have the students create team mascots for their local or created baseball teams. Then encourage them to design costumes and routines for these mascots. (This gave Grandma a great addition to this unit of using puppets to play out games or act them out themselves.)

Field of Dreams
Artists like Ken Danby have captured the magic of a sport in their art. Invite (the children) to work cooperatively (with you or group of friends, etc.) on a mural that captures the magic of baseball. Before beginning, have (the children) discuss how to represent their ideas in a mural. It would be helpful to provide pictures relating to baseball at this center. This mural can be on paper, a poster, or a wall if wish.

Whole Group Concluding Activities
The main purpose of the concluding activities is to share the products of the various centers and to celebrate the learning that has taken place. Any or all of the following activities would constitute a fitting finale for this unit.
  • Share products of the centers through displays, presentations, newspaper coverage, an open house, an assembly, and so on.
  • Go to a live ball game.
  • Have "Baseball Day" in which each (child) wears team apparel, has baseball food for lunch, sings baseball songs, and plays a school baseball game or tournament.
  • View a film, such as The Rookie, Field of Dreams, Babe, or Rookie of the Year.


Non-Fiction Bibliography
Angel, R. Once More Around the Park, 1991.
Allen, E. Baseball: Play and Strategy, (3rd ed.), 1983.
Appeal, M. and Goldblatt, B. Baseball's Best: The Hall of Fame Gallery, (rev. ed.), 1989.
______, Baseball Encyclopedia, (6th ed.), 1985.
Child, M. How to Play Baseball, 1951.
Einstein, C. The Pitcher's Story, 1967.
Honig, D. When the Grass Was Real, 1975.
James, B. Historical Baseball Abstract, (rev.ed.), 1988.
___, The Baseball Book, 1990.
Kahn, R. Good Enough to Dream, 1985.
Laird, A. W. Ranking Baseball's Elite: An Analysis Derived from Player Statistics 1893-1987,1990.
Levine, P. Spalding and the Rise of Baseball: The Promise of the American Sport, 1985.
Mantle, M. The Quality of Courage, 1964.
Mays, W. My Secrets of Playing Baseball, 1967.
Petersen, R. Only the Ball Was White, 1985.
Reichler, J. The Baseball Encyclopedia. (6th ed.), 1985.
Ritter, L. The Glory of Their Times, 1984.
Robertson, J. OK! OK! Blue Jays, 1983.
Seymour, H. Baseball: The Early Years, 1960.
____, Baseball: The Golden Age, 1971.
____, Baseball: The People's Games, 1991.
Smith, R. World Series: The Game and the Players, 1967.


Fiction Bibliography
Archibald, J. Bonus Kid, 1959.
____, Shortstop on Wheels, 1962.
Brossman, J. Pennant Race, 1962.
Gelner, S. Baseball Bonus Kid, 1961.
Jackson, C. Hillbilly Pitcher, 1956.
Kinsella, W. P. Shoeless Joe, 1982.
____, Box Socials, 1989.
____, The Iowa Baseball Confederacy, 1979.
____, The Dixon Cornbelt League, 1992.
Porter, M. Winning Pitcher, 1960.
Russell, P. Going, Going, Gone, 1967.
Scholefield, E. Tiger Rookie, 1966.
Scholtz, J. Base Burglar, 1955.
____, Center Fielder Jinx. 1961.
Tunis, J. Highpockets, 1948.
____, Keystone Kids, 1945.
____, Rookie of the Year, 1944.
____, The Kid from Tompkinsville, 1940.
____, World Series, 1941.
____, Wells, B. Five Yard Fuller of the New York Giants, 1967.
Wallop, D. The Year of the Yankees' Pennant, 1964.
Zanger, J. Baseball Spark Plug, 1963.

Some of June for Summer

Posted on August 28, 2014 at 10:45 PM Comments comments (34)
Grandma left off on the birthday of Jacques Cousteau June 11 we will continue with the following:
 
1945 birthday of Robert Munsch, storyteller and children's author
 
1956 birthday of Joe Montana, professional football quarterback
 
Book (1) has an activity called "Sports role models-When Joe Montana started playing sports in grade school, he'd anxiously wait for his father to return from work so they could practice football drills. To develop his passing accuracy, he practiced throwing a football through a moving tire swing. While practicing, he and his best friend would pretend to be stars on the Notre Dame football team. Ask your students to name the athletes they try to emulate."
 
The events for June 11 are as follows:
 
1895 Frank and Charles Duryea were granted a patent on the first Successful Gasoline-Powered- Automobile in the United States.
 
1912 Joseph H. Dickinson of Cranford, N.J., patented the Player Piano.
 
1919 Sir Barton became the First Horse to Win the Triple Crown.
 
1978 A dog named Martha Faye set the Canine Distance Record
for Frisbee Catching when she caught a 334.6-foot toss.
 
1988 Adragon Eastwood Demello--age 11 3/4--became
the Youngest College Graduate on record.
 
It is also Race Unity Day
 
The next day of concern is June 12 as follows:
 
1806 is the birthday of John Augustus Roebling, German-born American
engineer who designed the Brooklyn Bridge
 
1817 is the birthday of Henry David Thoreau, American writer
 
As given in Book (1) under "Simplifying one's life-At the age of 28, Henry David Thoreau built and moved into a cabin on Walden Pond near Concord, Mass. He lived there alone for the next 2 years, growing beans, observing nature, and writing. In large part, Thoreau retreated to Walden Pond to find out what he needed for a fulfilling life and what he could do without. He believed that many of the things society considered necessities were in fact merely distractions, and that the pursuit of them led people to overwork themselves and, in the process, to become unhappy. So he tried to pare his life down to the essentials. Present these ideas to your (children). Then ask each of them to create a list of things that are important in their lives. They might get ideas for the list by thinking about what they spend their time doing. Lists might include such things as housing, TV, music, sports, a VCR, (now DVD's. computer games as well as other games), toys, nice clothes, a bike, (skateboarding), and a telephone. Next, ask the children each to examine their list carefully and to put a check mark next to any items that aren't really necessary but that add significantly to the quality of their life. Have them explain why. Then have them put an X next to any items they could do without and not miss, again telling why. Finally, ask the kids what, if anything, they learned from this exercise."
 
1827 is the birthday of Johanna Spyrl, Swiss author who wrote Heidi
 
1924 is the birthday of George Herbert Walker
Bush, 41st president of the United States
 
1929 is the birthday of Anne Frank, German-Dutch diarist
 
The events for June 12 are as follows:
 
1913 The First Animated Cartoonist, The Dachshund, was released.
 
1917 The Secret Service extended its protection to the president's family.
 
1922 The First Documentary Film--Robert Flaharty's
Nanook of the North--was released.
 
1939 The Baseball Hall of Fame opened in Cooperstown, N.Y.
 
Book (1) says in an activity under "Halls of fame- Tell your (children) the names of the five original members of the Baseball Hall of Fame: Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson, Walter Johnson, and Ty Cobb. Next, have (the children) choose an area of interest and create a "Hall of Fame" for it by selecting five charter members. Have the kids present their choices... ."
 
Book (57) has a unit on Baseball I forgot to mention. In it they give a list of "Some Hall of Famers:
 
Mickey Mantle               Jackie Robinson          Babe Ruth                     Ted Williams
Sandy Koufax                Cy Young                    Abner Doubleday            Branch Rickey
Ferguson Jenkins           Roy Campanella          Christy Mathewson         Hank Aaron
Joe DiMaggio                 Whitey Ford                Ford Frick                      Willie Mays
Lou Gehrig                     Juan Marichal              John McGraw                 Frank Robinson
Satchel Paige                Jim Thorpe                   Honus Wagner               Walter Alston
Johnny Bench                Lou Brock                    Happy Chandler              Bob Feller
Billy Martin                     Carl Hubbell                 Joe McCarthy                 Nolan Ryan
Warren Spahn                Tris Speaker                 Roberto Clemente           Bob Gibson
Lefty Grove                     Al Kaline                      Joe Morgan                    Carl Yastrzemski
Kenesaw Mountain Landis                                  Albert Goodwill Spalding
 
(Grandma will have to finish this in the morning. Problems have dragged her down today that had to be dealt with. The wires on the wireless may be too old and creating a problem but Hughes Net decided to change the security system to the lap top I used in Mexico because it had a problem. Therefore, we went through a whole day session. Now we should be able to finish in prayers. I might get new cords before I finish though. Take care. I will start early and work on.)             

last part of Fishes

Posted on August 28, 2014 at 1:37 AM Comments comments (29)
Grandma had this started last week upon returning from Mexico and her computer system did not want to cooperate. I was set up for a repairman from Hughes Net on September 8th. They called me Monday and said they were coming this Wednesday. What a relief, I was setting up for the library again. The repairman worked in the afternoon and then I called the Hughes Net technicians again and they decided it may also mean it was a bad connection wire which after some signals from him and a switch on wires it began to pick up Internet. I can finally finish the summer work for you. I looked back and classes for my homeschooling did not start till September 8 and the Unit in Book (57) on Oceans would be good to start the lessons again this fall. I will be checking my lessons this year, adding material, and making corrections. I will also add any product I can and work with more people that might help us carry further.
Grandma will finish the unit in Book (57) right now and move back into Book (1) for more Calendar History Line material and activities for June covering Clowns in Book (57). Then Grandma will move into Book (1) with July Calendar History for the Line covering a unit of the Universe in Book (57) and the Calendar History of August. I will work very hard with some long days. The Unit on Oceans in Book (57) should tie us right into the next learning year of Home Schooling.
I will also be giving that book list soon and the material I want to give you from Patricia Gallagher. There are four more activity pages in the Unit on Fishes in Book (57) as follows:
 
"Something Fishy
 
Some fish have interesting names. Choose one of the fish below. On a separate piece of paper, draw a picture of an imaginary fish that fits the name. Below the picture, draw a fictional account describing the creature's features and habits. Then do some research on the fish you've chosen. On a second piece of paper, draw a picture of what the fish really looks like. Below the picture, write factual information about it. Display the papers side by side, or make a booklet by putting your contributions together with those of your (family). Have a contest to design a cover for this unusual "Picture Fishionary." (Some of these fish may have a seperation in the name from the part of the word "fish" to find them.)
 
clown fish                 oarfish                   filefish                  crocodile fish                  hatchet fish
flashlight fish             needle fish             trumpet fish          turkey fish                      batfish
cookie cutter shark    balloonfish            lantern fish            boxfish                           sailfish
hammerhead shark    goosefish              dogfish                 catfish                            sea horse
porcupine fish            sawfish                 jewel fish              stonefish                         lionfish
squirrel fish                butterfly fish          angelfish               tiger shark                      striped drum
parrot fish                  nurse shark           pipefish                 guitarfish                        carpet shark
 
Coral Challenge
 
                                                                                                              Yes              No
Coral formations are made up of many tiny       brain                                     G                P
animals called Coral polyps. Most of a coral     beadlet                                  U                R
formation is made up of the skeletons of          star                                       E                O
these creatures, but the outside of the             staghorn                                A                S
formation is covered with living coral polyps.     goosefoot                               N                T
The polyps have tentacles that are used to
poison small creatures and then push them     whelk                                     C                B
through the mouth into the stomach. Since      elkhorn                                   A                L
each coral formation can be made up of           organ-pipe                               R               A
millions of polyps, it is staggering to think of    Venus's flower basket              M               R
the number of creatures it would take to form   snakelocks                             O                I
a reef more than 1200 miles long. Such a        abalone                                  A                E
reef does exist. To find out the name of this     lettuce                                    R                S
reef, look at the creatures listed. If the
creature is a kind of coral, circle the letter        flower                                      R                H
under the "yes" column. If it is not a kind         crown-of-thorns                        O                E
of coral, circle the letter under the "no"            mushroom                               E                L
column. You will have to use reference            crumb-of-bread                         L                F
materials and maybe even guess at some
of the answers, but keep working on this         What is the mystery place? ___________________
activity until you get an answer that makes
sense.
 
 
 
 
(second page)
 
 
 
Fishy Crafts
 
Balloonfish: Blow up a balloon of any size and shape desired. Tape on paper fins, eyes, etc. Add details with markers. Try changing another balloon into a sea creature other than a fish.
 
Stonefish: Paint a smooth, clean stone to look like the body of any fish desired. Glue on additional
paper parts if desired.
 
Cookie cutter shark: Use cookie cutters shaped like sharks of other sea creatures to make animals from modeling clay or dough.
 
Jewel fish: Mix 1/2 cup flour, 1/4 cup salt, and 1/6 cup water together in a bowl. Knead the dough with your hands. Add a little flour if the mixture is too sticky or a little water if the mixture is too dry. Then
use the dough to mold a shark medallion, sea horse necklace, clown fish charm, etc. Be sure to poke holes in jewelry to which you will add string or cord when dry. (Grandma suggests adding jewels to it if you wish. The picture shows it looking like a shaped piece of diamond or cut jewel. I suggest trying some food coloring if you wish.)
 
Boxfish: Cut a fish shape out of a piece of paper. Place a dab of tempera paint on the inside corners of a box lid. Put your fish shape in the center of the box lid. Place a marble in the box lid and tilt the box lid back and forth so the marble moves around and paints a design on your fish.
 
(pictures on these two pages are as follows: The first page has a scene of coral a fish, star fish, sponge, and a sea anemone on the bottom of the sea; the second page shows pictures of the jewel fish, balloon fish, a needle fish, a guitar fish, and a saw fish. The rest of the second page follows:)
 
Underwater Scene
 
The sea is filled with colorful sponges, sea anemones, corals, sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and sea lilies. In places where they are found, the sea bottom looks like a beautiful underwater garden. The flower-like appearance of these individuals, however, is deceiving. Though many have names like Venus's flower basket and rose coral, they are not plants. They are animals.
Make a diorama of an underwater scene, or better yet, transform your (learning area or home) into an undersea world. Use crepe-paper streamers for seaweed, inverted paper cups with thin strips of tissue paper for sea anemones, and painted paper sea creatures hanging from the ceiling. Add some seashells, clay snails, and starfish to the floor in areas where they won't be stepped on. Be sure to display some of the activity sheets and projects from this unit.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Following is page 3 of the rest of the end of the unit:)
 
 
 
 
Vocabulary of the Sea
 
Use any reference materials available to help you complete this activity. Color the spaces according to the color code.
 
        fish-yellow                  mammals-green        mollusks-blue         all others-red
 
walrus             
humpback
whale
sea otter
flounder
lobster
sea
urchin
bottlenose
dolphin
halibut
clown
fish
swallower
coral
angler
dugong
manatee
narwhal
grunion
shrimp
sea
anemone
sole
hammerhead
shark
sea lion
whale
shark
barnacle
sturgeon
death
 puffer
sea
horse
clam
barracuda
snail
 
killer
whale
seal
harbor
porpoise
stonefish
Portuguese
man-of-war
 
turtle
starfish
tuna
mussel
moray
eel
conch
sponge
 
snapper
oyster
cockle
limpet
 
sailfish
bass
abalone
stingray
squid
 
 
jellyfish
manta
ray
sea slug
octopus
scallop
  
 
 
  1. Make up as many words as you can from the letters in stonefish. Then choose any of the animals above and make up as many words as you can from its name. Have a contest to see whose choice yields the most words.
  2. Make rebus puzzles out of five of the creatures above. Give them to other (friends) to solve. Your puzzles can use clues that look like parts of the answer or they can yield the exact spelling. Some examples are given. (It shows rebus puzzles as different small pictures of things with plus or  minus signs in between giving the names of the pictures together to form a name. For instance they used a bottle, plus a nose, plus a doll, plus an arrow showing the fin of a fish to make the word bottlenose dolphin; then they used a corn on the cob, plus a chain minus rain to make the word conch.)
  3. List the mammals in alphabetical order. As a super challenge, list all the creatures in alphabetical order.
  4. Scramble the letters in ten of the words. Exchange your ten words with those of a classmate. Without looking at the words given in the chart, unscramble as many of the exchanged words as you can in ten minutes. Score one point for each correctly-spelled word. The winner is the one with the most points.
  5. Cut out the squares in the chart and place them in a fish bowl or other container. Play this game with one other player. Without looking, choose a square. Read the creature's name to the other player. If he or she can spell it correctly, the player may keep the square. If he or she cannot spell it correctly, the player may look at the correct spelling, then put the square back into the bowl. Take turns choosing words for one another to spell. The winner is the one with the most word squares at the end of ten minutes or when the container is empty.
  6. Choose five of the creatures in the chart. Write sentences with words beginning with the letter in the creature's name. These can serve as a mnemonic device for helping you to remember how to spell the words.
 
 
 
 
 
(Following is the fourth and last activity page of the fish unit:)
 
 
 
 
 
Math and More Creature Feature
 
Solve the problems to fill in some of the blanks. Use the following words to fill in the other blanks: sea wasp, coelacanth, giant squid, megamouth, narwhal, sunstar, and sea otter.
 
  1. The ___________________wraps itself in kelp to keep from floating away while it naps. It likes to eat mollusks and cracks them open by banging them against a stone which it rests on its chest. Hunted for its fur, it became extremely rare at one time. An international agreement  in ___________________(784 + 849 + 278), however, helped to save this creature from extinction. (Extra: Make a list of water creatures that are endangered. Write a report about one of them.)
  2. The __________________is a jellyfish with ________________(225 + 15) tentacles, each of which may be more than __________(2 x 3 x 5) feet in length. Its sting is almost always  lethal to humans. (Extra: This creature's name is misleading. The horseshoe crab, the sea spider, the cuttlefish, and the crab-eater seal also have misleading names. Find out why their names do not correctly describe them. Then make a list of other misleading sea creatures' names.)
  3. Oceanographers first learned of the existence of the shark called _______________________in _______________________(892 + 196 + 888) when it was caught by accident and hauled aboard a US Navy vessel. The inside of its mouth glows in the dark, possibly to attract the small animals it feeds upon. (Extra: Pretend you are a newscaster. Give a one-minute account of the discovery.)
  4. Scientists thought the __________________had been extinct for more than___________________(12 x 5) million years until one was caught off the coast of South Africa in ____________________(2020 - 82). (Extra: Write a headline and newspaper article about this catch.)
  5. With a diameter of ________(104 + 63 + 203) cm, the eye of the _______________is the largest of any animal. In comparison, a human eye is only about _____(24 ÷ 8) cm in diameter. The creature can be _________(10 x 5)feet in total length and can weigh _________(36 ÷ 18) tons. (Extra: Find out interesting facts about the eyes of the following: octopus, flounder, and horseshoe crab.)
  6. Of all the whales, the _______________can be found the farthest north. This whale has only _________________(301 - 299) teeth. In the male, one of the teeth pierces the upper lip and grows outward to form a tusk that reaches a length of about ______________(72 ÷ 8) feet. (... brainstorm a list of possible uses for the tusk.)
  7. Many people think starfish, or sea stars, always have __________________(60 ÷ 12) arms, but the number of arms varies among different species and sometimes even among individuals in a species. A ______________________ for example, may have _____________________(2 x 2 x 2) to ___________________________(600 - 587) arms. When a starfish loses an arm, it can grow a new one as long as its central disk is still intact. (Extra: Show friends and relatives a picture of a basket start and ask them what it is. Share some of the funniest guesses ... .)
 
 
 
(that's it till tomorrow folks--thanks for your patience)

Part of June's Learning for the Summer

Posted on July 27, 2014 at 11:46 PM Comments comments (30)
Hopefully, I have no interruptions because Grandma wants to give you the rest of June's learning for the summer lessons. I found out yesterday that we can leave sooner than we were planning to go see my husband's father before he passes on. He is in his ninety's and was still carrying leaves from the plants and stuff to his small herd of cattle and a few horses he had grown to and called from the field everyday. He was strong enough to walk two miles each day if not more. A very interesting person to know. He is in the villages of Mexico that my husband grew up in and was given his grandfathers ox, plow, and land at the age of seven to feed his ten brothers and sisters with. He did it for ten years. We are going there by bus because it the least expensive and safest travel around. 
However, it only leaves 3 to 4 days to type up the material Grandma wants to give you. I may be able to get a laptop to help or get my tablet working to my advantage, we will see. I will be back to start the school year again. Please take care and I wish the best for your learning.

Grandma stopped at June 7th in the Calendar History so we will pick up there for learning. I will try to get to the end of June today, July tomorrow, and August before I leave.
The birthdays for June 7 are as follows:

June 7, 1848 Paul Gauguin, French painter was born

June 7, 1917 Gwendolyn Brooks, American poet was born

The events for June 7th are as follows:

June 7, 1776 Richard Henry Lee of Virginia proposed to the Continental 
Congress a Resolution Calling for Independence of the American 
Colonies from Britain.

June 7, 1862 The United States and Britain signed A Treaty for the 
Suppression of the Slave Trade.

June 7, 1864 Abraham Lincoln was renominated for the presidency in Baltimore.

June 7, 1892 George T. Sampson invented the Clothes Dryer.

Book (1) says in "Futuristic clothes dryers-Before the clothes dryer was invented, people hung their clothes outside to dry in the air. Ask your (children) to list the benefits of this method--for example, it uses renewable solar energy and costs nothing. How do students think people of the future will dry their clothes? Have them work in groups to design a clothes dryer for the year 2020.

June 7, 1892 J.J. Doyle of the Cleveland Spiders became 
Baseball's First Pinch Hitter.

Book (1) says in "Pinch hitting for others-Discuss the term pinch hitter with your (children). Then challenge them to think of ways the term can be applied to situations outside of baseball. For example, does a substitute teacher "pinch-hit" for a classroom teacher who's ill? Ask your students to recall times when they've pinch-hit for a family member or friend. Have them write about these experiences."

June 7, 1893 George Harbo and Frank Samuelson started a Rowboat 
Trip from New York City to England, arriving on Aug.3.

June 7, 1948 Dwight Eisenhower became president of Columbia University.

June 7, 1984 A Tornado leveled the town of Barneveld, Wis.

June 7 is also Japan's day for the Rice Festival.

Book(1) says in "Rice recipes-Tell your (children) that about two-thirds of the world's population relies on rice as a staple food. A grain of rice has an outer hull, or shell, which is not eaten. Inside the hull is the kernel, which is covered by thin layers of skin called bran coats. Most of the vitamins and minerals in rice are found in the bran coats. To have your own ... rice festival, (use) some cooked brown, wild, and white rice for your (children) to taste. Which kind do they like best? Why? Invite the children to ...(think of their own favorite rice recipes to share with one another and make a booklet of them.)"


The next day is June 8th. There is only one birthday for June 8th are as follows:

June 8, 1867 Frank LLoyd Wright, American archittect

Book (1) says in Bold architecture-Frank LLoyd Wright, considered one of the world's greatest architects, designed homes and commercial buildings for more than 70 years. Among his most daring designs was "Fallingwater," a house in Pennsylvania that projects out over a waterfall. Show your students pictures of "Fallingwater" and other houses designed by Wright. Discuss how his buildings blend into the surrounding environment. Then ask the kids to describe and illustrate their dream houses, focusing in particular on the relationship of the house to surrounding natural features." ( Use Frank's Link to see his work and find out more about him. It is utterly amazing.)
(I could not get an image-I really tried)

The Events for June 8th are as follows:

June 8, 1504 Michelangelo's statue David was installed in 
front of the Palazzo della Signoria in Florence.

June 8, 1783 Laki, a volcano in southern Iceland, began erupting. 
The Eruption lasted 8 Months.

(This is a good time to review some of our common disasters that happen and what they look like.)
Book(1) says in "Climatic catastrophe-The Laki volcanic eruption of 1783 created the largest lava flow--about 220 square miles--in recorded history. (That is about half the size of Nebraska) In addition, it spedwed enormous volumes of ash and sulfurous gas into the atmosphere, producing a bluish haze that shrouded Iceland and most of northern Europe for months. Livestock deaths led to a famine that killed 10,000 Icelanders, and climatic changes were worldwide. Several years of poor harvests followed, which may or may not have resulted from the eruption. Some environmentalists believe the Laki eruption should serve as a warning to industrialized societies about the dangers of global climate change. Ask your (children) to list documented or suspected man-made changes to the world's environment (for example, ozone depletion, global warming), their causes (use of certain chemical refrigerants and aerosols; increased carbon dioxide resulting from the burning of fossil fuels), and possible remedies."

June 8, 1786 Ice Cream was first sold in the United States, in New York City.

June 8, 1789 The Bill of Rights was first proposed by James Madison.

June 8, 1835 The Largest Flower on record, a calla lily, 
bloomed at the New York Botanical Gardens. It was
 8 1/2 feet tall, 4 feet in diameter, and 12 feet in circumference.

June 8, 1869 Ives W. McGaffey received a patent for the Vacuum Cleaner.

June 8, 1939 George VI became the First British Monarch to Visit the United States.

June 8, 1963 The American Heart Association began its 
Campaign Against Cigarette Smoking.

Book (1) says in "Hazards of smoking-In recognition of the American Heart Association's fight against smoking, have your (children) make a ...list of health hazards associate with cigarettes. Post the list ...(for others)...to see.

June 8, 1982 Ronald Reagan became the First U.S. President to 
Address the British Parliament.


The next day is June 9 as follows:

June 9, 1812 Johann Galle, German astronomer, who first sighted the 
planet Neptune was born.

June 9, 1893 Cole Porter, American composer, was born.

June 9, 1961 Michael J. Fox, Canadian actor, was born.

The Events for the day are as follows:

June 9, 1790 The Philadelphia Spelling Book-became 
the First Book Registered for a U.S. Copyright.

June 9, 1877 Samuel Clemens explained the meaning of his pen name, 
Mark Twain.

June 9, 1893 Dr. Daniel Hale Williams performed the 
First Successful Open-Heart Surgery.

June 9, 1934 The Disney cartoon character Donald Duck debuted in 
The Wise Hen.

Book (1) gives this activity in "This duck's not daffy-Donald Duck was created as a foil for Mickey Mouse and made his screen debut in Walt Disney's The Wise Hen  6 years after Disney had introduced the world-famous rodent. Ask your students to imagine they're newspaper reporters interviewing Donald Duck. Then provide them with a list of interview questions, such as: How did you get parents? What happened to them? Will you and Daisy ever get married? Why do you both have the same last name? What do you do for a living? Does Daisy work? What do you think about Daffy Duck? Have the students create answers to these questions, then incorporate them into a newspaper article.

June 9, 1943 Congress authorized employers to Withhold Income 
Tax Payments from their workers' paychecks.

June 9, 1973 With a win at the Belmont Stakes, Secretariat became 
Horse Racing's First Triple Crown Winner In 25 Years.

June 9, 1983 Cabbage Patch Kids dolls made their debut.

Book (1) explains in "Dream toys-Three million Cabbage Patch Kids dolls were sold in the first year after their introduction, making them the most successful new dolls in the history of the toy industry. If possible, have a volunteer bring on of these dolls to class, and ask your (children) to speculate on why they were so popular.Then invite the children to design their own dream toys. Have each (child) write a description of the toy, the materials it would be made of, how it would operate, what kind of package it would come in, how much it would cost, and so on. Next, have the children draw and color pictures of their toys, design logos, and create names. As an extra challenge, have them create promotional slogans, jingles, or print ads."



June 10th is our next day starting with the birthdays as follows:

June 10, 1921 Prince Philip, duke of Edinburgh and husband of Queen Elizabeth II

June 10, 1928 Maurice Sendak, children's author and illustrator

The Events for the day are as Follows:

June 10, 1610 The First Dutch Settlers in America arrived on Manhattan Island.

June 10, 1682 The First Recorded Tornado struck New Haven, Conn.

June 10, 1776 The Continental Congress appointed a Drafting 
Committee for the Declaration of Independence.

Book (1) says in "Group dynamics-Tell your (children) that the drafting committee for the Declaration of Independence had several members, including Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams. However, Thomas Jefferson did the lion's share of the work. Ask your (children) to speculate why. Then have them discuss what they're like in a group. Do they let others do most of the work, or do they like to take charge? Finally, have your (children) take turns reading aloud passages from the Declaration of Independence."

June 10, 1935 Alcoholics Anonymous was founded by 
Dr. Robert Smith and William S. Wilson.

June 10, 1938 A Giant Panda named Pandora arrived at the Bronx Zoo.

Book (1) says in "Panda predicament-Giant pandas, which are native to China and Tibet, may reach 6 feet in length and weigh 220 pounds. They feed mainly on species of bamboo plants, two of which have unusual life cycles. Every 100 years, these plants produce seeds, then die. It takes several years for new plants to grow from the seeds. In the meantime, the giant pandas are without a major food source. This situation last occurred in the 1970s. And by the 1980s, about one-fourth of the giant panda population had starved to death. Have your (children) research the current status of the world panda population. How many pandas live in zoos?"

Book (57) has activities and learning to do about Pandas starting on page 173 in "Pandas at Play-Giant pandas, "hermits of the forest," once roamed over vast areas. As bamboo was cleared for farming, their range was restricted. Today they are confined to 12 reserves set aside for them by the Chinese government. These unique animals are considered a national treasure.
Read to discover: What is unique about the giant panda? Brainstorm to list everything the (children) knows about the animals. Read to separate fact from fiction and revise the list. Organize your findings and do one of the following activities.


  1. Write a short summary to tell what you think is important to know about the giant panda. Include facts, opinions, and personal reactions.
  2. Although pandas have distinct markings, the pandas can seem to disappear if they sense approaching danger. Explain how, despite their black and white fur, they can easily hide . Make a diorama to show how a giant panda's coloring serves as camouflage from enemies.
  3. A panda uses all of its senses to protect itself. Write a sense poem from the panda's point of view. I see...I hear...I smell...I taste...I feel.
  4. Where did the giant panda once live in China? Where would it be found today? Pinpoint your findings on a map.
  5. How do the following physical features:                                                                                    a. help the panda to feed on bamboo?(front paws, jaws, and teeth)                                            b. adapt to the cold climate? (fur
  6. Choose a member of the bear family to compare to the giant panda. Find out about its size, feeding habits, climbing and hunting abilities, claws, teeth, and jaws. On a Venn diagram, show how the two animals are alike and different.

The Panda Club--What dangers do the young pandas face? What are some skills a baby panda has to learn? What predators endanger the life of the young? Make a chart indicating the size and development of the young panda from birth to one year.


Bamboo--Describe the bamboo plant and the part it plays in the diet of the panda. What are the advantages and disadvantages of a diet of bamboo? Because all varieties of bamboo periodically flower and die, the giant panda, at times, is left without an adequate food supply. What is the Chinese government doing to help the panda during these times? Another problem arises when people clear the bamboo forests to farm. How will this eventually affect the panda population? What can be done to solve the problem? After thinking about the questions above, write a report about the bamboo plant and the giant panda's dependence on it. Include information, observations, and possible solutions to the problems that arise as the bamboo forests disappear.

Create and Share


  1. If a panda kept a diary of everyday occurrences, what would he or she have to say about them?
  2. How do you feel about the future of the panda? What would you do if you were a scientist studying the problem? As a zookeeper, how would you educate the public?
  3. It is a fact that pandas drink large quantities of water. Two legends have been written to explain this phenomenon. In one, the panda sees his reflection in the water. Thinking it's another panda, he drinks quickly to keep the other panda from getting its share. In the other, he is bothered by the constant running of water as melting snow feeds streams. He tries to stop the flow by drinking it.                                                                                                                             a. Use an idea from above and write the legend in your own words.                                             b. Make up your own story to explain why the panda is so thirsty."

This section on pandas is from a unit in Book (57) called Penguins, Pandas, and Zebras by Pat O'Brien. 

"Purpose:
The purpose of this unit is to study three animals--penguins, pandas, and zebras. While totally different, their common bond is their black and white coloring. To learn about their physical features, habitats, feeding habits, and care of their young, collect data from books, magazines, field trips, TV nature programs and films (listen and read). Recycle this information by organizing reports, creating displays, and sharing activities (write and speak).( I cannot get any images to save on machine for some reason right now. If you ask for a free pictures site of animals there is lots of pictures. Something is holding me back from getting them right now.)
Procedure: Sometimes reading materials will present ideas you hadn't thought of before or will make you think about something in a different way. Often it reaffirms what you already know. In order to get the most out of your reading, determine what you want to find out before you begin. List questions you want answered. They may e general (Where does it live? How big is it? What does it eat?) or more specific (Where would you expect to find an emperor penguin? Why is it necessary for the panda to eat large amounts of bamboo? What predator is most feared by the zebra?). After the materials have been read and the answers to questions located, compare the ideas and and organize the facts. Decide how you want to present your information... .

Penguins on Parade--Not all penguins think ice is nice. Eighteen species may be found from Antarctica to the equator. They swim and feed in the ocean and come to land to lay eggs and to milt.

Read to Discover: Brainstorm to find out what the class knows about penguins. After reading, separate fact from fiction. Select three or four species of penguins to study. Organize your ideas by completing the following chart.

Type of penguin




Habitat




Size




Food




Nest/eggs



  















  

  1. Use the information on the chart to write a report about one or more species of penguins.
  2. On a map, locate the areas where penguins live. Indicate which species you would find in each area.
  3. Compare the penguin with birds who are able to fly. Think how a penguin's wings, feather, bones, and body shape make it well adapted to swimming.
  4. Compile a riddle book without giving away the answers too easily. Hints about physical features, location in the southern hemisphere or peculiar nesting habits would be appropriate.
  5. Give a thumbnail sketch of one species of penguins. Tell where it lives, what it eats, and who its predators are. Draw a picture of the penguin. This may be put in a class book, displayed on the bulletin board, or used as a flashcard to review facts about the bird.
  6. Make a chart showing the average height of the various species. How do they measure up to members of the class?
  7. Classify the different species of penguin: largest to smallest; crested to not crested.
  8. Compare king and emperor (largest), or emperor and adele (both live in Antarctica).
  9. Assemble a glossary of terms. Begin with the following brooding, creche, down, krill, molt, rookery, and tobogganing. What other words could you add that are important to understand when studying penguins? Include them in your glossary.

Predators--Find answers to the following questions. Use the information to prepare a report about the penguin and its predators. What birds and animals do penguins fear the most on land and in the ocean? How does the penguin's coloring protect it from predators while it is in the water? What is the place of predators in the balance of nature?
Flightless Birds--Besides the penguin there are other flightless birds (ostrich, emu, cassowary, kiwi, and rhea). Select one to study. What is its outstanding feature? How does it adapt to its environment? How does it compare to the penguin? Write a series of cinquains to describe these birds.
The Penguin Chick--How do parents care for these young birds? What dangers do they face? How is their appearance different from adult penguins?On a time line, show the growth and development of the penguin chick from the time it hatches until it is ready to go to the sea.
Create and Share

  1. To become more familiar with the names of the various penguin groups, plan a word search you can share with your friends.
  2. Assemble a flip ook to capture a penguin walking on land or swimming in the sea.
  3. Based on what you know about penguins, write a few journal entries from the point of view of the bird, predator, or scientist.

Zebras with Zip
--While a zebra resembles a horse in many ways, it is not a horse with stripes. The domestic horse and the zebra have many things in common, but there are differences as well. In the wild, the zebra is found on the continent of Africa. There are three main species (plains, mountain, and Grevy's) with several regional types within each group.
Read to Discover: Before reading a section, determine what you already know about the three species of zebras. Organize your ideas by completing the following chart.



          
            Plains                 
          Mountain
           Grevy's
       Physical                      Features




        Habitat




   Stripe Pattern


  


  1. As you read, add to the recorded information and correct errors. Use the information on the chart to write about one species of zebra or to compare two or three types. Include an opening statement, specific information, and a personal observation.
  2. Compile a book of stripe patterns to show how the zebra differs from one type to the next. The pattern differences are best seen when viewing the animal from behind.
  3. How do the following help to protect the zebra from predators: eyes, ears, nos, feet, and legs? Using a series of verb phrases, describe how each protective feature enables the zebra to escape danger. (Eyes peer across the grassy plains searching the lengthening shadows....)
  4. How do the zebra's height, ears, mane, and hooves compare with those of a horse? Make a chart to show the differences between the domesticated horse and the zebra.
  5. The same terminaology is used to describe the horse and zebra. Define the following words: stallion, mare, colt, filly, and yearling. Use these definitions tobegin a dictionary of horse/zebra terms.

Other Zebras--Choose one or more of the following to learn about: zebra butterfly, zebra finch, zebra fish, zebrawood, or zebra plant. From your findings, compile a class book of zebras.


Create and Share



  1.  For a puzzling experiance, write a story abou a zebra using words with as many z's as possible.
  2. Write a story to explain why the zebra has stripes.
  3. Create imaginary animals by combining outstanding features of two or more animals. What would a zebra-giraffe look like? How about a leopard-zebra? Briefly describe it, tell where it lives, what it eats, and who its predators are. Give your combination animal a name. Use papier-mache to construct models of these unusual animals.

Additional Activities--

Reports

  1. Use a rubber stamp of the main character (panda, penguin, or zebra) instead of writing its name when writing a report or story. Other pictures may be added to the rebus writing.
  2. Use factual information combined with imagination to create a story about the animal of your choice.
  3. If animals could speak, what would they say? Decide on questions you would like to ask pandas, penguins, and/or zebras. How do you suppose they would respond? Write their answers for them and publish the interview.
  4. Prepare a mural. Plan what you want to include, draw appropriate pictures, and record the information you wish to share. Write a study guide that can be used to extend the understanding and appreciation of the bird or animal you chose.

Say it with Art

  1. Think of a catchy phrase to help save the animals. Use your idea to decorate a bumper sticker.
  2. Assemble calendars featuring pandas, zebras, and penguins. ... .
  3. Make a scene inside a shoe box. Cut a hole at one end to allow viewing the scene. Remove the lid and cover with tissue paper or cut a slit in the lid to admit light.
  4. Make a theme mobile. Select (at least) one of the three animals. Use pictures, drawings, interesting information, and imaginative writing.
  5. On a piece of butcher paper, design a banner. Include a drawing or photo of the animal and prose or poetry to convey the message you wish to deliver. Attach the completed work to a coat hanger to display

Travels to Another ContinentIf you could visit one of the animals in its natural habitat, where would you go? What would you want to observe?

  1. If you have a zoo nearby, take pictures of the animals in a natural setting. In the case of the zebra and penguin, include photos of other animals that would be found in the same habitat. Make a poster to display the animal groups.
  2. Pretend you are asked to prepare a recording to use at the zoo. What could you say in 45 seconds that would be informative and interesting? You would want to alert the visitor to look for certain markings and behaviors.
  3. Write a job description for each of the following members of a zoo staff; director, curator, veterinarian, keeper, other specialists.
  4. Suppose you were a member of a staff that was considering displaying penguins in your zoo. What concerns would be discussed? From what you have learned about penguins, how would you go about preparing a living space for these birds? What should be included in their diets? What substitutions might you have to make? Dramatize a meeting between the members of the staff as they consider the plan. (In place of penguins, consider the arrival of a small herd of zebra or the loan of a pair of pandas.)
  5. Write a letter to your local zoo congratulating its efforts to provide natural environments or persuading them to update their exhibits.
  6. What complaints might the birds/animals have? Write a letter on their behalf describing the problem and presenting a possible solution.

Photo Opportunities--Collect pictures of pandas, penguins, and zebras. Use them to complete the following activities.

  1. Arrange the pictures in the order needed to tell a story. Write an account of what is happening in the sequence of photos.
  2. Describe what is happening in the picture. Write a caption or factual explanation. Slip into a photo album to display.
  3. Instead of captions use speech balloons. Have the animals do the talking.
  4. Use photographs as an inspiration for poetry. Experiment with different types to find a form that best expresses your thoughts and feelings.

Something to Think.Talk About

  1. Use the following open-ended questions to formulate topics for impromptu speeches, reports, or interviews.                                                                                                                              a. How do you feel about _______________________?                                                              b. From what you know of___________________, what do you think_________________?          c. If_________________, what would happen?                                                                          d. Instead of__________________, how would you_______________________?  
  2. Today there are animals in the world who are having trouble surviving. Through your reading about the panda, zebra, or penguin, can you pinpoint the problems they are facing and begin to think about solutions? What can we do to better the situation? Make a list of problems faced by the animals. Brainstorm to arrive at ... solutions June 10, 1943 A Hungarian journalist named H. Biro patented The Ballpoint Pen.



Books


  1. Compile a book of the "Most Wanted" penguins or zebras. Include their scientific names, descriptions, (including any special features or habits), and their pictures.
  2. Put together a book of lists. List ten things:                                                                              a. to remember about a panda, penguin, or zebra.                                                                    b. to see in a bamboo forest.                                                                                                  c. to look for in the Arctic Ocean.                                                                                          d. to avoid during a safari.                                                                                                      e. to notice at the zoo.                                                                                                          f. to do with a toy panda.

Art IdeasThe following art activities may be completed using only black and white materials or by introducing another color to complement the design.

  1. Apply white crayon heavily to a sheet of black sandpaper. Transfer the design or picture to a piece of black construction paper using a warm iron.
  2. Make wrapping paper using rubber stamps and black ink on white paper.
  3. Experiment making designs with black ink, paint, crayon, marker, etc. on different sizes of white paper. Use the art as book covers, place mats, or wrapping paper.
  4. Make your own note paper using simplified designs of the panda, penguin, or zebra.
  5. A silhouette is an outline of an object, filled in with black. Make a silhouette of one of the animals studied in the unit.
  6. make refrigerator magnets using homemade craft clay. Roll out the clay, cut around a pattern, paint when dry, and fasten magnetic tape to the back.
  7. Construct a loom using a foam tray with the center removed. Use a variety of simple weaving techniques to create a design with yarn.
  8. 8. Weave with paper to come up with some unusual patterns. Cut the strips straight, wavy, zigzagged, or combine the three.
  9. Make a mosaic using rice to create a representational picture of abstract design. Dye some of the rice black.
  10. Use want ads as a background for a crayon or painted picture."


June 10, 1944 Cincinnati's Joe Nuxhall became Major League 
Baseball's Youngest Player Ever, at 15 years, 10 months, 11 days.

Book (1) says in "Youthful hurler-During World War II, major league baseball teams scrambled to replace their regular players, many of whom were overseas, with any available talent. So it was that Cincinnati pitcher Joe Nuxhall broke into the league before his 16th birthday. To mark this event, have your (children) write a fantasy story about their debut--at their current age--in a favorite professional sport or other career."

June 10, 1963 The Equal Pay Act, prohibiting wage discrimination 
because of sex, was enacted.


June 11 breaks into the month with a Hawaiian celebration and introduces things about the Ocean/
It has 6 birthdays as follows:

June 11, 1758 Kamehameha I, Polynesian king who unified the Hawaiian Islands was born.

Therefore it is considered King Kamehameha Day in (Hawaii).
Book (1) tells about the "Hawaiian celebration-Tell your (children) that King Kamehameha I united Hawaii's small quareling island kingdoms into one strong and peaceful nation. To honor him, Hawaiians hold parades and luaus. Hold a Hawaiian-style celebration in your own (home). Ask your students to wear colorful shirts or muumuu-like dresses. Make leis out of tissue paper or cutout flowers. Then, with a tablecloth spread on the floor, feast papayas), plus macadamia nuts and punch."

Book (57) has a section called ""Aloha" Party--by Tania K Cowling
 "Aloha" means love. The Hawaiian people use this word to say "hello" and "good-bye." Here are a few party ideas to turn your (home) into a festive Hawaiian luau.

Create Your Island
Decorate the (house) with real or construction-paper palm leaves, flowers, sea shells, pineapples, balloons, and tropical fish.

Hanging Fish
Cut fish of different shapes out of posterboard. Paint both sides of the fish with bright colors and patterns. Punch a hole at the top and thread with ribbon or yarn. Hang fish around the room from the ceiling and doorways.

Hawaiian Leis
(I believe you can find some ways to make the flowers on you tube, just look under tissue paper flowers for leis.)Make a flower lei for each (person)... to wear at the party. Leis represent "aloha spirit," which expresses love and friendship. Cut a simple flower shape from different colors construction paper. Punch a hole in the center of each flower. String the flowers onto yarn necklaces, using cut-up  straws as spacers. Colorful tissue paper or crepe paper can also be used for flowers.

Prepare the Food

Fruity Salad
2 melons, cut into chunks (cantaloupe and honeydew)
2 large cans chunk pineapple with juice
2 jars red maraschino cherries with syrup
Green seedless grapes
Sliced bananas
Mix all the fruit together and chill. Serve the fruit in paper cups. Include a colorful cocktail toothpick to spear the fruit.

Jaws of Jell-O® into the "jaw" shells and chill till firm. Sprinkle with shredded coconut and serve.

Plantation Punch
Mix pineapple juice with ginger ale. Freeze the orange sections saved from the orange "jaws" in water for fancy ice cubes. Add these cubes to chill the punch.

Snack Bowl
Pour goldfish crackers and gummy fish into a clear fish bowl. Use this as a colorful enterpiece for your luau table and scoop out a snack for each student.

Play Some Games

Dance
Play Hawaiian music. Make hula skirts using brown butcher paper, measure a piece to fit around each child like a skirt. Cut fringe from the bottom up to mid-hip. Tape or staple the skirt to fit around the waist. Invite students to be hula dancers and tell stories of nature using hand movements and swaying hips.
Grab a bamboo stick or even an old broom handle and do the "Limbo." Have students attempt to go under the limbo stick as it is moved closer to the floor.

Relay of the Sea
Divide the class into teams and designate a finish line. Have each student in line move across the room using "sea animal" movements. For example, the first child in line goes across like a jaw-opening shark, the second child is a wobbling jellyfish, third in line crawls sideways like a crab, and so forth. Make up enough movements for each student on the relay team. The first team to complete all the movements wins the relay.

Pin the Palm Tree on Hawaii
Tape a world map on the wall. Make small construction-paper palm trees and attach a piece of tape on the back. Blindfold students and head them in the direction of the map. Whoever tapes a palm tree closest to Hawaii wins the game.

Hawaiian Word Game(This can be played on a colorful flier paper.)
The Hawaiian alphabet consists of the following letters. See how many English words you can make out of these letters.

a        e       i      o      u      h      k    

4th day of Summer Classes

Posted on July 22, 2014 at 12:42 AM Comments comments (18)
Hello Folks:
 
June 6 is our next Calendar Date to present for learning this summer. The birthdays are given as follows:
 
1755 Nathan Hale, American patriot hanged by the British as a spy
 
1911 Verna AArdema, children's author
 
Book (1)says in "Animal ways-Celebrate Verna Aardem's birthday by reading aloud Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears. Then invite the children to create their own stories explaining why other kinds of animals behave the way they do. Have them illustrate their work.
 
This leads us into the study of insects and animals of Book (57) starting with Wildlife Wonders by Teddy Meister. Teddy says, "The study of wildlife is called zoology. It involves knowing about all living creatures from the smallest to the largest on land and in the sea.
Learning by Attributes
In order to organize information about wildlife, scientists categorize them by certain attributes or characteristics:
 
Body Forms
    vertebrate (having a spinal column
     invertebrate (no spinal column)
 
Body Temperatures
     warm-blooded or homoiothermic (temp. remains constant)
     cold-blooded or poikilothermic (temp. adapts to environment)
 
Food Sources
      herbivore (plant eater)
      carnivore (meat eater)
      omnivore (plant and meat eater)
 
Divide your paper into seven columns using the traits of the three major attributes as headings. List animals under each heading that have that characteristic.
How would you test a new species that has just been discovered? Set up a plan you might use. Draw pictures of this new creature. Explain its unusual features and habits. Label the body parts and describe which of the attributes might fit it best.
We have learned many things from the animal world. For example, we have learned about radar from bats. What are some other things we have learned? Find out about sonar and dolphins or how hibernation could affect the possibilities for people to some day take long trips into space. Prepare a talk for your class about your findings.
 
Animal Behavior
Can animals remember things? Can they think? Do they communicate with each other? Did you ever wish that an animal could talk with you? Suppose a favorite pet could actually talk! What kinds of questions would you want to ask?
 
Sorting Some More
Animals can also be categorized by phylum, or type, such as mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and marsupials. Fill in each box by listing an animal and describing why it can be categorized in this way.
 
Mammal                                                         
 
 
 
Reptile
Amphibian 
 
 
                                                      
  Marsupial
 
 
Unusual Animals from A to Z
There are unusual animals to fit every letter of the alphabet, and then some! How many can you find? Use this list as a starter. When it is finished, create an animal alphabet book for young children.
 
A___________________  B______________________C____________________D_________________
 
E___________________  F______________________ G____________________H_________________
 
I____________________  J______________________ K____________________ L_________________
 
M___________________  N______________________ O___________________ P_________________
 
Q___________________  R______________________  S___________________T_________________
 
U___________________  V______________________ W___________________ X_________________
 
Y___________________  Z______________________
 
(In drawing a picture on a page with a plate having the words Food Type:, a page holding the outline Description:; coloring:; body form:; body temperature:; height:; weight:; unusual habits: listed in it, and a heart holding As a pet this animal would need:___________________________________________on one side; the other side a house with Home or Habitat:; a global compass marked with N,E,S,W having Found in: on the side of it; then a rectangular cloud saying This animals is interesting because:____
___________________________________________________________________________________
and Man needs this animal because: ____________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________________)
 
Fact Finding (is what it is called saying)
Use the outline form to research an animal you want to learn more about. (Look over your A-to-Z list and select one about which you know nothing.)
 
My animal is____________________________________________(on the top)
 
(Book (57) goes on to say,)
Endangered/Extinct
Save our wildlife! Take care of endangered species! This is something we hear all the time. What is the difference between endangered and extinct? Use encyclopedias or the dictionary to find the difference between these two terms. Sometimes an animal on the endangered list can be saved. The Florida alligator is an example of this.
 
Save Our Wildlife
Many animals could out-do humans if we were to have an Olympic contest with them! They are just like Olympic athletes in their special abilities. Can you think of any Olympic competitors to match against a list of animal entries? Use the Guinness Book of Olympic Records to do this.
 
Who Am I?
Create riddles about animals. For example: I have a huge mouth and am known as "the rider horse." I usually weigh a mere 8,000 pounds but bet I can run faster than you! (Answer: hippopotamus.)
 
Animal Pictures
Some animal names make us think of unusual pictures of how they might look. Draw pictures of what the following names make you think of. Use your imagination! Can you find out how each received its peculiar name?
            prairie dog                 bullfrog                  sea lion
            hedgehog                  tiger shark              spider monkey
 
Who's Who
In this activity you will have an opportunity to find out about some of the great people involved with furthering our knowledge about animals. Set up a card file for some mini-research. Find out what each person did by summarizing the information in short paragraphs.
           J.J. Audubon                        Charles Darwin
           Thomas Huxley                     Clinton Merriam
           Rachel Carson                      William Henry Hudson
           Jane Goodall                         Carolus Linnaeus
 
Careers, Careers, Careers
What do the following careers have in common with animals?
               anthropology                             veterinary science
               entomology                               biology
               naturalist                                   vertebrate zoology
               bacteriology
Look through the yellow pages of a telephone directory. Perhaps one of these career areas is listed with a contact person and phone number. Set up a time and date with your ()parents. Call the person listed in the phone book and invite him or her to be a guest speaker for the (family). Be sure to send a thank you note after the visit!
 
It's the Law
The United States Congress passed the endangered Species Act that protects rare plants and animals. This legislation has provided the Secretary of the Interior with the authority to identify threatened or endangered species in new locations. What new laws have been passed in your state? Use the phone book to find the addresses of wildlife and conservation agencies in your state. Write and ask about laws and the animals affected by legislation. Share the information with your (family.)
 
Going, Going, Gone
During the last 2,000 years the world has lost 106 species--two-thirds of these since the mid-19th century,and most since the beginning of the 20th century. How can we stop this alarming rate of extinction? What do children and adults need to do? Does the "Golden Rule" apply to animals as well as people? Talk to parents, neighbors, and (others) about what can be done. Keep a list of suggestions they make. Create a series of new broadcasts you could present to your (family) over a period of time. Ask (others) to help.
 
What Are We Doing?
Many programs are now underway for better wildlife conservation. These include government controls, establishing wildlife sanctuaries, controlling hunting limits and seasons, and restoring and replacing habitats. Do some research about each of these. Find out what is being done in your area. Present a "status report" to your (family). Provide good visual aids to accompany your presentations.
 
IUPN
The International Union for the Protection of Nature began in 1943 with the participation of 33 nations. It was a way to coordinate wildlife protection efforts and share information globally. How did this historic meeting lead to other similar organizations? Find out about IUPN and IUCN. Start a wildlife club at your (church, community, or neighborhood.). Identify club goals and activities. Think of a club name. You might want to design club membership cards and T-shirts.
 
Talk Topics
Gather a group of (people) interested in wildlife conservation and ask each member to thoroughly research a wildlife topic of his or her choice. Practice presenting research findings during free class time ...(Arrange yourselves as "traveling speakers" to other children, adults, groups, and places) Get the word out!
 
Animal Collage
Cut out animal pictures from magazines to create a collage. Begin from the center of the paper. Overlap each of the pictures so that the whole collage is connected to the center. Think of a name for the collage. Display it on (various walls in places.)
 
Nursery Rhymes
Many nursery rhymes you might have learned as a very young child, such as Ding, Dong, Bell; Baa, Baa, Black Sheep; and Mary Had a Little Lamb involved animals. Create a nursery rhyme of your own involving an unusual animal.
 
Animals in Literature
Many of children's favorite stories are about animals. Plan a trip to the library and see how many you can gather for a (family)  reading. Make up a bibliography for your (family). Here is a list to get you started.
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
Paddington Bear by Michael Bond
The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
Charlotte's Web by E.B. White
Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig
Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
Call of the Wild by Jack London
 
                                               Trivia Task---Animal IQ
How many of the trivia tasks can you complete in 15 minutes?.....Have a race to see who has the highest "animal IQ." (Hint: Some of these you might know from earlier activities!)
 
  1. Things we wear that come from animals____________________________________________
  2. Something animals have that humans do not________________________________________
  3. Three things we eat that come from animals_________________________________________
  4. Two kinds of animal habitats______________________________________________________
  5. Animals that provide transportation_________________________________________________
  6. Animals you see every day_______________________________________________________
  7. Animals that are mascots in your area______________________________________________
  8. Animals that symbolize various athletic teams________________________________________
  9. Animal TV "stars"_______________________________________________________________
  10. Animal movie "stars"_____________________________________________________________
  11. Literature based on animals who act and think like humans______________________________
  12. Animals symbolic of certain products we buy_________________________________________
  13. Animals as the main characters in comic strips_______________________________________
  14. Animals symbolic of shoes and clothing we wear______________________________________
  15. The study of animals is called______________________________________________________
  16. Three types of animal food sources__________________________________________________
  17. The classification given to warm-blooded animals_______________________________________
  18. The classification given to cold-blooded animals________________________________________
  19. The meaning of extinction__________________________________________________________
  20. The meaning of marsupial__________________________________________________________
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 "Children" and Their Groups
 
Find out the names of animal groups and what their offspring are called. Some have been filled in to help you. When you complete your research, set up a word search puzzle for (the family and others).
 
        Animal                             Offspring                             Group Name
         cow                                  calf                                        herd
         kangaroo                           joey                                      troop
         whale                                calf                                         pod
         horse                                 foal                                     _________
         wolf                                 ___________                            pack
         beaver                                kit                                       _________
          goat                                  kid                                       _________
          goose                              ___________                          gaggle
          sheep                               lamb                                     __________
          rabbit                                bunny                                   ___________
 
Grandma will return to the Calendar History. She will give a little more each day from Book (57). There is lots about animals. She has still more from Book (57) to go with the Calendar History activities but this is it on the animals today. We were still working on June 6th birthdays as follows:
 
1927 Peter Spier, children's author and illustrator
 
1954 Cynthia Rylant, children's author
 
Events for June 6 are as follows:
 
1822 Ten Inches of Snow fell in New England on this day in late spring.
 
Book (1) says in "Spring snowstorms-Ask your (children) to imagine how New Englanders might have felt when they received 10 inches of snow on this date in 1822. Then have the kids create "what's wrong with this picture?" illustrations depicting a snowy summer day. For example, they might draw a beach scene depicting people in swimsuits along with hats, mittens, and boots."
 
1933 The First Drive-in Movie Theater opened in Camden, N.J.
 
1939 The First Little League game was played in Williamsport, Pa.
 
1944 Massive Allied landings on the beaches of Normandy, France,
 marked the D-DAY invasion of Nazi-held Western Europe.
 
1985 Scientists at the University of California confirmed the presence
of a huge black hole at the center of the Milky Way.
 
June 6 is also National Yo-Yo Day
 
Book (1) says in "Yo-yo tricks-In honor of National Yo-Yo Day, invite your students to bring in their yo-yos and demonstrate tricks they can do. For an extra challenge, have the children write and illustrate the different steps involved.
 
It is also National Safe Boating Week (first week in June)
Book (1) says in "Rules for safe sports-Tell your (children) that National Safe Boating Week is a reminder for them to follow safety precautions when they're in boats. Then ask them to follow safety precautions when they're in boats. Then ask the kids to list other summer activities they plan to enjoy--for example, swimming, tennis, baseball, baking, horseback riding. Have the students brainstorm for safety rules that are important for each of their safe-sports rules. Display the posters... .
 
Book (57) uses LifeSavers to help teach safety and colors to younger children. This Unit is called "Be a LifeSaver by Lisa Crooks.
 
Introduction
Kids love to eat LifeSavorsª and they'll love the following activities even more. This unit on LifeSaversª can also be used as a spring-board for reinforcing basic safety rules.
  1. LifeSaversª can provide a hands-on experience for teaching fractions and parts. If you have ten LifeSaversª on the table and five are eaten, how many are left? What fraction is left? Can this be reduced?
  2. Plan a trip to the LifeSaversª factory. Starting from your state, what states would you pass through to get there? What kinds of transportation could you use? What would be the cost of using various types of transportation? How much would the entire trip cost if you were to include transportation, food, and lodging? This activity could be expanded, depending on the level of students.
  3. Candy is made in an assembly line. In (your home or somewhere) set up an assembly line to prepare a no-bake cookie or candy. Each (child) could be responsible for a specific duty. Discuss what would happen if one of the links in the assembly line broke down.
  4. Have the (children) design a LifeSaversª or other type of candy factory. They would need to explain the different machines that would be used in their factory and prepare a map showing where these machines are located in the plant.
  5. Using similar brands of hard candies, invite (family members or others) to join in a taste test to determine whether Candy A or Candy B is preferred." Following are some math problems from Grandma's Book (7) called Candy Shop with Multiplication skills through 5 x 5 with addition. The children must have a paper each. "Several friends bought some candy. Listen carefully to this information so you can tell how much money each person spent. You will want to write down some of the information I am giving you. First you need to know the price of different kinds of candy. Suckers are 5 cents each. Gum is 3 cents a piece. Jelly beans are 2 cents each. (Repeat prices or write them (down)) Now figure out how much each child spent on candy. Number your paper from 1 to 10. On each line write the child's name (don't worry about spelling) and the price he paid.       !.  Tasha bought 3 pieces of gum. By number 1 write her name and the price she paid           (Repeat this part of the directions as necessary throughout the lesson.)                      
            2. Gary bought 3 jelly beans and 1 sucker.
            3. Ann bought 1 sucker, 1 piece of gum and 1 jelly bean. 
          . 4.Lee bought 5 suckers.
            5. Amy bought 4 jelly beans plus 1 sucker.                                                                                   6. Omar bought 3 pieces of gum plus 1 jelly bean.
            7. Ed bought 2 pieces of each kind of candy.
            8. Jill bought 3 suckers and 1 jelly bean.
            9. Rob bought 4 pieces of gum and 1 sucker.
           10. Circle the name of the person who spent the most.
           11. Underline the name of the person who spent the least.
           12. Write your name on the top of your page."
(Now we are going back to Book (57) on LifeSaversª)
 6. What happens after you chew a LifeSaversª candy? Students could map the process 
     of digestion and label on a blank tongues which areas pick up sweet, salty, sour,
     bitter, and no taste.
 7.  Invite (a) nurse to discuss first aid and basic safety.
 8. Invite a police officer to demonstrate safety while walking, riding bikes, being
     around animals, and riding on a bus or in a car.
 9. Invite a police officer to do a bicycle inspection. .
10. Invite (a) dietitian to discuss good eating habits and the importance of a good
      diet.
11. Have relay races by moving a LiffeSaversª candy across the floor using a straw
      in the mouth.
12. Make LifeSaversª necklaces.
13. Using paper, crayons, glue, and LifeSaversª, make designs of people and animals.
14. Have a safety poster contest. Each (child) must pick a safety rule to illustrate.
15. To reinforce safety rules, read examples of (childrens) behaviors and have students
      respond by holding up a red "not safe" card or a green "safe" card.
 
 
Lifesaver Science Estimation
Estimate--guess
Dissolve--disappear from sight: melt away
 
We are going to estimate how long it will take for a LifeSaversª candy to dissolve and disappear. We will use two different kinds of water--warm and cool.
 
  1. In which water temperature do you think the candy will dissolve first?________________
       Explain.______________________________________________________________________
        _____________________________________________________________________________
        ______________________________________________________________________________  
 2. I estimate that the candy in warm water will dissolve in ______hour(s)______minutes.
 3. I estimate that the candy in cool water will dissolve in ______hour(s)______minutes.
 4. Which candy dissolved first?_______________________________________________________
     How long did it take?______hour(s)______minute(s)
     Which candy dissolved second?____________________________________________________
     How long did it take?______hour(s)______minute(s)
     Was your estimation correct?________
 
Lifesaver Math
 
________Each LifeSaversª candy has ten calories. You ate three LifeSaversª. How many
              calories did you eat?
 
________You ate five LifeSaversª. How many calories did you eat?
 
 
_________A roll of LifeSaversª has eleven candies in it. You ate three. How many are left?
 
 
_________You are hungry and eat two more LifeSaversª. How many are left?
 
 
_________The next day you eat five more candies. How many are left?
 
 
_________A roll of LifeSaversª costs 40 cents. How much money would it cost to buy two rolls?
 
 
_________How much more would it cost for four rolls?
 
 
Lifesaver Opposites
Fill in the blanks with the opposite of the word that is in bold print.
 
LifeSaversª are hard, not_____________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are round, not_____________________________________.
 
LifeªSaversª are ___________________________, not sour.
 
LifeSaversª are an______________________invention, not a new one.
 
LifeSaversª are_________________________, not bad.
 
 
Lifesaver Similes
After a ...discussion on similes, fill in the blanks with a proper simile.
 
LifeSaversª are as hard as________________________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are as round as______________________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are as sweet as______________________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are as old as_______________________________________________________.
 
LifeSaversª are as good as_________________________________________________________.
 
 
A Rainbow of Colors!
Assorted LifeSaversª come in four bright colors--red, orange, yellow, and green. Under each color, list things that belong in that category.
 
Things That Are Red
 
 
 
 
 
Things That Are Green
 
 
 
 
 
Things That Are Yellow
 
 
 
 
 
Things That Are Orange
 
 
 
 
 
(Grandma's Book (7) has some math problems using colors as follows:)
 
Colored Products
(Use a page with 110 squares on it and the instructions say you will not use the bottom 60)
1. With a black crayon, color the square that has the answer to 2 X 7.
 2. Use a red crayon to color the square that has the answer to 4 X 6.
 3. Use a yellow crayon to color the square that has the answer to 7 X 7.
 4. Use a green crayon to circle the answer to 5 X 7.
 5. Use a blue crayon to underline the answer to 6 X 6.
 6. Put a brown X on the answer to 4 X 7.
 7. Put a red X on the answer to 4 X 4.
 8. Put a black circle around the answer to 3 X 7.
 9. Put a yellow circle around the answer to 6 X 5.
10. Use a green crayon to underline the answer to 3 X 6.
11. Use a red crayon to underline the answer to 4 X 5.
12. Put a green X on the answer to 3 X 4.
13. Put a blue circle around the answer to 6 X 7.
14. Use a brown crayon to underline the answer to 2 X 6.
15. Put your name in the upper right-hand corner.
 
(Now We Will Finish up the Unit  on LifeSaversª, read the information on the label and answer the following questions.)
 
Read the Label
What is the name of this candy?______________________________________________________
 
How many flavors are in this roll?_______________________________________________________
 
How many candies are in this roll?______________________________________________________
 
How many ounces does it weigh?________________________________________________________
 
Oz, means_____________________________________________________________
 
How many calories are in each piece?________________________________________________
 
Name four colors found in a roll of the candies:
 
   ________________________________           _____________________________________
 
  ________________________________            ______________________________________
 
Name the ingredients:
 
     S_________R, C______________, S_____________________P
 
Artificial C______________S
 
Where Are Lifesaversª Made?
 
  1. Look on your roll of LifeSaversª. Where were they made?___________________________
  2. Is the factory north, south, east, or west of your state?____________________________
  3. LifeSaversª are made in the state of ___________________________________________
  4. Which color candy is your favorite?____________________________________________
  5. On a United States map, use your favorite color to color in the state where the factory is. If you were to travel to the factory, what states would you travel through?
 
 
 
 
 
(Grandma is going to finish the unit tomorrow.)
 
 
 

Day 3 of Summer Lessons

Posted on July 21, 2014 at 4:19 AM Comments comments (25)
Dear Folks:
 
June's Project of the Month is Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Chart. Grandma is going to ask you to
 do it a little different than what Book (1) has asked for it.
Grandma wants the children to think of all kinds of Fruits and Vegetables to list on a chart. Then
I want them to record which ones are the favorites of each person in your family. Then I want them
to record the ones each of you dislike the most. Then I want to find out about each one that is:
what they do for the body, the calories, the nutrients it has, and anything else important about them.
I want them to research about cancer and how fruits and vegetables help them from getting cancer.
Then I want them to research about Monsanto and GMO's and how they are bad for the insects and
could be for you. Then I want them to research about Organic growing and how it works and why 
people are doing it and the many ways how.
 
June's Month long Observances are as follows:
Accordion Awareness Month
American Rivers Month
Arts and Crafts Month
Carnival and Circus Month
Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month
National Adopt-a-Cat Month
National Cheeseburger Month
National Dairy Month
National Recycling Month
National Rose Month
National Theater Month
Papaya Month
Tennis Month
Zoo and Aquarium Month
 
Week long Events
International Volunteers Week (first week)
National Safe Boating Week (first week)
Teacher Thank You Week (first week)
National Little League Baseball Week (week beginning with the second Monday)
National Flag Week (week including June 14)
National Physical Therapy Week (third week)
Amateur Radio Week (week ending with the fourth weekend)
 
Special Days and Celebrations
Flag Day (June 14)
Father's Day (third Sunday)
First day of summer (on or about June 22)
 
June 1 has 3 birthdays as follows:
 
1637 Jacques Marquette, French Jesuit missionary and explorer
 
1849 Francis Edgar Stanley, inventor of the first successful
steam-driven automobile
 
Oscar the Grouch, "Sesame Street character
 
Book (1) has an activity for this called "Have a grouchy birthday-Young children will enjoy
celebrating Oscar the Grouch's birthday by brainstorming for yucky things--for example, muddy
shoes, liver and onion sandwiches, or hair tangled with bubble gum. List your childrens' ideas on
the chalkboard, then have the children use the list their poems on construction-paper trash cans.
 
Next are the Events for June 1 as follows:
 
1792 Kentucky became the 15th state.
 
1796 Tennessee became the 16th state.
 
1802 The first Book Fair took place in New York City.
 
1813 Mortally wounded in a War of 1812 naval engagement,
 Captain James Lawrence told his crew,"Don't Give Up the Ship,"
which became the motto of the U.S. Navy.
 
1925 New York Yankees star Lou Gehrig began his record string of
Playing in 2,130 Consecutive Baseball Games.
 
1938 The first issue of the "Superman" Action Comics appeared.
 
Book (1) has the following activity to go with it called "Signs of a superhero-In honor of
Superman's comic-book debut, ask your (children) to write a paragraph about where they first
discovered this superhero (for example, on TV, in motion pictures, or on videos) and to briefly
describe him. Then have the kids interview parents and grandparents about their memories of
Superman. How do these views compare with those of your (children)? Finally, make a ...list of
a superhero's positive qualities. Can your (children) name real people who also display these
qualities?"
 
1990 Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev and U.S. president George Bush
Signed More than a Dozen Agreements at the White House.
 
June 1 is also
Children's Day in (Germany)
International Mother's Peace Day
International Volumteers Week (first week in June)
Book (1) says in "Student volunteers-During International Volunteers Week, challenge your
(children) to name volunteer jobs they could do at home, ... and in the community. Encourage
them to each do at least one volunteer activity this week, then report back to the family.
 
June 2 has three birthdays as follows:
 
1914 Paul Galdone, children's author
 
Book (1) says in "Adaptable tales-Tell your (children) that Paul Galdone drew great satisfaction
from adapting favorite old tales to a picture-book format. Invite the kids to name familiar fairy
tales, fables, and tall tales they enjoy. Then have them work ... to adapt and illustrate one of
these stories. Arrange for (them) to share their work with (others)"
 
1929 Norton Juster, children's author who wrote The Phantom Tollbooth
 
1934 Anita Lobel, children's author and illustrator
 
June 2 Events are as follows:
 
1883 The first Night Baseball Game took place in Forth Wayne, Ind.
 
1886 Grover Cleveland became the First President to Get Married
in the White House.
 
1896 The Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi received a patent for
Electromagnetic Wave Broadcasting, the basis of radio and television. 
 
Book(1) says in "Forms of Government- On the anniversary of Italy's governmental referendum,
have your (children) compare and contrast a republican form of government with a monarchy.
What are the strengths and weaknesses of each system? Would any of your (children) prefer a
monarchy under any circumstances? Why or why not?"
 
1924 Congress granted Citizenship to All American Indians.
 
1946 In a referendum, Italy Chose a Republican Form of Government
over a return to the monarchy.
 
1949 Five different players on the Philadelphia Phillies baseball team
hit 8th-Inning Home Runs.
 
1966 The U. S. spacecraft Surveyor 1 landed on the moon and began
to relay the First Close-Up Pictures of the Lunar Surface.
 
June 2 is also Teacher Tank You Week (first week in June)
Book (1) also states in "Time for thank-yous-During Teacher Thank You Week, invite your
students to write short notes to their former teachers, thanking them for some special kindness
or memorable contribution. Arrange to deliver the notes throughout the week as a special way
to celebrate the important role teachers play in children's lives." (Considering you may have
only been their only teacher, have them carry this out for you--You definitely deserve it. It takes
a lot for you to give up your time and carry out the task of teaching your own children.)
 
 
June 3 only has two birthdays as follows:
 
1808 Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate states
 
1904 Charles Drew, American surgeon who developed techniques
for processing and storing blood plasm for use in transfusions.
 
 
Events for June 3 are as follows:
 
1851 The New York Knickerbockers wore The First Baseball Uniforms.
 
1888 The poem "Casey at the Bat" first appeared in print.
 
1932 Lou Gehrig became the First Major Leaguer to
Hit Four Consecutive Homers in one game.
 
1937 After renouncing the British throne, the Duke of Windsor
married Mrs. Wallis Simpson.
 
1948 The World's Largest Telescope--a 200-inch reflector--was
dedicated at Mount Palomar Observatory in California.
 
1949 Wesley A. Brown became the First African-American to
Graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis.
 
1965 Major Edward H. White took the First Space Walk by an American.
 
1965 Silver was Eliminated from U.S. dimes and quarters.
 
 
June 3 is also Broken Dolls Day in (Japan). Book (1) says in "A day for dolls-On Broken
Dolls Day in Japan, young girls and their mothers bring broken dolls to Buddhist priests to
be enshrined. Ask your (children) to bring in their broken dolls or action figures. Then set
up a ...repair station where (the children) can apply a little glue and a lot of ingenuity to fix
the dolls. Also invite the children to use extra parts to create new dolls. Afterward, have them
write stories or poems about the dolls. ...
June 3 is also used by Book (1) to extend the monthly lesson on fruits and vegetables in
asking the children "to celebrate Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Month, (challenging them) to
create a still-life arrangement out of fruits and vegetables. Then have the kids use watercolors,
charcoal, pen and ink, or colored pencils to depict their arrangements. Ask the (children) to
make up fact sheets that list the artwork's title as well as the foods represented and their
nutritional benefits. ..."
 
Only one birthday for June 4th as follows:
 
1738 George III, English king who reigned during the American Revolution
 
The Events for June 4th are as follows:
 
1070 Roquefort Cheese was first discovered in a cave in France.
 
Book(1) writes about it in "Moldy Meal-According to legend, in 1070 a shepherd boy
accidentally left his lunch--bread and sheep's milk cheese-in a cool limestone cave near
Roquefort, France. He returned to the cave weeks later and found the lost food covered
with black mod. He ate it anyway. The bread had a bad taste. The cheese looked peculiar
but tasted good. To this day, cheese made of sheep's milk ages in those same limestone
caverns. Bring in some Roquefort cheese and invite your (children) to sample it. Can they
name other foods in which bacteria is an essential ingredient? (Such foods include yogurt,
sour cream, and other kinds of cheeses.)"
 
1787 Delegates to the Constitutional Convention approved the
idea of a Single Chief Executive to Govern the Nation.
 
1896 Henry Ford successfully test drove the First Ford Car.
 
1929 Illinois selected the Cardinal to be its state bird.
 
Book (1) says in "State symbols-Many states have state birds. Challenge your (children to
find out if their state has one and if so, what it is. What other things--flowers, insects, trees,
songs--are recognized by their state? Invite the kids to select another symbol they think
merits recognition, then write a proposal to their state representative."
 
1937 Sylvan N. Goldman began supplying Grocery Carts to his
Oklahoma City supermarket customers.
 
Book (1) writes in "Checkout challenge-If there were no grocery carts, how would people get
their groceries to the checkout counter? Challenge your (children) to work ...to invent a new
way to transport groceries. Have the (children) illustrate their inventions, Then explain how
their devices would work."
 
1957 The First National Wheelchair Games were held on Long Island in New York.
 
1984 University of California scientists announced that they had
successfully cloned cells from the skin of a guagga, a zebra like
African mammal extinct for more than 100 years.
 
1989 Chinese soldiers broke up an extended, student-led pro democracy
demonstration in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. The deaths were believed
to number in the thousands.
 
 
June 5th has three birthdays as follows:
 
1718 Thomas Chippendale, English cabinetmaker
 
1723 Adam Smith, Scottish political philosopher who helped
lay the intellectual foundations of capitalism.
 
1919 Richard Scarry, children's author and illustrator
 
The Events for June 5 are as follows:
 
1783 Joseph and Jacques Montgolfier first demonstrated their
Hot-Air Balloon in a 10-minute, unmanned flight over Annoney, France.
 
Book (1) says in "Awe-inspiring flight--The balloon created by Joseph and Jacques Montgolfier
measured over 35 feet in diameter. It was made from paper-lined sections of linen, which were
joined together with buttons. Hot air for the balloon came from wood burned in a hole in the
ground. The balloon was held over the hole by eight men. When it was released, it rose 6,000
feet and traveled 1 1/2 miles before coming down. Remind your (children) that this flight took
place over 200 years ago. Then ask them to imagine what people viewing this spectacle might
have been thinking. Were they afraid? Excited? have your (children) write stories about the
balloon flight from the perspective of a long-ago spectator."
 
1876 Bananas were sold for 10¢ each at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition
Before then, the fruit had rarely been seen in the United States.
 
Book (1) states in "Banana Bonanza-Tell your (children) that bananas contain important
nutrients, such as potassium, carbohydrates, and vitamins A,B, and C. Ask the children
to describe the ways they like to eat bananas. Then have them create posters encouraging
people to eat more of this healthful fruit.
 
Book (57) of Grandma's has a section called "Going Bananas by Gail K Lennon" in which 
it states the following: "The activities outlined in this unit can be set up as centers in an
integrated, activity-based theme on bananas. The study begins with a whole-group orientation
activity. This allows (the children) to share what they already know about the theme. It also
builds interest and motivation for the study.
The learning objectives for the theme on bananas are as follows:
  • to practice listening, reading, writing, speaking, viewing, and presenting skills
  • to discover more about everyday things and how these relate to our life
  • to increase cooperative skills through working together
  • to improve writing and research skills
  • to nurture students' talents in the various areas of the arts
 
Before (the children) begin their work ..., (they should) overview the topic and to provide motivation
for the unit ahead. You might want to share a short film on banana growing (Growing Bananas),
 taste a banana dish, and find out what (the children) already know about bananas.
Some of the facts they may already know include:
  • Bananas are good for you
  • Bananas are grown in tropical climates.
  • Bananas grow in large bunches, and they grow up, not down.
  • Bananas grow on palm trees.
  • Bananas form the basis for some tropical diets.
  • Bananas can sometimes be used as a substitute for other foods which are difficult to
     digest such as dairy products."
The children may have to move from different centers or areas of the home to carry out the
work of this unit. Be willing to observe, clarify material, give encouragement and direction to
lead the children on on with their learning and help all you can.
 
Center 1:How do they Grow? Upon watch the video answer the following questions
Appendix A: Study Outline
Banana Growing Locations:
1.
2.
3.
Climate Conditions Necessary for Growing:
1.
2.
3
4.
5.
Banana Markets:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
New Banana Types:
1.
2.
Plantation Jobs:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Problems involved in Banana Growing:
1.
2.
3.
 
 
Then have them work...to discuss and reach a consensus on the best way to show what
they have learned about growing bananas. You may want to provide a list of methods for
them to use....At the center children could select from...murals,accordion books, big books,
poetry,plays, comic strips, charts, and diagrams.
 
Center 2: Banana Extravaganza
Provide cookbooks and other materials for 9the children) to use to create a collection of
banana recipes. They can create a big book in which they each write a recipe and illustrate
their dish....the recipes created at this center can be sent to the Banana Growers'
Association,...taste during the finale!
 
Center 3:A Banana a Day Keeps the Doctor Away
(The children) can use health books, medical journals,and other sources(as computers) to
discover the health benefits of bananas. They design pamphlets or posters about the
nutritional advantages of bananas. Display completed pamphlets and posters ... and
send them to the Banana Growers' Association.
 
Center 4: Banana Bulletin
(The children) use research materials at this center to locate banana trivia facts. When they
have collected at least ten each...create a game using these facts. Provide examples of paper
and pencil games, card games, and board games to give students ideams....Product
alternatives include: board games, paper and pencil games, riddle collections, card games,
word games such as Boggle™ or Scrabble™, charades, and combinations of other formats.
 
Center 5: Banana Cabana
Give (the children) examples of word games such as Boggle™ ,Hink Pink™ , Change a Word,
Transform a Word, and Rhyme Time™ . They can create their own word games using the
word banana. Completed copies of these games can be duplicated  for a newspaper r or
traded...(Children) have great fun solving these word puzzles.
 
Center 6: Famous Banana Gourmets
(The children) can investigate literature on Curious George, King Kong,Chita, and other banana
gourmands. They can work ...to create a banana-loving protagonist and write a story, picture
book, or comic about their banana fanatic.
 
Center 7: Where Do They Grow?
(The children can use atlases, films, and geographic materials to discover where bananas grow.
They can then create maps and charts to show the climate, soil, temperature, and growing
conditions necessary for bananas. At the conclusion of the unit, conduct a whole-group
discussion to explore these conditions. Follow-up questions can be directed to horticultural
specialists at a local university or extension service.
 
Center 8: Life on a Banana plantation
(The children) examine film, book, and pamphlet materials to discover the various jobs
on a plantation. Through diagrams and dramatic presentations they can share ...
 
Center 9:I'm Chiquita™ banana TV ad. They They can work ... to create a banana-selling
personality and advertisizing jingle. Completed versions can be videotaped ... . (The
children) can examine advertising techniques and discuss which ones have been used 
to make each ad. ...
Appendix B: Advertising Techniques
  1. Bandwagon Approach: Everybody else is doing it.
  2. Famous Name Sponsorship: Wayne Gretzky says bananas are good for you.
  3. Snob  Appeal: They're more expensive but you are worth it!
  4. Old Boy's Approach: The fruit Uncle Charlie was raised on!
  5. Logic: Bananas are so good for you. Why would you ever consider missing out on
      all this healthy food?
 6.   Bargain: Great Sale! Hurry before the sale ends.
 7.   Keeping up with the Jones': Be the first on your block to taste this new product!
 
Center 10: My appealing life as a Banana
(The children) can work ...to complete the following story. When their first drafts are written,
they can work ...to edit and complete published editions of their stories. Best efforts can be
published in the ...(family) newspaper.
Story Starter: "Hi, my name is _____Banana. You're probably thinking how boring my life as
a banana must be. Well, stop feeling sorry for me. I've had more adventures than you will ever
see in your lifetime. Let me tell you about one particularly exciting one..."
 
Center 11: Banana By-Products
What else are all those bananas used for? Are they all eaten raw? Students can use
newspaper clippings, other written accounts, and films to find out about banana by-products. 
(They) can create a chart or poster to show their information.
Finally, (they) can work ...to create a list of other possible future banana by-products.
Some ideas might include automobile fuel, cosmetics, and money substitutes.
 
The Finale: Banana Bonanza!
During the finale of this unit, (the children) can share the results of their work at the various
centers. This can take the form of displays, presentations, and rotating sharing discussions.
Have (the children) learn "The Banana Boat Song" and discuss the difficulties of bringing
bananas to our stores. Through discussion, (the children) will gain an appreciation for the
interdependence of our countries and our existence as part of a global village. As a final
shared activity, students can work ...to create poems based on the pattern of the color poem
"Red is..." but using the little "Yellow is a Ripe Banana."  
 
 
Going back to our Calendar History of June 5 as follows:
 
1910 The First Hot-Air Balloon Race was held in Indianapolis, Ind.
 
1917 More than 9 Million American Men began registering for the
draft during World War I.
 
1968 Moments after addressing supporters celebrating his victory
in the California Democratic presidential primary, Senator Robert F.
Kennedy was Shot in a Los Angeles hotel. He died the next day. 
 
1988 The Sixth Grade Center in University City, Mo., was
renamed the Ronald E. McNair School in honor of one of the
astronauts killed in the Challenger explosion.
 
Book (1) brings in "Honoring a hero-Students, staff, and parents in University City, Mo., decided to
rename their school after Dr. Ronald E. McNair because they though his adventuresome
spirit and diversified interests--including scuba diving, karate, gourmet cooking, and
jazz--would inspire students to take risks and explore untapped talents. What people
would your (children) consider honoring if their ( Church) needed a new name? What special
qualities would they look for in an honoree? Have (the children) work ...to discuss these
questions, then present their ideas to (you).
 
1989 In Poland's first free elections since World War II, the
Solidarity Party was a decisive majority.
 
June 5 is also World Environment Day 
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